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A story of the Shawanoes (Shawnee)

A story of the Shawanoes (Shawnee)
Creator: Rayner, John Allen
Date: 1886
This reminiscence by George Bluejacket, a Shawnee (Shawanoe) Indian originally from Ohio, tells the creation story of the Shawnee people as well as the history of his own tribe. Although his story ends before the Shawnee were relocated to Kansas (then called Indian Territory), it appears that he relocated with the rest of his tribe. The reminiscence was recorded by John Allen Rayner, and the first page of the document is an explanatory letter written by Rayner.


Cheyenne Indian drawing

Cheyenne Indian drawing
Creator: Northern Cheyenne
Date: Between 1870 and 1880
This is a colored pencil drawing created by a Cheyenne Indian, possibly Wild Hog. The item is a single sheet of paper with drawings on both sides. The tipi drawing appears on one side, the horse on the other. The drawings may be related to the 1878 escape of a band of Northern Cheyenne from Indian Territory and their attempt to return to their homeland north of Kansas. Six Cheyenne were confined to jail in Dodge City and charged with murder in 1879. The incident is commonly known as the Dull Knife raid and is regarded as the last major conflict between whites and Indians in Kansas.


Cheyenne Indian drawing

Cheyenne Indian drawing
Creator: Northern Cheyenne
Date: Between 1870 and 1880
This is a colored pencil drawing created by a Cheyenne Indian, possibly Wild Hog. The drawings may be related to the 1878 escape of a band of Northern Cheyenne from Indian Territory and their attempt to return to their homeland north of Kansas. The incident is commonly known as the Dull Knife raid and is regarded as the last major conflict between whites and Indians in Kansas.


Chronology of the Iowa and Sac and Fox Indians in Doniphan County, Kansas

Chronology of the Iowa and Sac and Fox Indians in Doniphan County, Kansas
Date: 1882
This chronology details major events occurring between 1837-1855 among the Iowa and Sac and Fox Indians who had been relocated to Kansas after the Indian Removal Act of 1830. Topics mentioned within the chronology include warfare among relocated tribes, the arrival of white emigrants, disease, mission buildings, and treaties ceding land to the United States government.


Council meeting at Kickapoo Agency

Council meeting at Kickapoo Agency
Creator: Baldwin, Royal
Date: 1857
This is a transcribed copy of a conversation between Keotuck and his fellow Potawatomi leaders and their Indian agent, Royal Baldwin. The Potawatomi and Kickapoo had been living on the same lands, and since they had just planted their crops, the Potawatomi were expressing their desire to remain settled on this land. Apparently the United States government had not given the Potawatomi their full annuity payment and had asked them to move, but Keotuck's band protested because they had paid 8,009 dollars to remain with the Kickapoo. The back of the document includes a transcription of the compact joining the Kickapoo and Potawatomi, written in 1851.


Drawings by Northern Cheyenne Indians

Drawings by Northern Cheyenne Indians
Creator: Northern Cheyenne
Date: About May 1879
This small notebook contains drawings by Northern Cheyenne Indians who were confined in jail in Dodge City, Kansas, in 1879. The State of Kansas was trying the six Indians (Wild Hog, Run Fast, Frizzly Head, Young Man, Old Man, and Crow) for a murder committed the previous year. In September 1878, chiefs Dull Knife and Little Wolf left Indian Territory with some 300 Cheyenne bound for their homeland north of Kansas. Atrocities committed during the band's trek through the state prompted a severe response from authorities, culminating in a standoff in Nebraska. The so-called "Dull Knife Raid" of 1878 proved the last major conflict between whites and Indians in Kansas. These drawings are often called ledger art. Sallie Straughn of Denver, Colorado, donated the notebook to the Kansas Historical Society in 1922. Mrs. Straughn was matron of the Dodge City jail in 1878 during the Cheyenne's incarceration when her husband, John W. Straughn, was the Dodge City jailer. Within the notebook, the images are arranged like a flip book. Left-facing images are right side up, while right-facing images are upside down. To preserve this original arrangement, we show all pages from cover to cover, then turn the book over and present all pages cover to cover again. This preserves the relationship between the images and allows all images to be viewed right side up.


