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Annual Report to the American Missionary Association

Annual Report to the American Missionary Association
Creator: Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898
Date: 1858
This draft report, written by Samuel L. Adair, covers the year 1857 and also describes the organization of the Congregational Church in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Samuel L. Adair was preaching at a number of rural churches in the area. It reports on membership, attendance, and other religious activities. He also mentions the activities of other denominations in the area.


Axe Head from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327

Axe Head from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327
Date: 1855-1912
This axe head was recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. The Western or Wisconsin style axe head has a faint manufacturer's mark. It is 22.5 cm long with one bit end measuring 11.9 cm and the other 11.1 cm.


Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair

Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Darrach, Barstow
Date: June 8, 1857
Dr. Barstow Darrach, writing from the New York Hospital, wrote Adair in great detail about his opinions of Kansas Territory's Governor Robert J. Walker and other political happenings in Kansas Territory.


Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair

Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Darrach, Barstow
Date: December 17, 1856
Dr. Barstow Darrach writes from the New York Hospital to comment on published reports that implied the prospects for Kansas Territory becoming a free state were improving. Darrach shares his thoughts on Republicans and Democrats at the national level and also on the possible reactions of southerners. Darrach asks for news of the petition to free Andrew Reeder and the recent Osawatomie arrests. He describes his personal plans that will prevent him from returning to Kansas Territory for at least two years.


Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair

Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Darrach, Barstow
Date: January 8, 1857
Dr. Barstow Darrach wrote to comment upon recent events at the national level and the prospect of little support for the free state cause from either Congress or President Buchanan. He reported that John Brown was in New York speaking about Kansas, and that Brown was trying to raise some funds and other support for the free state cause.


Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair

Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Darrach, Barstow
Date: November 27, 1856
Dr. Barstow Darrach had returned to New York Hospital after being in Kansas Territory. He wrote that he felt the prospects were not very favorable for Kansas Territory. He had found "some warm friends disposed to yield Kansas to the slave power rather than resort to a revolution," and he believed [President] Buchanan would only pretend to support freedom "until the south can make sure of their prize." Darrach felt it would take a large emigration of settlers to Kansas to make it a free state, and that free state settlers would be thwarted by the "bogus authority" and "another mob from Mo." should the Free State party appear at the polls. He stated that "the strongest argument [against success] that I see is that the people do not seem prepared." He wrote that he would ship clothing, flannel cloth, and blankets to Adair by way of W. F. M. Arny in Chicago.


Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair

Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Darrach, Barstow
Date: April 20, 1857
Barstow Darrach, a doctor at New York Hospital, wrote Adair that he was encouraged by the results of the recent Leavenworth election, and that he had authorized a Mr. Tator to settle his affairs in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Darrach also discussed the slave oligarchy and indications that St. Louis was opposed to slavery. He cited several events that he felt indicated the free state cause was progressing.


Biographical circulars

Biographical circulars
Date: 1890-1899
This collection consists of biographical forms sent by F. G. Adams, secretary of the Kansas Historical Society, to individuals whose names appeared in historically significant materials in the collections of the Kansas Historical Society. The responses are arranged alphabetically by last name. Biographical information may include full name, place and date of birth, place and date of settlement, present residence, place and date of death, official positions, and/or addresses of family members.


"Brother" Cup from the Adair Cabin Site

"Brother" Cup from the Adair Cabin Site
Date: 1858-1912
This porcelain tea cup, missing its handle, was recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. The base of the cup has the country of origin labeling indicating it was made in Germany. The Tariff Act of 1891 made mandatory country of origin labeling in the United States, though Europe had enacted such laws earlier.


Buttons from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327

Buttons from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327
Date: 1855-1912
These five buttons were just a few of those recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. The buttons include two bone 4-hole recessed buttons, half of a dark blue china 4-hole button, a metal loop or shank button that may have once had a pattern, and a small metal 2-hole button.


Canning Jar Liners from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327

Canning Jar Liners from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327
Date: 1855-1912
These three canning jar lid liners were just a few of those recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. All three liners are made of milk glass. One liner is labeled "WHITE CROWN CAP PAT - 11 - 22 10." Another liner, two fragments refitted, is decorated with concentric rings. The final example has the advertising "GENUINE BOYD'S CAP FOR MASON JARS."


Canning Jars from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327

Canning Jars from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327
Date: 1880-1912
These three different canning jars were recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. Shown is a Kerr "Economy" jar, a Mason jar with a patent date of November 30th, 1880, and an Atlas Glass Company jar.


Carter Ink Bottle from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327

Carter Ink Bottle from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327
Date: 1858-1912
This square machine-made clear glass bottle was recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. This small bottle advertises "CARTER'S" ink, which began operation in 1858 in Boston, Massachusetts.


