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Ada L. James to Lucy B. Johnston

Ada L. James to Lucy B. Johnston
Creator: James, Ada L.
Date: November 6, 1912
Ada James, President of the Political Equality League of Wisconsin, sent this telegram to Lucy Johnston, President of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association in Topeka, Shawnee County. James congratulated Johnston on the successful passage of a universal suffrage amendment to the state constitution.


Anna Howard Shaw to Lucy B. Johnston

Anna Howard Shaw to Lucy B. Johnston
Creator: Shaw, Anna Howard, 1847-1919
Date: November 6, 1912
Anna Shaw, president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, sent this telegram to Lucy Johnston, president of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, announcing that women in Kansas had gained the vote.


Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Annie (Le Porte) Diggs
Creator: Snyder
Date: Between 1890 and 1899
A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women's suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer's Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women's voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.


Crazy quilt

Crazy quilt
Date: between 1880 and 1935
Crazy Quilt made up of irregularly shaped multi-colored silks, satins and many printed silk ribbons from meetings of the Kansas Federation of Women's Clubs, the Kansas Council of Women, State Bar Association, and other organizations. Dates on ribbons range from 1882 to 1930. One includes a 1928 Republican National Convention button depicting Kansan Charles Curtis. Most fabrics are outlined in featherstitch embroidery, with scattered embroidered stars and scissors. Hand-stitched. Bound in black velvet and backed in pale green silk. This quilt belonged to William Agnew Johnston and Mrs. Lucy Browne Johnston of Topeka. The Johnstons were active in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association (K.E.S.A.) and the Men's Equal Suffrage League (M.E.S.L.) of Kansas, two organizations that were critical allies in the 1912 ratification of the Woman's Suffrage Amendment to the Kansas constitution. This amendment made Kansas the seventh state to enfranchise women. Lucy Johnston was president and campaign manager of K.E.S.A. in 1911-1912 during the final push for ratification. She also was active in other women's clubs and lobbied for better libraries around the state. Her husband, William Agnew Johnston, was Chief Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court and an active member of the M.E.S.L. of Kansas, an organization that canvassed the state for woman's suffrage.


Delegates to the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, Topeka, Kansas

Delegates to the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, Topeka, Kansas
Date: 1916
A photograph showing a group of delegates to the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association in Topeka, Shawnee County. This group voted to affiliate with the national association as support for a women's suffrage amendment to the U. S. Constitution. Kansas women had already won the right to vote in 1912.


Kansas Equal Suffrage Association thirtieth annual convention

Kansas Equal Suffrage Association thirtieth annual convention
Creator: Kansas Equal Suffrage Association (1884-1913)
Date: Bulk May 19, 1913-May 20, 1913
This program is for the thirtieth annual convention of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. The program includes the events of the convention and a listing of the committees. Lucy B. Johnston was the president and Stella Stubbs, the wife of Governor W. R. Stubbs, was the first vice president. The convention was held in Lawrence, Kansas, May 19-20, 1913.


Kansas Suffrage Reveille: organ of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association

Kansas Suffrage Reveille: organ of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association
Creator: Kansas Equal Suffrage Association (1884-1913)
Date: March 1896-November 1900
This monthly paper served as the official organ of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association (KESA). The paper began publication in March 1896 and was apparently discontinued in November 1900. This collection includes fifty-three of the fifty-five issues published. Two issues [Vol. 2 No. 9 (December) 1897 and Vol. 3 No. 1 (January) 1898] are missing. The executive committee of the KESA subsidized the publication. The paper was intended to improve communication on suffrage issues between the state organization and various local organizations. It contains information about the activities of local equal suffrage associations all over Kanas, news of elections of women to local offices, and stories about the activities of national leaders such as Susan B. Anthony (Aunt Susan) and Carrie Chapman Catt. Publication began in Eureka, Kansas, with Katie R. Addison as editor and publisher. Production of the paper moved to Leroy, Kansas, by February 1898 with Alice M. David as editor and publisher. The paper includes writings by Charlotte Perkins Stetson Gilman and reports on her activities. A complete text version of this title is being prepared but is not yet available.


