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People - Notable People - Quantrill, William Clarke, 1837-1865

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Alex E. Case collection

Alex E. Case collection
Date: 1866 - 1917
In this small collection, Alex E. Case, a state representative from Marion, Kansas, describes his experiences in Kansas in the 1860s. He recounts a conversation with an Irish immigrant named Sallie Young, who told Case about her encounter with Quantrill's raiders as they rode towards Lawrence. Case also relates his memories of the Cheyenne Indian raids on Marion in 1868 and shares stories about his neighbors A. A. Moore and William Henry Roberts. A searchable transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below. Funds for digitization provided by Mr. Steve Peckel in memory of William Chalfant.


Andrew H. Reeder to John A. Haldeman

Andrew H. Reeder to John A. Haldeman
Creator: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: August 11, 1856
In this letter to John A. Haldeman, Andrew H. Reeder discusses the "sacking of Lawrence," the loss of papers related to the sale on lands that once belonged to Indians, and the use of Haldeman as his agent for his lots in Leavenworth, Kansas. As Reeder's letter indicates, the transition of Indian lands into the hands of white settlers was often quite difficult and added to tension levels in Kansas in the wake of the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854.


Charles Wolcott Smith

Charles Wolcott Smith
Date: Between 1880s and 1900s
This photograph shows a formal portrait of Charles Wolcott Smith, (1831-1907). Smith a native of Portage County, Ohio, migrated to Lawrence, Kansas in 1854 from Lowell, Massachusetts as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. A carpenter by trade, Smith was fortunate to escape from danger during Quantrill's Raid on August 21, 1863, as he was working on a building west of town. When he received word of the raid, Smith immediately came to the rescue to build wooden boxes for the deceased. On July 30, 1907, Smith died at the age of seventy-five at the home of his daughter Allie Omstead in Lawrence, Kansas.


Cyrus Leland letters

Cyrus Leland letters
Creator: Leland, Cyrus, 1841-1917
Date: 1862-1864
These letters were written by Cyrus Leland, primarily, during his time in the Civil War. Leland served in the 4th Kansas and later the10th Kansas Infantry, after the 3rd and 4th Kansas were consolidated to form the 10th. Many of the letters concern his efforts to be appointed as an aide-de-camp to General Thomas Ewing, Jr, and another mentions Preston Plumb and his actions during a charge by William Quantrill. Leland writes letters from Kansas City, Leavenworth, St. Louis, Rolla, and other places the regiment went. In a letter from Kansas City, MO, dated June 29, 1863, he asks his mother to send him $25 and to make him two white shirts. He also writes that he is staying at the Union House, along with some female prisoners. On stationery printed with "Headquarters District of the Border," he writes that General Schofield "has issued an order preventing the military of either Missouri or Kansas from crossing the state line without permission." A short letter written in pencil on October 12, 1863, about a military engagement near Booneville, Missouri, presents a contrast of letters written in the field to those written at Headquarters. Another letter written October 18, 1863, from "Camp near Carthage, MO, describes the capture of thirty Confederate troops. The letter written November 14th, 1863, describes an incident at a dance near Neosho, MO, that end with shooting. Leland ejected a soldier from "Blunts scouts" that was "a little more noisy than the rest" but when the soldier returned to Fort Scott, he told people he had been bushwhacked. Leland was from Troy, Doniphan County, KS. After the war, he served several terms in the Kansas House of Representatives.


Destruction of the city of Lawrence and massacre of its inhabitants by so-called rebel guerrillas

Destruction of the city of Lawrence and massacre of its inhabitants by so-called rebel guerrillas
Creator: Harpers Weekly
Date: September 5, 1863
This is an illustration of the August 21, 1863, raid led by William Clarke Quantrill, 1837-1865, on Lawrence, Kansas. Quantrill and a group of 300 Confederate guerrillas attacked Lawrence at dawn. They shot down every man they saw and fired into the windows as they rode by, killing nearly 200 people. Banks, stores, and saloons were all looted, along with dozens of houses. Much of what could not be carried off was burned and the town was covered with smoke. By nine o'clock in the morning, it was all over and Quantrill escaped into the Missouri hills. The illustration was copied from the September 5, 1863, issue of Harper's Weekly.


H.M. Simpson to Hiram Hill

H.M. Simpson to Hiram Hill
Creator: Simpson, H.M
Date: September 7, 1863
H.M. Simpson, of the Banking House of Simpsons Brothers in Lawrence, Kansas, wrote this letter to Hiram Hill of Massachusetts that provides many details concerning the number of dead and the extent of the destruction caused by Quantrill and his men during their August 21, 1863, raid on Lawrence. Chillingly, the letter vividly details how several of the victims of the attack met their end at the hands of Quantrill's raiders, including one man who paid the attackers $1,000 to spare his life, only to be shot and killed immediately after he turned the money over.


