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Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill

Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill
Creator: Morton, Albert C.
Date: July 5, 1857
Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Morton discussed the allegations of fraudulent investment activities on the part of Samuel N. Simpson, and told Hill that Alfred Gray, an area attorney and future Secretary of the Wyandotte Board of Trade, had lost five acres of land due to Simpson's deceptive practices. Morton updated Hill on Quindaro's development, stating that the prospects were good due to the railroad's anticipated presence in town. He added that he still had not received that package containing $700 from Hill.


Alfred Gray

Alfred Gray
Creator: Leonard & Martin
Date: Between 1872 and 1880
A photograph of Alfred Gray, who was born in Evans, New York. In March 1857 Gray made the decision to immigrate to Kansas, where, at the age of 26, he settled in Quindaro, opening a law and real estate office. Soon, however, Gray chose to return to the occupation of his father, and he ultimately built one of the best farms in Wyandotte County. Gray was chief clerk of the territorial legislature and was elected to the first state legislature; in April 1862 he entered the army and served as a regimental quartermaster with the Fifth Kansas Cavalry and the 10th Kansas Infantry regiments. Gray is best known for his post-Civil War activities. He served as director of the State Agricultural Society from 1866 to 1870 and was elected secretary of the State Board of Agriculture in 1872, serving in this capacity until his death in 1880.


Alfred Gray correspondence

Alfred Gray correspondence
Creator: Gray, Alfred, 1830-1880
Date: 1855-1879
Correspondence from the Alfred Gray collection. Alfred was an early settler of Quindaro, in present-day Kansas City, Kansas. Quindaro was established by the New England Emigrant Aid Company in order to bring to Kansas abolitionists and others who wanted Kansas to become a free state. Gray remained in Kansas throughout his life. A resident of Wyandotte and Topeka, he served as the first Secretary to the Board of Agriculture. Gray County in southwest Kansas was named for him.


Alfred Gray miscellaneous writings and certificates

Alfred Gray miscellaneous writings and certificates
Creator: Gray, Alfred, 1830-1880
Date: Between 1870 and 1879
Miscellaneous writings and certificates from the Alfred Gray collection. Alfred was an early settler of Quindaro, in present-day Kansas City, Kansas. Quindaro was established by the New England Emigrant Aid Company in order to bring to Kansas abolitionists and others who wanted Kansas to become a free state. Gray remained in Kansas throughout his life. A resident of Wyandotte and Topeka, he served as the first Secretary to the Board of Agriculture. Gray County in southwest Kansas was named for him.


Alfred Gray to George W. Patterson

Alfred Gray to George W. Patterson
Creator: Gray, Alfred, 1830-1880
Date: June 18, 1860
Gray wrote this draft of a letter to George W. Patterson concerning a treaty between the U. S. government and the Delaware Indians at the request of Rev. Pratt, a missionary to the tribe. Gray was concerned that the treaty was unfair to many of the Delaware and that the U.S. government was negotiating with four older chiefs, not some of the younger members of the tribe. He wrote that many of the Delaware were too intimidated to complain.


Document by Jacob Hooper authorizing Alfred Gray as his true and lawful attornery

Document by Jacob Hooper authorizing Alfred Gray as his true and lawful attornery
Date: October 30, 1858
Hooper was a member of the Wyandot tribe and authorized Alfred Gray to accept his annuity money from the United States government. He also gave Gray authority to do whatever was needed on his behalf. Hooper made his signature with an X and the document was executed in the presence of Abelard Guthrie.


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