Lilla Day Monroe and Lillian Mitchner

Lilla Day Monroe and Lillian Mitchner
Date: Between 1890 and 1910
Lilla Day Monroe (left) was one of Topeka's leading citizens during the early part of the twentieth century. Over the course of her life, she served as president of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, editor of "The Club Member" and "The Kansas Woman's Journal," and as a founding member of the Good Government Club. Lillian Mitchner (right) was state president of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU).


Lucy B. Johnston to County Presidents of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association

Lucy B. Johnston to County Presidents of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association
Creator: Johnston, Lucy Browne, 1846-1937
Date: 1911
Lucy Johnston, President of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, wrote this letter to all the county presidents of this organization, explaining the three elements of their campaign for women's suffrage: membership extension, education, and press releases. The letter describes each of these actions and provides the names of the women in charge of each action. Johnston particularly emphasizes the importance of membership, stating that in California, house-to-house canvassing with membership cards played a major role in that state's acceptance of women's suffrage.


Lucy Browne Johnston

Lucy Browne Johnston
Creator: Leonard, J. H.
Date: Between 1911 and 1915
Lucy Browne Johnston, 1846-1937, was an active participant in several Kansas reform movements and organizations. She served as president of the Kansas Federation of Women's Clubs, and was involved in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, helping to gain the vote for Kansas women in 1912. She was married to William Agnew Johnson, Chief Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court.


Luther M. Nellis to Lucy Johnston

Luther M. Nellis to Lucy Johnston
Creator: Nellis, Luther M.
Date: November 7, 1912
This colorful postcard, sent by Luther M. Nellis of Los Angeles, California, congratulates Lucy Johnston on the successful passage of an amendment granting full suffrage to Kansas women. Nellis firmly believes that the female vote will have a positive impact on Kansans and applauds Johnston's work as president of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association.


Mass meeting! In the interest of the pending woman suffrage amendment

Mass meeting! In the interest of the pending woman suffrage amendment
Creator: Kansas Equal Suffrage Association (1884-1913)
Date: 1894
This poster advertises a woman suffrage meeting in Wakeeney, Trego County, to be held on June 19th and 20th, 1894. The speakers were Carrie Chapman-Catt, Annie Diggs (a well-known Populist), and Theresa Jenkins. Women in Kansas did not gain full suffrage until 1912.


Minutes of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association at the fifth annual meeting

Minutes of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association at the fifth annual meeting
Creator: Kansas Equal Suffrage Association (1884-1913)
Date: Bulk November 13, 1888-November 15, 1888
The Kansas Equal Suffrage Association held its fifth annual meeting in Emporia Kansas from November 13-15, 1888. The pamphlet includes the minutes of the convention, an address by the president Laura Johns, listings of officers of the state and local organizations. It contains information about the activities of district, county, and local branches of the organization. Susan B. Anthony attended the meeting. With the support of both the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association and the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, a Council of Women was formed during this meeting. The constitution of this organization is included in the pamphlet. Mrs. C. H. Cushing of Leavenworth was elected president.


Minutes of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association at the sixth annual meeting in 1889

Minutes of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association at the sixth annual meeting in 1889
Creator: Kansas Equal Suffrage Association (1884-1913)
Date: Bulk October 1, 1889-October 3, 1889
The Kansas Equal Suffrage Association held its sixth annual meeting in Wichita, Kansas, from October 1-3, 1889. The pamphlet includes the minutes of the convention, an address by the president Laura Johns, listings of officers of the state and local organizations. It contains information about the activities of district, county, and local branches of the organization. Susan B. Anthony attended the meeting.


