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A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin

A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin
Creator: Campbell, A. B.
Date: April 4, 1886
The Kansas adjutant general at Parsons sends a telegram to Governor John Martin of Topeka asking the governor for permission to furnish the mayor of Parsons with one hundred guns to preserve peace in the city. A strike of railroad workers on the Missouri Pacific Railroad at Parsons led company and city officials to ask the governor to arm citizens and for call out the militia.


A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin

A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin
Creator: Campbell, A. B.
Date: April 1, 1886
A.B. Campbell, Kansas Adjutant General, of Parsons, telegrams Kansas Governor John Martin, of Topeka, stating that another railroad engine has been killed and that he is leaving to investigate. This is in response to the local authority's request for National Guard troops during the railroad strike in the three state area.


A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin

A.B. Campbell to Governor John Martin
Creator: Campbell, A. B.
Date: April 9, 1886
Adjutant General Colonel A. B. Campbell of Parsons, Kansas, writes Kansas Governor John Martin of Topeka. He informs the governor that citizens are putting together a force of fifty special police to respond to striking railroad workers. Railroad employees at Parsons were striking and the governor granted permission to provide citizens with arms to keep the peace.


A.O. Brown to Governor John Martin

A.O. Brown to Governor John Martin
Creator: Brown, A.O.
Date: March 30, 1886
A.O. Brown, mayor of Parsons, Kansas, telegrams Kansas Governor john Martin, of Topeka, requesting immediate help from the "troops" over a labor dispute. Strikers had driven a freight train off the tracks near Parsons. In February 1885, railroad shop workers walked off the job because of a cut in pay and reduced hours of work. Governor Martin was able to negotiate a settlement to the strike but problems continued throughout Kansas, Missouri, and Texas.


C. B. Woodward to Governor John Martin

C. B. Woodward to Governor John Martin
Creator: Woodward, C.B.
Date: March 13, 1886
Labette County sheriff, C.B. Woodward, tells Kansas Governor John Martin of Topeka he is unable to control the strikers who have captured the train engines by force. He is requesting military support. In February 1885, railroad shop workers walked off the job because of a cut in pay and reduced hours of work. Governor Martin was able to negotiate a settlement to the strike but problems continued throughout Kansas, Missouri, and Texas.


Colonel A. B. Campbell to Governor John Martin

Colonel A. B. Campbell to Governor John Martin
Creator: Campbell, A. B.
Date: March 31, 1886
Kansas adjutant general Colonel A. B. Campbell writes to Kansas governor John Martin concerning striking railroad workers. The state militia had been called into service as a result of disruption of train service and alleged threats to public safety. Campbell explains that the "statements in the telegrams of the Mayor and Sheriff are not overdrawn. The sheriff was slapped in the face and spit upon. The mob undertook to drag Kimball from the engine and but for the timely arrival of the train of passengers and mail, there would have been a furious assault." Railroad strikers refused to allow freight trains to run following information received from Texas where several striking workers had not been rehired in that state, thus violating conditions of the strike. Federal and state law prohibited interruption of passenger and mail cars leaving freight cars vulnerable during the strike.


Correspondence to David Kelso from Governor John Martin

Correspondence to David Kelso from Governor John Martin
Creator: Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889
Date: March 13, 1886
In this correspondence, Governor Martin tells David Kelso, attorney, that the sheriff of Labette County must exhaust all the civil powers of his office before military support can be sent.


David Kelso to Governor John Martin

David Kelso to Governor John Martin
Creator: Kelso, David
Date: March 30, 1886
In this telegram, David Kelso, attorney for the Missouri Pacific Railway, tells Governor John Martin the strike has become vicious. A mob has been involved in lifting rails, destroying property, and people are becoming afraid as local authorities cannot contain the violence. The railroad strike of 1886 occurred after reports of layoffs affecting Missouri Pacific workers in Texas reached the railroad engineers and shop workers in Kansas.


Draft basis of settlement

Draft basis of settlement
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1885-1889: Martin)
Date: March 1886
This document from Kansas Governor John Martin's correspondence may have been written by the Knights of Labor and outlines eleven demands termed the "basis of settlement" for strike negotiations. The railroad strike of 1886 resulted from failed negotiations between railroad management, mechanics, and shop workers dating back to October 1884 when workers were notified of a 10% pay reduction. This made them the lowest paid railroad workers in the tristate area (Missouri, Arkansas, and Kansas). A few months later, hours were also reduced. Workers argued they could not support their families.


