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Address of C.E. Adams before the second flag raising of the Pawnee Republic Historical Society

Address of C.E. Adams before the second flag raising of the Pawnee Republic Historical Society
Creator: Adams, C.E.
Date: September 29, 1897
This item is a draft of C.E. Adams's speech to mark the occasion of the second flag raising of the Pawnee Republic Historical Society in September 1897.


Address of the Constitutional Convention to American Public

Address of the Constitutional Convention to American Public
Date: April 3, 1858
A committee made up of John M. Walden, James Fletcher, Thomas Ewing, Jr., Isaac T. Goodnow, Henry J. Adams, T. Dwight Thacher, and Addison Danford prepared this eleven-page manuscript "address to accompany the instrument" adopted at the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention. The statement essentially laid out the philosophical foundations and rationale for the new document. It argued that the facts showed the overwhelming majority of Kansans desired admission as a free state.


Altgeld's great speech

Altgeld's great speech
Creator: Altgeld, John P.
Date: 1898
A speech delivered by John P. Altgeld to the working men of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on Labor Day, 1897. Altgeld's idea was that government ownership is the remedy for the nation's existing troubles.


Basic campaign speech

Basic campaign speech
Creator: Carlin, John, 1940-
Date: 1982
This is Governor John Carlin's basic campaign speech for his 1982 gubernatorial reelection campaign. He outlines his accomplishments during his first term as governor: a balanced budget, no growth in the number of state employees, and limited increases in state spending. He also identified several goals for a second administration including property tax relief, enactment of a severance tax on gas and oil producers, improvements in education, and transportation enhancements. Governor Carlin defeated Sam Hardage in the 1982 election and served a second term as governor.


Charles Robinson's speech welcoming William Seward

Charles Robinson's speech welcoming William Seward
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 26, 1860
This is a handwritten copy of Charles Robinson's September 26, 1860, speech welcoming William H. Seward to Lawrence, Kansas Territory. It contains some additional comments by Robinson to the friends to whom he is sending this copy.


Copy of David R. Atchison speech to proslavery forces

Copy of David R. Atchison speech to proslavery forces
Creator: Atchison, David Rice, 1807-1886
Date: May 21, 1856
This hand written copy of a speech by David Atchison, according to a note on the top of page one, made by R. J. Hinton, "was made for me [Hinton] by or under the direction of Lt. Gov. (Dr.) Root. Joseph Pomeroy Root, who was subsequently elected the state's first lieutenant governor under the Wyandotte Constitution, was a prisoner, heard & reported the speech" made by David Atchison to the assembled proslave "Soldiers" camped two miles west of Lawrence, Kansas Territory, before they marched on and sacked Lawrence on May 21, 1856. The transcript is labeled "Hon. David R. Atchison's speech . . ." and begins, "This is the most glorious day of my life! This day I am a border-ruffian!"


Discourse of Mr. Benton, of Missouri: before the Maryland Institute

Discourse of Mr. Benton, of Missouri: before the Maryland Institute
Creator: Benton, Thomas Hart, 1782-1858
Date: 1854
The discourse of Mr. Benton of Missouri, before the Maryland Institute, on the physical geography of the country between Missouri and California, with viewpoints on its adoption to settlement and the construction of a railroad. This lecture was delivered at Baltimore, Maryland, on December, 1854.


Dividends of safety

Dividends of safety
Creator: Union Pacific Railway Company
Date: September 30, 1925
This pamphlet contains the text of the address made by Carl R. Gray, president of the Union Pacific System, before an annual banquet of the National Safety Council in Cleveland, Ohio, on September 30, 1925. The address begins with a brief history of railroads excerpted from "First Spikes in Railway History in England and America" by A. Saintsby (1925). Gray then describes the history of the Safety Movement on Railroad, and the safety measures employed by the Union Pacific Railway Company to guarantee safe rail travel on their system ("Lives saved, limbs saved, homes saved -- 'these are the Dividends of Safety'").