Minutes of the first, second, third and fourth annual meetings of the Kansas Equal Rights Suffrage Association

Minutes of the first, second, third and fourth annual meetings of the Kansas Equal Rights Suffrage Association
Creator: Kansas Equal Suffrage Association (1884-1913)
Date: January 6, 1887
This pamphlet contains the minutes of the first four annual meetings of the Kansas Equal Rights Suffrage Association. The meetings were held in 1884 in Topeka, in 1885 in Salina, in 1886 in Topeka, and in 1887 in Newton. The minutes for the 4th annual meeting contain a paper presented to the convention by F. G. Adams titled "The Women's Vote in Kansas." Adams, who was secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society at the time, compiled information about Kansas women voting the elections of April 1887. The minutes for each annual meeting include details of the meeting, the speakers, and who attended. The publication includes information on suffrage activities in all parts of the state and on women working suffrage. This was an important period for women's suffrage in Kansas because the voters in Kansas amended the constitution to permit women to vote in municipal elections in 1886.


Minutes of the seventh annual meeting of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association in 1890

Minutes of the seventh annual meeting of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association in 1890
Creator: Kansas Equal Suffrage Association (1884-1913)
Date: Bulk November 18, 1890-November 20, 1890
The seventh annual meeting of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association was held in Atchison, Kansas, November 18-20, 1890. The booklet includes minutes, lists of officers of district auxiliaries, and details of each session. Laura Johns was president and her annual address is included in the pamphlet.


Mrs. L. W. Therkelsen to Lucy B. Johnston

Mrs. L. W. Therkelsen to Lucy B. Johnston
Creator: Therkelsen, Mrs. L. W.
Date: November 6, 1912
In this short letter, Mrs. L. W. Therkelsen, publicity chairman of the Oregon State Equal Suffrage Association, sends her congratulations to Lucy Johnston, President of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, after the successful passage of a universal women's suffrage amendment to the Kansas state constitution. Therkelsen hoped that the amendment to the Oregon constitution, which was currently under consideration, would be equally successful. Oregon did eventually pass an equal suffrage amendment in 1912, becoming the third state that year to do so.


Secretary's Report, 8th annual meeting of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association

Secretary's Report, 8th annual meeting of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association
Creator: Kansas Equal Suffrage Association (1884-1913)
Date: 1891
The 8th annual meeting of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association was held in Topeka, Kansas, November 18-20,1891. The minutes of the various sessions are quite detailed and include excepts from several speeches. Several men addressed the convention and there was some discontent from the women about comments by politicians. Mrs. Laura Johns continued to serve as president.


Suffragettes, Topeka, Kansas

Suffragettes, Topeka, Kansas
Date: 1912
These suffragettes are in Governor Walter Roscoe Stubb's automobile, going after the vote in Topeka, Kansas. The women are identified as: (l to r) Laura Clay, President of Kentucky Equal Rights Association; Lucy B. Johnston; Sarah A. Thurston; Helen Eacker; and Stella H. Stubbs. They were all members of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association.


Susan B. Anthony to Governor John P. St. John

Susan B. Anthony to Governor John P. St. John
Date: April 21, 1879
Susan B. Anthony has enclosed a $10.00 subscription for the Kansas Freedman's Relief Association in this letter to Governor John P. St. John. She also wrote that she wanted to meet with St. John to discuss the "speediest method" to bring about United States citizenship and equal rights for women.


Twenty-fifth annual convention of the K.E.S.A.

Twenty-fifth annual convention of the K.E.S.A.
Creator: Monroe, Lilla Day, 1858-1929
Date: December 1908
This article outlines the resolutions made at the annual convention of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association meeting on October 30, 1908. These resolutions explain the reasons why these women supported female suffrage, including their belief that "we deem it more direct, more womanly, more dignified to cast our own ballot than to ask some man for his vote on a matter that concerns us vitally." As stated near the beginning of the article, the members of this group took their cue from the declaration of women's rights from the first suffrage convention in the United States, held at Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848.


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