F.E. Shaw to Governor John Martin

F.E. Shaw to Governor John Martin
Creator: Shaw, F.E.
Date: March 26, 1886
F.E. Shaw, Sheriff of Atchison County, writes Kansas Governor John Martin of Topeka regarding striking railroad workers. Shaw states that he will protect the railroad property that belongs to the city and county if the railway company will supply men to do the work necessary to get the trains running. The railroad strike of 1886 occurred after reports of layoffs affecting Missouri Pacific workers in Texas reached the railroad engineers and shop workers in Kansas. Although the governor had been successful in negotiating the end of an earlier strike in 1885, problems continued and public support waned.


F. H. Belton to Governor John Martin

F. H. Belton to Governor John Martin
Creator: Belton, F.H.
Date: April 12, 1886
Railroad commissioner F.H. Belton writes to Kansas Governor Martin of Topeka from Kansas City, Missouri. Belton tells Governor Martin that there are a number of laborers at work at Cypress yards, and a lot of "green switch men, but skilled mechanics are very scare". Concerned about disorder and lack of progress during the strike of 1886, Belton reports "out of order" cars are rapidly accumulating on the side tracks. Few section men are at work. In February 1885, railroad shop workers walked off the job because of a cut in pay and reduced hours of work. Governor Martin was able to negotiate a settlement to the strike but problems continued throughout Kansas, Missouri, and Texas.


Fellow Citizens--In Support of the Wyandotte Constitution

Fellow Citizens--In Support of the Wyandotte Constitution
Creator: Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889
Date: July, 1859
This eleven-page document is a speech or essay, most likely in John Alexander Martin's handwriting, delivered in support of the proposed Wyandotte Constitution that was ratified by the voters of the territory on October 4, 1859. Martin, a twenty-year-old Atchison editor, served as secretary for the convention, which finished its work at the end of July. This speech, attacking the Democrats for conspiring to defeat the latest free-state constitution and for "the Lecomptonizing of Kansas," was undoubtedly delivered several times during the months of August and September, 1859. It addressed the various issues opponents were likely to use to defeat the constitution at the polls and stressed that, in light of actions of "a servile judiciary," slavery could not be removed from Kansas until it was admitted as a "sovereign state."


G. B. Woodford to Governor John Martin

G. B. Woodford to Governor John Martin
Creator: Woodward, C.B.
Date: April 1, 1886
In this letter, the local authorities of Labette County, Kansas, plead with Kansas governor John Martin for militia support to preserve order in Parsons during the railroad strike of 1886. In February 1885, railroad shop workers walked off the job because of a cut in pay and reduced hours of work. Governor Martin was able to negotiate a settlement to the strike but problems continued throughout Kansas, Missouri, and Texas.


General Order No. 10

General Order No. 10
Creator: Kansas. Militia
Date: August 29, 1861
General Order No. 10, dated August 29, 1861, addresses the formation and organization of the Kansas Home Guard regiment created after the issuance of Major General John C. Fremont's General Order No. 9. It also lists the superintendents who will oversee the organization of the companies from Leavenworth, Atchison, White Cloud, Hiawatha, Grasshopper Falls, Junction City, Topeka, Emporia, Lawrence, and Wyandotte. In addition, General Order No. 10 mentions that Colonel W.R. Judon, of Fort Scott, is raising another regiment of Home Guards in which loyal Kansans may serve.


George W. Espey to Governor John A. Martin

George W. Espey to Governor John A. Martin
Date: March 30, 1887
George W. Espey, an agent of the Palace Drug Store in Ashland, Kansas, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka asking whether he must quit selling alcohol because the county clerk does not have the proper affidavit form for him to fill out to renew his license. Espey asks for a prompt reply because the county attorney has stopped him from doing business.


Governor's proclamation on organization of Thomas County, Kansas

Governor's proclamation on organization of Thomas County, Kansas
Date: October 8, 1885
These two pages are copies of the sealed but unsigned proclamation on the organization of Thomas County, Kansas by Governor Martin. Because the county had 1916 inhabitants, of whom 777 were heads of households, it met the requirements for becoming an official Kansas county. The proclamation declares Colby the temporary county seat of Thomas County.


Governor John A. Martin to the Honorable Board of Railroad Commissioners

Governor John A. Martin to the Honorable Board of Railroad Commissioners
Creator: Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889
Date: March 10, 1885
Kansas Governor John Martin of Topeka writes to the Kansas Board of Railroad Commissioners concerning "very serious troubles have arisen at Atchison and Parsons between the Missouri Pacific Railway company and certain of its employees." Railroad workers were on strike and the governor has just received word that a mob has taken control of the trains.