Hugh Fisher correspondence

Hugh Fisher correspondence
Date: 1861-1865
The collection consists of incoming and some outgoing correspondence and personal recollections of Hugh Fisher, involving the military, Fisher family members, and others; as well as recollections of Quantrill's 1863 raid against Lawrence from both Reverend Fisher and his son Charles. Fisher served as chaplain and was commissioned captain with the 5th Regiment Kansas Volunteers.


John Stillman Brown to John L. Rupur

John Stillman Brown to John L. Rupur
Creator: Brown, John Stillman, 1806-1902
Date: September 1, 1863
This letter was written by John Stillman Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to John L. Rupur. Brown gives a detailed and emotional account of William Quantrill's August 21, 1863, raid on Lawrence. Brown lists individual men and groups such as African Americans and Germans who were killed in the attack. He witnessed much of the violence from a hill above the city, and describes the destruction of life and property. Brown mentions that the town had no warning before the attack and that there was a second panic the following evening when townspeople feared another raid. He also describes how the community's churches came together for a memorial service. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Josephine Blakely Martin material

Josephine Blakely Martin material
Date: Between 1858 and 1881
Material relating to Josephine Blakely Martin and William S. Blakely. Included in this folder are journals, letters, appointments, and a diploma. Several pages of the journal have been skipped or cut out. Some of the letters discuss the Civil War, one noting a fight between troops of the Second Kansas Calvary and William Quantrill's men at David Tate's farm on March 22, 1862.


Josiah C. Trask

Josiah C. Trask
Creator: Connelley, William Elsey, 1855-1930
Date: 1910
This is an illustration of Josiah C. Trask, copied from Quantrill and the Border Wars by William Elsey Connelley. On August 21, 1863, the day Quantrill raided Lawrence, Kansas, Dr. J. F. Griswold, H. W. Baker, S. M. Thorpe, and Trask were at Griswold's home. When five guerrillas rode to the gate, the men surrendered. The guerrillas promised to protect the men, but as they were being marched to the Eldridge House, the men were shot. Only H. W. Baker survived.


Leigh R. Webber to Mrs. Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Mrs. Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: September 5, 1863
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Natchez, Mississippi, addressed to Mrs. Brown, wife of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber discusses reading accounts of the raid on Lawrence in the Cincinnati newspapers. He also describes camp life in Natchez, and shares a rumor that the troops may soon go to Kansas.


List of Quantrill's raid survivors, Lawrence, Kansas

List of Quantrill's raid survivors, Lawrence, Kansas
Date: 1891
This is a list of the people who survived Quantrill's Raid on Lawrence, Kansas. On August 21, 1863, William Quantrill and his followers attacked Lawrence, a free-state stronghold. After a four-hour siege, they had destroyed the town. Businesses and homes were looted and the town was burned. Quantrill and his men rounded up many men and boys into the middle of the town and as their wives and daughters watched, they were executed.


Mary Savage correspondence

Mary Savage correspondence
Creator: Savage, Mary
Date: October 1863-November 1863
These two letters from Mary Savage detail her experience with Quantrill's raid on Lawrence, Kansas. Mary describes seeing homes and businesses burning and women trying to put the fires out, hiding in nearby fields so not to be seen by Quantrill's men, to taking care of the wounded and dead after the raiders left.


Nellie J. Fargo to W.A.L. Thompson

Nellie J. Fargo to W.A.L. Thompson
Creator: Fargo, Nellie J.
Date: April 26, 1935
In this letter to Mrs. W.A.L. Thompson, Nellie J. Fargo relates information about her grandfather Thomas Johnson and the Shawnee Manual Labor School (Fairway, Kansas). Fargo also states that her grandfather was killed by some of William C. Quantrill's men in January 1865.


On to Lawrence, Kansas

On to Lawrence, Kansas
Creator: Donald, Jay
Date: Around 1883
An illustration titled "On to Lawrence" showing Confederate guerilla leader William Clarke Quantrill, 1837-1865, and his men moving toward Lawrence, Kansas. Early in the morning of August 21, 1863, guerilla forces led by Quantrill attacked Lawrence, killing nearly 200 people and burning most of the town. The illustration was created by L. Braunhold and copied from the book "Life and Adventures of the James Boys" written by Jay Donald.


Quantrell's Raiders comic book

Quantrell's Raiders comic book
Creator: Avon Periodicals, Inc.
Date: 1952
This comic book features "Quantrell's Raiders" from the movie "Red Mountain." It has a glossy yellow cover and twenty-five newsprint pages with color illustrations. The comic book is a fictional interpretation of the notorious Confederate guerrilla, William Clarke Quantrill and his men. Quantrill led over 300 men in a raid against the city of Lawrence, Kansas on August 21, 1863. Quantrill's Raiders killed over 150 men and destroyed some 200 homes and businesses. Only the cover has been scanned due to copyright restrictions.