Draft of Senator Arthur Capper's New Deal speech

Draft of Senator Arthur Capper's New Deal speech
Creator: Capper, Arthur, 1865-1951
Date: 1934
This draft of a speech by Senator Arthur Capper contains his views on President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. In the draft, Capper insists that the Republican Party must serve as a check and a balance against the Democratic Party. However, he clearly states that "the Republicans cannot afford to block the President's program merely for partisan advantage." In Capper's view, the Republican Party must carefully observe what is going on with the various New Deal agencies, and actively work to ensure that the good of the American people is at the heart of everything that is done by the U.S. Government.


Eli Thayer to John Brown

Eli Thayer to John Brown
Creator: Thayer, Eli, 1819-1899
Date: March 19, 1857
In this brief follow up to his March 18 letter, Eli Thayer wrote Brown to say that "next Monday" would be a good time for Brown's speech on "the free State Cause of Kansas which is the Cause of mankind" in Worcester.


Facts proved by figures showing what prohibition has done for Kansas

Facts proved by figures showing what prohibition has done for Kansas
Creator: Stubbs, Walter Roscoe, 1858-1929
Date: March 27, 1910
A speech by Governor Walter Stubbs on prohibition's effect on Kansas, delivered at The Great Northern Theatre in Chicago, Illinois, on March 27, 1910.


Fellow Citizens--In Support of the Wyandotte Constitution

Fellow Citizens--In Support of the Wyandotte Constitution
Creator: Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889
Date: July, 1859
This eleven-page document is a speech or essay, most likely in John Alexander Martin's handwriting, delivered in support of the proposed Wyandotte Constitution that was ratified by the voters of the territory on October 4, 1859. Martin, a twenty-year-old Atchison editor, served as secretary for the convention, which finished its work at the end of July. This speech, attacking the Democrats for conspiring to defeat the latest free-state constitution and for "the Lecomptonizing of Kansas," was undoubtedly delivered several times during the months of August and September, 1859. It addressed the various issues opponents were likely to use to defeat the constitution at the polls and stressed that, in light of actions of "a servile judiciary," slavery could not be removed from Kansas until it was admitted as a "sovereign state."


Final address to Populists

Final address to Populists
Creator: Peoples Party State Central Committee
Date: 1896
This pamphlet issued by the Populist Party's state central committee for Kansas includes a political address outlining key issues leading up to the 1896 election. The subtitle reads "The Scheme of Wall Street to Defeat Silver Unmasked--Arthur Sewall the Tool."


First Thanksgiving Sermon

First Thanksgiving Sermon
Creator: McVicar, Peter, 1829-1903
Date: November 29, 1860
This sermon by Rev. Peter McVicar's sermons is entitled "First Thanksgiving Sermon." It was delivered in Topeka on November 29, 1860, just weeks after he assumed the pastorate of the Congregational Church. McVicar focused on the concept that God's blessings were not to be measured by the accumulation of money or property, making specific comments about Kansas. He suggested, for example, that citizens of Kansas Territory who gathered together on that day should be especially thankful for the hardships endured by "early" settlers in order to establish freedom from slavery.


Friends in the radio audience

Friends in the radio audience
Creator: Capper, Arthur, 1865-1951
Date: June 19, 1939
In this script for his radio broadcast, Senator Arthur Capper argues that the U.S. must avoid becoming involved in the conflict developing in Europe and the Far East. Capper also maintains that the Roosevelt Administration's growing desire to support U.S. allies involved in the conflict, as well as the Navy's request for expanded overseas basing, are signs that the nation is headed toward involvement in a conflict that it should avoid.


Governor's Message vetoing the Kickapoo ferry

Governor's Message vetoing the Kickapoo ferry
Creator: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: July 21, 1855
This item is a printed letter by Governor Andrew Reeder to the legislature, informing them that he had vetoed the bill to incorporate a ferry in Kickapoo, Kansas Territory. Reeder reminds the legislature that they were to meet at Ft. Leavenworth and not at the Shawnee Manual Labor School.


Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, invitations and speeches

Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, invitations and speeches
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)
Date: 1929-1931
This file includes subject correspondence relating to invitations and speeches given by and for Governor Reed. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.


Governor George Hodges speech

Governor George Hodges speech
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1913-1915 : Hodges)
Date: January 15, 1913
Governor Hodges gave this speech to the Kansas House of Representatives discouraging the possible passage of a Jim Crow law. Many black Kansans were afraid these laws were going to be passed in Kansas particularly because Oklahoma had so many already in place. Governor Hodges urged that this law or any other of its kind should not be passed. In the end, the Jim Crow law failed to pass.


