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Campaign songs, as sung by the National Quartette

Campaign songs, as sung by the National Quartette
Date: 1892
This volume of campaign songs includes four pieces that vividly express the major beliefs of the Populist Party. The first song, "For Trampling on the Grass," criticizes the businessmen and bankers who were trampling on the rights of the common people. The second song, "The Republican's Lament," pokes fun at the Republicans who were no longer able to dominate the Populists now that "they have ceased to head our whippings, and have ceased to take our word." The third song, "The Wall Street Badge" describes how the government, according to the Populists, was now in the hands of Wall Street. The final song, "One of His Legs is Longer Than It Really Ought to Be," provides a comic perspective on some of the upcoming elections, including the race between Chester I. Long and "Sockless Jerry" Simpson.


Executive Order No. 2, Governor Lorenzo Lewelling

Executive Order No. 2, Governor Lorenzo Lewelling
Creator: Lewelling, Lorenzo Dow, 1846-1900
Date: February 15, 1893
Kansas governor Lorenzo Lewelling issued this executive order in response to the standoff that would become known as the Legislative War of 1893. During this conflict, the Republican (Douglass) House and the Populist (Dunsmore) House both claimed to have been the legally elected House of Representatives for the state. Consequently, both attempted to conduct business in Representative Hall, ignoring the presence of each other and spending day and night in the chambers to prevent the other side from gaining control. On February 13, 1893, however, the Populists barricaded the hall while the Republicans were away, preventing the Republican congressmen from re-entering the chambers. The Republican house responded by battering the hall doors with sledgehammers and posting armed guards to protect the hall. At that point Governor Lewelling issued this order, demanding that the Republicans disband and "vacate such Hall and the approaches thereunto under penalty of forcible expulsion." The Republicans refused, and after a tense standoff, on February 25 the Kansas Supreme Court affirmed the validity of the Republican House, thus ending the "war."


Executive circular to metropolitan police commissioners

Executive circular to metropolitan police commissioners
Creator: Lewelling, Lorenzo Dow, 1846-1900
Date: December 4, 1893
With this circular, Governor Lorenzo Dow Lewelling of Topeka, Kansas, appeals to police commissioners of Kansas cities to show restraint in the prosecution of the unemployed. The governor argues that high rates of unemployment are a product of the industrial system of production and not the fault of individuals. Since jobs are not available to all employable persons, he argues, unemployed persons should not be treated as criminals. The governor denounces the vagrancy law for first class cities included in the General Statutes of 1889, and similar city ordinances, which allowed for the arrest, imprisonment, or fine of "all vagrants, tramps, and confidence men and persons found in said city without visible means of support, or some legitimate business." The Kansas Legislature originally enacted the law in 1881. Governor Lewelling was the first People's Party (Populist) candidate to become governor. Republican opponents of the Populist governor dubbed this letter the "Tramp Circular."


Governor Lorenzo Dow Lewelling's inauguration

Governor Lorenzo Dow Lewelling's inauguration
Creator: Farrow, W. F.
Date: February 10, 1893
A photograph showing the inaugural ceremony for Governor Lorenzo Lewelling held in the Kansas House of Representatives. Lewelling, a Populist, served from 1893 to 1895. It was during his term that a dispute between the Populists and Republicans erupted and both parties separated and formed their own houses. This separation of the political parties in the House of Representatives is often called the legislative "war" of 1893.


Governor Lorenzo Lewelling, Claims, 1893

Governor Lorenzo Lewelling, Claims, 1893
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1893-1895: Lewelling)
Date: January 27, 1893
This folder contains correspondence on claims made in 1893 to Governor Lewelling's office. This specific claim deals with Price's Raid.


Governor Lorenzo Lewelling, Correspondence, Box 1

Governor Lorenzo Lewelling, Correspondence, Box 1
Creator: Lewelling, Lorenzo Dow, 1846-1900
Date: 1893-1895
These folders contain correspondence subject files with Governor Lewelling, twelfth governor of the State of Kansas, 1893-1895, and the first Populist governor of the state. Correspondence received includes general letters, official response letters and letters concerning State agencies and subject files. Some proclamations are also included. Subject files include applications, endorsements, and remonstrances relating to candidates for appointments to the Kansas State Normal School (Emporia) (present Emporia State University), the Kansas State Penitentiary (present Lansing Correctional Facility), judicial, & other positions; county organizational documents; and letters relating to counties, crime and criminals, justices of the peace, lands, military affairs, relief aid, Prohibition law, and other topics.


Governor Lorenzo Lewelling, Correspondence, Box 2

Governor Lorenzo Lewelling, Correspondence, Box 2
Creator: Lewelling, Lorenzo Dow, 1846-1900
Date: 1892-1894
These folders contain correspondence subject files with Governor Lewelling, twelfth governor of the State of Kansas, 1893-1895, and the first Populist governor of the state. Subjects included are applications for jobs, endorsements, and remonstrances, as well as appointments to State positions; bonds; charitable and correctional institutions; cities and towns; claims; counties and county organization; crime and criminals, extraditions, and rewards; fairs; immigration; Indians; invitations; Indian, school, railroad, & other land; legislation; federal and State military affairs; railroads; relief; aerial navigation, forestry, livestock, pharmaceuticals, mines, silk, the State soldiers (orphans) home, and the United States government.


