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Damage to the Pike Pawnee monument in Republic County, Kansas

Damage to the Pike Pawnee monument in Republic County, Kansas
Date: 1946
Several views of damage to the Pike Pawnee monument in Republic County, Kansas. This monument is part of the Pawnee Indian Museum, the oldest historic site owned by the state of Kansas. In 1899 George and Elizabeth Johnson deeded to the state of Kansas most of the site upon which a large Kitkehahki (Republican) band Pawnee earth lodge village had stood in the late 1700's. The state accepted the site in 1901, put up an iron fence and erected a granite obelisk to mark the site where in 1806, United States explorer Zebulon Pike convinced the Pawnees to lower the Spanish flag, recently left there by a large Spanish force and raise the United States flag. Supposedly this was the first time the U.S. flag was raised west of the Missouri River. This flag raising episode was true except it happened about 40 miles up the Republican River at a village the Pawnees moved to after deserting this one. The portion of this site that was saved included 22 earth lodge depressions, numerous storage pit depressions, and remains of the fortification wall. Two house depressions were excavated in 1949 but intensive investigation of the site did not occur until 1965 under the direction of Kansas State Archeologist Tom Witty. In 1967 the museum was constructed around one of the largest of the lodge depressions before it was excavated. What the residents of the lodge left behind was uncovered by the archeologists and left in the exact same spots. Only eight of the 22 lodge depressions have been excavated. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Today the site is operated by the Kansas Historical Society as Pawnee Indian Museum State Historic Site.


Indian dance and celebration at Pawnee Village, Republic County

Indian dance and celebration at Pawnee Village, Republic County
Date: 1901
This photograph shows an Indian dance and celebration at Pawnee Village in Republic County, Kansas.


Open house at the Pawnee Indian Village Museum, Republic County

Open house at the Pawnee Indian Village Museum, Republic County
Date: August 22, 1965
Three views of the open house at Pawnee Indian Village Museum in Republic County, Kansas. The Pawnee Indian Museum is the oldest historic site owned by the state of Kansas. In 1899 George and Elizabeth Johnson deeded to the state of Kansas most of the site upon which a large Kitkehahki (Republican) band Pawnee earth lodge village had stood in the late 1700's. The state accepted the site in 1901, put up an iron fence and erected a granite obelisk to mark the site where in 1806, United States explorer Zebulon Pike convinced the Pawnees to lower the Spanish flag, recently left there by a large Spanish force and raise the United States flag. Supposedly this was the first time the U.S. flag was raised west of the Missouri River. This flag raising episode was true except it happened about 40 miles up the Republican River at a village the Pawnees moved to after deserting this one. The portion of this site that was saved included 22 earth lodge depressions, numerous storage pit depressions, and remains of the fortification wall. Two house depressions were excavated in 1949 but intensive investigation of the site did not occur until 1965 under the direction of Kansas State Archeologist Tom Witty. In 1967 the museum was constructed around one of the largest of the lodge depressions before it was excavated. What the residents of the lodge left behind was uncovered by the archeologists and left in the exact same spots. Only eight of the 22 lodge depressions have been excavated. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Today the site is operated by the Kansas Historical Society as Pawnee Indian Museum State Historic Site.


Pawnee Indian Village celebration

Pawnee Indian Village celebration
Date: 1935
This photograph represents a group of men, women and children celebrating at the Pawnee Indian Village in Republic County, Kansas. Children identified from left to right is: Alex Young Eagle, Sarah Young Eagle, and John Knife Chief. Adults identified from left to right is: Frank Young Eagle, Pearl Young Eagle, Charlie Knife Chief, Annie Knife Chief, Guide None Indian, Paul Little Eagle, Julia Little Eagle, Nellie Peters, and Jessie Peters. The museum was constructed in 1967 and has been operating under the control of the Kansas Historical Society. The site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


Pawnee Indian Village Museum diorama

Pawnee Indian Village Museum diorama
Date: between 1967 and 1971
This photograph portrays a diorama at the Pawnee Indian Village Museum in Republic County, Kansas representing Indian culture. The museum was constructed in 1967 and has been operating under the control of the Kansas Historical Society. The site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


Pawnee Indian Village Museum diorama and display

Pawnee Indian Village Museum diorama and display
Date: between 1967 and 1971
These photographs represent the interior displays and a diorama of Pawnee's killing a herd of buffalo at the Pawnee Indian Museum in Republic County, Kansas. The museum was constructed in 1967 and has been operating under the control of the Kansas Historical Society. The site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


Pawnee Indian Village Museum earthlodge floor with artifacts

Pawnee Indian Village Museum earthlodge floor with artifacts
Date: Unknown
Drafted map of the excavated floor of House 5 at 14RP1, now exposed beneath the museum at Pawnee Indian Museum State Historic Site. House 5 was excavated in 1967 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists.


Placing marker on the hill, Pawnee Village site, Republic County

Placing marker on the hill, Pawnee Village site, Republic County
Date: July 04, 1901
A photograph showing the placing of a marker on a hill at the Pawnee Village site in Republic County, Kansas. This area would become the Pawnee Indian Museum, the oldest historic site owned by the state of Kansas. In 1899 George and Elizabeth Johnson deeded to the state of Kansas most of the site upon which a large Kitkehahki (Republican) band Pawnee earth lodge village had stood in the late 1700's. The state accepted the site in 1901, put up an iron fence and erected a granite obelisk to mark the site where in 1806, United States explorer Zebulon Pike convinced the Pawnees to lower the Spanish flag, recently left there by a large Spanish force and raise the United States flag. Supposedly this was the first time the U.S. flag was raised west of the Missouri River. This flag raising episode was true except it happened about 40 miles up the Republican River at a village the Pawnees moved to after deserting this one. The portion of this site that was saved included 22 earth lodge depressions, numerous storage pit depressions, and remains of the fortification wall. Two house depressions were excavated in 1949 but intensive investigation of the site did not occur until 1965 under the direction of Kansas State Archeologist Tom Witty. In 1967 the museum was constructed around one of the largest of the lodge depressions before it was excavated. What the residents of the lodge left behind was uncovered by the archeologists and left in the exact same spots. Only eight of the 22 lodge depressions have been excavated. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Today the site is operated by the Kansas Historical Society as Pawnee Indian Museum State Historic Site.