Correspondence between Samuel Lyle Adair, Florella Brown Adair, and their children

Correspondence between Samuel Lyle Adair, Florella Brown Adair, and their children
Date: 1860-1862
Correspondence between Samuel Lyle Adair, his wife Florella Brown Adair, and their children, Charles, Emma, and Addie. Florella was the half- sister of abolitionist John Brown and Samuel was a minister and established the First Congregational Church of Osawatomie. Their cabin was a station on the Underground Railroad and John Brown's headquarters.


D. R. Barker to Samuel L. Adair

D. R. Barker to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Barker, D. R.
Date: February 16, 1857
Writing from Mercer, Pennsylvania, Barker, a former classmate of Adair's at Oberlin College, commented on the political situation in regard to Kansas Territory and pro-slavery forces, including pro-slavery churches.


Dishes from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327

Dishes from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327
Date: 1855-1912
These dish fragments were just a few of those that were recovered during excavations at the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. A wide variety of patterns were recovered from the site during excavation including these floral transferware sherds, decorated by transfer printing. The site was excavated in 2014 during the Kansas Archeological Training Program field school. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years.


E. L. Partridge to Samuel L. Adair

E. L. Partridge to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Partridge, E. L. (Mrs. William)
Date: December 28, 1856
Mrs. E. L. Partridge writes Samuel L. Adair to report upon the condition of her husband, William, who is a prisoner in Tecumseh, Kansas Territory. Mr. Partridge was one of the free state men arrested after the May 1856 Pottawatomie Massacre of five pro-slavery settlers. Mrs. Partridge describes her husband's health and his prospects for being released.


Edmund Burke Whitman to Samuel L. Adair

Edmund Burke Whitman to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883
Date: October 5, 1857
Whitman writes from (presumably) Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to ask Samuel Adair for his assistance in distributing remaining relief clothing before winter. He includes instructions for notifying the public of the availability of relief goods and indicates that whomever Adair "knows to be in absolute want" should have first priority. Whitman feels the task of distribution would not take longer than one week. He also wants Adair to estimate the number of poor families in his [Adair's] community.


Franco American Hygienic Company Jar from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327

Franco American Hygienic Company Jar from the Adair Cabin, 14MM327
Date: 1889-1912
This jar was recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. One side of the jar has the advertising: "FRANCO AMERICAN HYGIENIC CO. CHICAGO." The jar likely held face cream or some other toiletry product.


G. S. Lewis to Samuel L. Adair

G. S. Lewis to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Lewis, G. S.
Date: December 12, 1856
G. S. Lewis,a friend of Samuel Adair, writes from Albany in Athens County, Ohio. Lewis was concerned about the safety of the Adair family, and commented on the trials they must be suffering. He comments on the bravery of Charley, the Adair's son who helped warn Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, of the coming of proslavery forces prior to the Battle of Osawatomie. Lewis also comments on John Brown, Gov. Geary, John Freemont, and the political situation in Kansas Territory and nationally. He shares rumors of slave insurrections in Kentucky and Tennessee.


Glass Bottle Stopper from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327

Glass Bottle Stopper from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327
Date: 1855-1912
This octagonal lavender glass bottle stopper has a molded floral design on the top. Bottle stoppers were essential to close sealed bottles to the air once they had been opened. This stopper was recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years.


Graduated Medicine Bottles from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327

Graduated Medicine Bottles from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327
Date: 1906-1929
These two medicine bottles were recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Both bottles were closed with a cork and have graduated metric and American dosage scales. The larger bottle has bottle maker's marks ("LYRIC" and the Illinois Glass Company mark) that indicate it may post date the Adair's occupation and the removal of the cabin to the city park. The small bottle advertises the Marion Bottle Company of Marion, Indiana. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years.


Graniteware Pan from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327

Graniteware Pan from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327
Date: 1855-1912
This straight sided pan was recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Graniteware is a type of enamelware, coated with enamel, which when fired created a non-porous glaze on the surface, enabling easier clean up. Enamelware cookware was popular in the 19th century. If the pan had a handle that attachment has rusted away. Osawatomie and the Adairs was much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years.


H. H. Williams, and others, to Samuel L. Adair

H. H. Williams, and others, to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Williams, Henry H.
Date: June 14, 1856
H. H. Williams writes from Tecumseh, Kansas Territory, where he was imprisoned along with seven other suspects in the Pottawatomie massacre, to inform Rev. Samuel Adair of their situation. The letter is also signed by the seven other prisoners--William Partridge, Jason Brown, S. W. Kilbourne, John Brown Jr., S. B. Morse, Jacob Benjamin, and P. D. Maness. He indicates that they were charged with high treason. He also reported on John Brown, Jr.'s health. Williams asked Adair to try to raise some funds for their legal defense as they had hired a lawyer.


Harvey Jones to Samuel L. Adair

Harvey Jones to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Jones, Harvey
Date: December 14, 1859
Jones, a Congregational minister who lived in Wabaunsee, Kansas Territory, wrote to Samuel L. Adair after John Brown's attack at Harpers Ferry, Virginia. Jones asked Adair to write to him about John Brown's character, and to indicate whether Brown was associated with a church.


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