George Martin correspondence on the 1878 route of the Cheyenne Indians through Kansas

George Martin correspondence on the 1878 route of the Cheyenne Indians through Kansas
Date: Bulk 1905-1906
These letters were written to George Martin, Secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society, documenting the 1878 route of the Cheyenne Indians through Kansas. Some of the letters include county maps where the writers marked the route. Letters were written by M. W. (Mike) Sutton from Dodge City; R. M. Wright, Dodge City; J. W. McNeal, Guthrie, Oklahoma; C. F. Colcord, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Geo. L. Kious,Selden, Kansas; J. D. Greason, Atwood, Kansas; C. P. Lynn, Ness City, Kansas; and Hill P. Wilson, Topeka, Kansas. Most of the letters pertain to the events and/or route through one or two counties known to the specific author. Counties mentioned include Barber, Buffalo (now part of Finney), Clark, Comanche, Decatur, Foote / Gray, Gove, Lane, Meade, Rawlins, and Sheridan. County maps exist for Clark, Comanche, Decatur, Gove, Meade, Rawlins, and Sheridan plus a state map. It is not clear who added the information to the maps. This collection of correspondence was digitized with funds donated by the Shears/Hubbard families in memory of William Chalfant.


Letters of Safeguard for To-sa-wi from the Confederate States of America

Letters of Safeguard for To-sa-wi from the Confederate States of America
Creator: Pike, Albert
Date: August 15, 1861
This letter of safeguard was presented to To-sa-wi, a chief of the Comanche Indians, by Albert Pike, Indian Commissioner of the Confederate States of America. The document ensures that To-sa-wi will have safe passage, without molestation, and that he is guaranteed the protection of the Confederate States.


Pictures drawn by Wild Hog and other Cheyenne Indians

Pictures drawn by Wild Hog and other Cheyenne Indians
Creator: Wild Hog, Cheyenne chief
Date: About May 1879
This small notebook contains drawings by Northern Cheyenne Indians who were confined in jail in Dodge City (Ford County) in 1879. The State of Kansas was trying the six Indians (Wild Hog, Run Fast, Frizzly Head, Young Man, Old Man, and Crow) for murders committed the previous year. In September 1878, chiefs Dull Knife and Little Wolf left Indian Territory with some 300 Cheyenne bound for their homeland north of Kansas. Atrocities committed during the band's trek through the state prompted a severe response from authorities, culminating in a standoff in Nebraska. The so-called "Dull Knife Raid" of 1878 proved the last major conflict between whites and Indians in Kansas. These drawings are often called ledger art. Dora A. Clayton of Denver, Colorado, donated this notebook to the Kansas Historical Society in 1939. Her husband, James Clayton, was clerk of the Indian Claims Commission created by the Kansas legislature in 1879 to investigate the losses resulting from the 1878 raid. The drawings appear upside down in the original beginning with pages 28-29 to the end. We rotated the images of these pages 180 degrees to make viewing easier.


Treaty between the U.S. government and Kansa tribe

Treaty between the U.S. government and Kansa tribe
Creator: United States. Bureau of Indian Affairs
Date: December 28, 1845
This treaty allowed the U. S. government to create a road connecting the western portion of Missouri to New Mexico (which was still in the hands of Mexico at this time). The treaty goes into some detail about the specifications for this road. It bears the signature of ten Kansa leaders and three Indian commissioners, included George Sibley. Attached to the back of the treaty is a travel pass for the "bearer of this, a Kansas Indian," allowing him undisturbed passage and requesting that he be provided with any necessary supplies. The document is dated August 16, 1825, but the note on the back is dated 1845.


Vocabulary of the Shawanoes (Shawnee)

Vocabulary of the Shawanoes (Shawnee)
Date: Between 1830 and 1855
This vocabulary of the Shawanoe (Shawnee) Indians includes the English word or numeral followed by a phonetic spelling of the Shawnee translation. The chart includes numbers, common nouns such as "man" and "deer," and simple phrases such as "I am very well." The origin of the vocabulary is unknown, but Jotham Meeker, a Baptist missionary in Indian Territory (present-day Kansas) did devise a written language for the Shawnee, which had previously been only a spoken language. The notation on the top of the manuscript reads "H. Howe 1875, p. 590."


William Brindle to Thomas Hendricks

William Brindle to Thomas Hendricks
Creator: Brindle, William
Date: February 13, 1857
In this letter William Brindle, receiver of the Lecompton Land Office, informed his associate Thomas Hendricks that the Delaware Indian lands that had been put up for public sale in 1856 had sold. The Delaware had owned some of the prime timber land in Kansas Territory, and as a result all sections of the Delaware lands were sold to white settlers.


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