Unveiling the Pike monument at Pawnee Village, Republic County, Kansas

Unveiling the Pike monument at Pawnee Village, Republic County, Kansas
Date: September 30, 1901
Three photographs showing the unveiling of the Pike monument at Pawnee Village in Republic County, Kansas. This monument commemorates the site where in 1806, United States explorer Zebulon Pike convinced the Pawnees to lower the Spanish flag recently left there by a large Spanish force and raise the United States flag. This flag raising episode was true except it happened about forty miles up the Republican River at a village the Pawnees moved to after deserting this one. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971 and today is operated by the Kansas Historical Society as Pawnee Indian Museum State Historic Site.


View of a celebration at Pawnee Village in Republic County, Kansas

View of a celebration at Pawnee Village in Republic County, Kansas
Creator: Cundiff, George H.
Date: September 30, 1901
This photograph shows people gathering for the dedication of the Pike monument at the Pawnee Village site in Republic County, Kansas. This site, which is now part of the Pawnee Indian Museum, is the oldest historic site owned by the state of Kansas. In 1899 George and Elizabeth Johnson deeded to the state of Kansas most of the site upon which a large Kitkehahki (Republican) band Pawnee earth lodge village had stood in the late 1700's. The state accepted the site in 1901, put up an iron fence and erected a granite obelisk to mark the site where in 1806, United States explorer Zebulon Pike convinced the Pawnees to lower the Spanish flag, recently left there by a large Spanish force and raise the United States flag. Supposedly this was the first time the U.S. flag was raised west of the Missouri River. This flag raising episode was true except it happened about forty miles up the Republican River at a village the Pawnees moved to after deserting this one. The portion of this site that was saved included twenty-two earth lodge depressions, numerous storage pit depressions, and remains of the fortification wall. Two house depressions were excavated in 1949 but intensive investigation of the site did not occur until 1965 under the direction of Kansas State Archeologist Tom Witty. In 1967 the museum was constructed around one of the largest of the lodge depressions before it was excavated. What the residents of the lodge left behind was uncovered by the archeologists and left in the exact same spots. Only eight of the twenty-two lodge depressions have been excavated. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Today the site is operated by the Kansas Historical Society as Pawnee Indian Museum State Historic Site.


Views of contruction and excavation for the Pawnee Indian Village Museum

Views of contruction and excavation for the Pawnee Indian Village Museum
Date: 1967
These photographs show the construction and excavation for the Pawnee Indian Village Museum in Republic County, Kansas. The Pawnee Indian Museum is the oldest historic site owned by the state of Kansas. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Today the site is operated by the Kansas Historical Society as Pawnee Indian Museum State Historic Site.


Views of the celebration at Pawnee Village, Republic County

Views of the celebration at Pawnee Village, Republic County
Date: 1906
Two views of a celebration at Pawnee Village in Republic County, Kansas. This site is now part of the Pawnee Indian Museum, the oldest historic site owned by the state of Kansas. In 1899 George and Elizabeth Johnson deeded to the state of Kansas most of the site upon which a large Kitkehahki (Republican) band Pawnee earth lodge village had stood in the late 1700's. The state accepted the site in 1901, put up an iron fence and erected a granite obelisk to mark the site where in 1806, United States explorer Zebulon Pike convinced the Pawnees to lower the Spanish flag, recently left there by a large Spanish force and raise the United States flag. Supposedly this was the first time the U.S. flag was raised west of the Missouri River. This flag raising episode was true except it happened about 40 miles up the Republican River at a village the Pawnees moved to after deserting this one.


Views of the Pawnee Village monument, Republic County, Kansas

Views of the Pawnee Village monument, Republic County, Kansas
Date: Between 1906 and 1960
Views of the Pawnee Village monument in Republic County, Kansas, located near the Pawnee Indian Museum. This museum is the oldest historic site owned by the state of Kansas. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971. Today the site is operated by the Kansas Historical Society as Pawnee Indian Museum State Historic Site.


Views of the Pawnee Village site, Republic County, Kansas

Views of the Pawnee Village site, Republic County, Kansas
Date: Between 1920 and 1940
Three views of the Pawnee Village site in Republic County, Kansas. This site is part of the Pawnee Indian Museum, the oldest historic site owned by the state of Kansas. In 1899 George and Elizabeth Johnson deeded to the state of Kansas most of the site upon which a large Kitkehahki (Republican) band Pawnee earth lodge village had stood in the late 1700's. The state accepted the site in 1901, put up an iron fence and erected a granite obelisk to mark the site where in 1806, United States explorer Zebulon Pike convinced the Pawnees to lower the Spanish flag, recently left there by a large Spanish force and raise the United States flag. Supposedly this was the first time the U.S. flag was raised west of the Missouri River. This flag raising episode was true except it happened about 40 miles up the Republican River at a village the Pawnees moved to after deserting this one.


Showing 1 - 14

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