Governor John Alexander Martin

Governor John Alexander Martin
Creator: Leonard & Martin
Date: Between 1885 and 1889
This is a cabinet card of Kansas Governor John Alexander Martin. He was a Republican from Atchison, Kansas and served from January 12, 1885 to January 14, 1889.


Governor John Martin to Colonel A.B. Campbell

Governor John Martin to Colonel A.B. Campbell
Creator: Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889
Date: April 5, 1886
Kansas Governor John A. Martin of Topeka telegrams Adjutant General Colonel A. B. Campbell of Parsons about conditions in Parsons during the 1886 Missouri Pacific Railway Strike. Colonel Campbell has written the governor asking permission to provide arms for the citizens of Parsons to protect the peace. In this telegram, Governor Martin asks the Colonel if it would "be better for the citizens to organize a militia company under command of Major Kniffin or some other experienced officer?"


Governor John Martin to Colonel A.B. Campbell

Governor John Martin to Colonel A.B. Campbell
Creator: Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889
Date: March 31, 1886
Kansas Governor John Martin updates the adjutant general on negotiations between the Knights of Labor Union and the railroads. In this letter, the governor reports that the Knights of Labor issued an order for the strikers to return to work and that a settlement for the strike is underway.


Governor John Martin to Colonel A.B. Campbell

Governor John Martin to Colonel A.B. Campbell
Creator: Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889
Date: March 15, 1886
In this telegram to Colonel Campbell, Kansas Governor John Martin of Topeka responds to a request for militia units at Parsons, Kansas, to help maintain order during a strike of railroad workers. The governor does not favor using the militia except in the "direst necessity." He asks Colonel Campbell to insist that the sheriff and people of Labette County, Kansas, preserve the peace. In February 1885, railroad shop workers walked off the job because of a cut in pay and reduced hours of work. Governor Martin was able to negotiate a settlement to the strike but problems continued throughout Kansas, Missouri, and Texas.


Governor John Martin to Colonel A. B. Campbell

Governor John Martin to Colonel A. B. Campbell
Creator: Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889
Date: April 14, 1886
In this letter, Kansas Governor John Martin is asking Colonel Campbell to travel to Parsons, Kansas, to determine if military support is necessary to control unrest related to the railroad strike. Governor Martin has been sympathetic with the strikers and urges the Colonel to find a peaceful settlement. In February 1885, railroad shop workers walked off the job because of a cut in pay and reduced hours of work. Governor Martin was able to negotiate a settlement to the strike but problems continued throughout Kansas, Missouri, and Texas.


Governor John Martin to Colonel B.B. Campbell

Governor John Martin to Colonel B.B. Campbell
Creator: Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889
Date: April 2, 1886
Kansas Governor John Martin of Topeka writes to the adjutant general with detailed instructions on how to proceed when calling the state militia into active service. The Sheriff of Labette County and the Mayor of Parsons, Kansas, requested the militia presence in response to striking railroad workers. The governor had been notified of disturbances in Parsons related to the 1886 railroad strike which the governor believed to be settled. In this letter, the governor clearly states "The purpose to be subserved is not to make war upon citizens, but to aid the civil authorities of the county of Labette and the city of Parsons, in preserving peace and order?"


Governor John Martin to Governor John Marmaduke

Governor John Martin to Governor John Marmaduke
Creator: Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889
Date: March 17, 1886
In this telegram, Kansas Governor John Martin asks Missouri Governor John Marmaduke to join him in being a mediator in ending the railroad strike. In February 1885, railroad shop workers walked off the job because of a cut in pay and reduced hours of work. Governor Martin was able to negotiate a settlement to the strike but problems continued throughout Kansas, Missouri, and Texas.


Governor John Martin to the sheriffs, county attorneys and other peace officers of the State of Kansas

Governor John Martin to the sheriffs, county attorneys and other peace officers of the State of Kansas
Creator: Martin, John Alexander, 1839-1889
Date: March 25, 1886
In this draft letter, Kansas Governor John Martin of Topeka calls upon local county and city officials to discharge their duties to preserve the peace, protect property and see that commerce of the state is not interrupted by violence or lawless acts. This activity takes place during the railroad strike of 1886 where strike activities have led to a serious disruption of community and business life. Although the governor had been hesitant to draft a proclamation condemning the disruption, numerous petitions from private citizens and local officials across the state ultimately forced his hand.


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