Quantrill's Flag

Quantrill's Flag
Date: 1862
Small cotton and wool flag measuring 7 inches x 13 inches. The pattern is similar to the Confederate First National Flag, popularly known as the "Stars and Bars." Instead of stars, the canton has an image that has been described as either a fist or a crude representation of the South Carolina palmetto tree. The flag features the first five letters of the last name of notorious proslavery guerrilla William Clarke Quantrill. This flag was picked up in Olathe, Kansas by resident Jonathan Milliken after Quantrill's raid of that city on September 7, 1862. The flag probably was dropped by one of Quantrill's men.


Quantrill's Raid on Lawrence

Quantrill's Raid on Lawrence
Creator: Enderton, Sherman Bronson
Date: between 1868 and 1880
This pencil drawing on wood pulp paper shows Quantrill's raid on Lawrence, Kansas, drawn by Sherman Enderton. Early in the morning of August 21, 1863, Confederate guerilla forces led by William Clarke Quantrill, 1837-1865, attacked Lawrence, Kansas, killing nearly 200 people and burning most of the town. Enderton was a private in Co. E, 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry during the Civil War.


Quantrill's raid

Quantrill's raid
Creator: Fisk, Lauretta Louise Fox
Date: between 1866 and 1919
This black and white water color on paper was created by Lauretta Louise Fox Fisk, wife of Washburn College sociology professor Dr. D.M. Fisk, shows Quantrill's raid on Lawrence, Kansas, August 21, 1863. Confederate guerilla forces led by William Clarke Quantrill, 1837-1865, attacked Lawrence, Kansas, killing nearly 200 people and burning most of the town.


Survivors of the border ruffian attacks, Lawrence, Kansas

Survivors of the border ruffian attacks, Lawrence, Kansas
Date: Between 1890 and 1900
This is a black and white photograph of survivors from the border ruffian attacks on Lawrence, Kansas. The first attack took place on May 21, 1856, when approximately 800 pro-slavery advocates descended upon the Kansas town and proceeded to destroy anti-slavery forces. The second attack, led by William Clark Quantrill on August 21, 1863, resulted in the death of nearly 200 people and the burning of many business and homes within the community.


The state to be placed upon a war footing!

The state to be placed upon a war footing!
Creator: Kansas. Militia
Date: September 1863
This broadside appeared shortly after William Quantrill's raid on Lawrence, Kansas. It contains Kansas governor Thomas Carney's orders directing the Kansas State Militia to muster on September 12, 1863. The text includes details such as where and when militias will muster, how they will elect their officers and non-commissioned officers, the reason for the call-up, and the terms of service related to the call-up.


William Clarke Quantrill

William Clarke Quantrill
Date: Between 1861 and 1865
This is a formal portrait of William Clarke Quantrill, 1837-1865. Early in the morning of August 21, 1863, Confederate guerilla forces led by Quantrill attacked Lawrence, Kansas, killing nearly 200 people and burning most of the town.


William Clarke Quantrill

William Clarke Quantrill
Creator: Connelley, William Elsey, 1855-1930
Date: Possibly between 1850 and 1865
A portrait of "The Guerrilla Chief" William Clarke Quantrill, 1837-1865, as copied from the book "Quantrill and the Border Wars" by William Elsey Connelley (1st Ed., 1909). Early in the morning of August 21, 1863, Confederate guerilla forces led by Quantrill attacked Lawrence, Kansas, killing nearly 200 people and burning most of the town.


William Quantrill receipt

William Quantrill receipt
Creator: Quantrill, William Clarke, 1837-1865
Date: October 22, 1887
This receipt records a $30 payment to William Quantrill by Henry Torrey as the result of a business dispute over a land claim in Franklin County, Kansas. Harmon Beeson and Henry Torrey brought Quantrill with them to Kansas in 1857 from Ohio. A disagreement over a land claim led to a legal settlement between the three parties for which this receipt records the final payment. A Mrs. Wagstaff donated the receipt to the Historical Society through John Speer in September 1878. In a letter accompanying the donation, Speer notes that Torrey wrote the body of the receipt and that only the signature is in Quantrill's hand. See "Quantrill and the Border Wars" by William Elsey Connelley.


William Quantrill to [his brother] Franklin

William Quantrill to [his brother] Franklin
Creator: Quantrill, William Clarke, 1837-1865
Date: March 25, 1860
William Quantrill wrote this letter to his brother Franklin and a boy named Thomas. He inquires about their schooling and says he will have them try teaching school when he returns home. Quantrill's location is unknown but he indicates he has been "long amongst the Indians."


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