Governor George Monroe Beebe, annual message

Governor George Monroe Beebe, annual message
Creator: Beebe, George Monroe 1836-1927
Date: January 10, 1861
George Beebe assumed the title of Acting Governor of Kansas Territory upon the resignation of Samuel Medary. In this printed message from the Executive Office, Kansas Territory (Lecompton) to the territorial legislature, Beebe commented on Medary and other issues relating to Kansas Territory. He included information from the auditor about the amount of taxes that had been collected. He also referenced the pending dissolution of the Union and the "gloom" that brought to all.


Governor Robert Bennett draft of address to the 1978 Kansas Legislature

Governor Robert Bennett draft of address to the 1978 Kansas Legislature
Creator: Bennett, Robert F. (Robert Frederick), 1927-
Date: December 15, 1977
Governor Robert F. Bennett of Topeka, Kansas works on a first draft of his annual address to the Kansas Legislature. This excerpt of his draft concerns state population trends. Governor Bennett claims that in 1975-1976 more people moved to Kansas than left it, reversing a consistent trend of out-migration since 1900. The Governor's first draft includes seven paragraphs on the subject of population while the finished address includes only four sentences.


It's time to ditch the New Deal

It's time to ditch the New Deal
Creator: Capper, Arthur, 1865-1951
Date: October 29, 1938
This copy of a speech given by Senator Arthur Capper of Kansas at Hutchinson, Kansas, details the reasons why he believes the U.S. must move away from President Roosevelt's New Deal. Primarily, Capper argues that the U.S. must be careful in order to preserve democracy and "local self government in local affairs." If not, Capper contends that the U.S. could become like some nations in Europe where the individual is "merely an atom, a vassal of the state." For Capper, therefore, the major question of the day was whether the people would maintain the primary role in running the nation, or if the government was going to be allowed to "run the people."


James Henry Hammond of South Carolina, speech

James Henry Hammond of South Carolina, speech
Creator: Hammond, James H.
Date: March 4, 1858
Senator James Hammond offered this speech as a rebuttal to those recently presented by Senators in oppositon to his perspective, questioning their argument that the Lecompton Constitutional Convention was a tool of the Territorial Government to maintain the dominance of proslavery policy. Hammond maintained instead that the Convention was "an assembly of the people in their highest sovereign capacity" and thus acted with the will of the majority of Kansas citizens. He also indicated that the South did not feel threated by the possibility of Kansas becoming a free state, as their exports and businesses were well off even without the increased foreign slave trade that Kansas potentially could bring.


James Stanley Emery speeches

James Stanley Emery speeches
Creator: Emery, James S., 1826-1899
Date: 1876-1897
Several addresses written and given by James Stanley Emery. He spoke to a number of audiences at Kansas universities and clubs on religion, history, and other similar topics. James Stanley Emery was born in Franklin County, Maine in 1826. Educated at Waterville College, he was admitted to the bar in New York in 1854. Involved with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, Emery came to Kansas with the second party of immigrants to ensure that it became an anti-slavery state when it entered the Union. He worked in numerous states for the cause through the following years. Emery was a member of the Leavenworth constitutional convention and served on the Kansas Legislature in 1862 and 1863. He was a lawyer and also worked as a journalist for the New York Daily Times. President Abraham Lincoln appointed Emery U.S. District Attorney for Kansas in 1864. In 1891 he was president of the Kansas State Historical Society. Emery died in Lawrence in 1899.


James William Denver, Address to the people of Kansas

James William Denver, Address to the people of Kansas
Creator: Denver, James William, 1817-1892
Date: December 21, 1857
Initial address from Gov. Denver indicating his instructions from the president.


John Brown Speech

John Brown Speech
Creator: Brown, John, 1800-1859
Date: Around March, 1857
During the spring of 1857, John Brown traveled to several Northeastern cities (specifically, in Brown's home state of Connecticut) to solicit financial support for the Kansas crusade. In the speech delivered from these handwritten notes, Brown outlined some of the many sacrifices he and others had made to give his audience a sense of what was needed and discussed the unfolding situation in Kansas Territory.


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