Governor Lorenzo Lewelling, Correspondence, Box 3

Governor Lorenzo Lewelling, Correspondence, Box 3
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1893-1895: Lewelling)
Date: 1893-1894
These folders contain correspondence subject files with Governor Lewelling, twelfth governor of the State of Kansas, 1893-1895, and the first Populist governor of the state. Subjects included are fairs, legislation, military affairs, mining operations, oil inspector, railroads, resources for Western Kansas, and tramp letters.


Governor Lorenzo Lewelling executive order no. 3

Governor Lorenzo Lewelling executive order no. 3
Creator: Lewelling, Lorenzo Dow, 1846-1900
Date: February 16, 1893
Kansas governor Lorenzo Lewelling issued this order to Colonel Hughes, a militia commander, ordering him to clear the Topeka statehouse of all Republican congressmen and to forcibly remove anyone who did not comply. During the Legislative War of 1893, the Republican (Douglass) House and the Populist (Dunsmore) House had both claimed to be the legally elected House of Representatives for the state. On February 13, 1893, the Populists barricaded themselves in Representative Hall, preventing the Republican congressmen from re-entering the chambers. The Republican house responded by beating down the doors with sledgehammers, taking possession of the chambers, and posting armed guards to protect the hall. At that point, Governor Lewelling issued his order demanding that the Republicans disband, and the next day, February 16, he issued this order to Colonel Hughes. Hughes, a Republican, refused to obey and was relieved of his command. His militia (with a new commander) stationed themselves outside the capitol but were not re-ordered to clear the building. The situation was resolved on February 25 when the Kansas Supreme Court established the Republican House as the legal representative body for the state.


Jeremiah Simpson political ribbon

Jeremiah Simpson political ribbon
Date: between 1892 and 1893
Jeremiah (Jerry) Simpson (1842-1905) served in the Civil War and moved to Barber County near Medicine Lodge, Kansas in 1878. He unsuccessfully ran for the Kansas House of Representatives on the Independent ticket twice, but served two terms as a populist from 1891-1895 and one term from 1897-1899. Lorenzo Dow Lewelling (1846-1900) moved from Salem, Iowa to Wichita, Kansas in 1887. In 1892 he was elected and served as the populist governor of Kansas. In 1894 he was nominated for a second term but the platform declared in favor of woman suffrage, which alienated Democratic support, and this, together with the recollections of the stormy scenes attending the opening days of his administration, encompassed his defeat. Beginning in 1896 he served in the Kansas senate until his death in Arkansas City, Kansas in 1900.


Kansas Adjutant General miscellaneous correspondence

Kansas Adjutant General miscellaneous correspondence
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1893
Correspondence sent and received by Kansas Adjutant General Henry H. Artz. Many of the letters are addressed to Governor Lorenzo D. Lewelling. Correspondence includes letters from former Adjutant General Alexander B. Campbell in his new position working for the Department of Kansas Grand Army of the Republic, and Captain George W. Jackson of the Garfield Rifles, a colored regiment in Leavenworth, seeking additional uniforms and arms.


Kansas Legislature 1893

Kansas Legislature 1893
Date: 1893
This is a photograph showing members of the Senate and House in the 1893 Kansas Legislature. The House was divided between the Populists and Republicans. Each representative and senator is identified with their district number. Also, photographs of Governor Lorenzo Dow Lewelling and Lieutenant Governor Percy Daniels appear on the photograph.


Lewelling's Position

Lewelling's Position
Creator: Topeka Populist
Date: January 20, 1893
During the "Populist War" of 1893, Governor Lorenzo Lewelling released this statement regarded the rightful members of the legislature who where, in his opinion, the Populists (known as the Dunsmore House). He writes that the Populists had a right to question the election because "constitutional and statutory provisions were not only disregarded but intentionally violated by those who had it in their power under form of law to rob the people of their rights." Here he is referring to the Republicans. Ultimately, as Lewelling writes, the decision would be up to the Kansas Supreme Court. This conflict had begun when two sets of legislators, one Populist and one Republican, both claimed to be the legitimately elected body. Fighting ensued in the halls of the statehouse and in Representative Hall, and Lewelling was forced to call out the National Guard to keep the peace. Ultimately, after twelve tense days, the Supreme Court determined that the Republican House (also called the Douglass House) was the rightful occupant of Representative Hall.


Lewelling political medal

Lewelling political medal
Date: 1892
Lorenzo Dow Lewelling (1846-1900) moved from Salem, Iowa to Wichita, Kansas in 1887. In 1892 he was elected and served as the populist governor of Kansas. In 1894 he was nominated for a second term but the platform declared in favor of woman suffrage, which alienated Democratic support, and this, together with the recollections of the stormy scenes attending the opening days of his administration, encompassed his defeat. Beginning in 1896 he served in the Kansas senate until his death in Arkansas City, Kansas in 1900.


Lewelling political medal

Lewelling political medal
Date: 1892
Lorenzo Dow Lewelling (1846-1900) moved from Salem, Iowa to Wichita, Kansas in 1887. In 1892 he was elected and served as the populist governor of Kansas. In 1894 he was nominated for a second term but the platform declared in favor of woman suffrage, which alienated Democratic support, and this, together with the recollections of the stormy scenes attending the opening days of his administration, encompassed his defeat. Beginning in 1896 he served in the Kansas senate until his death in Arkansas City, Kansas in 1900. The July 1892 Omaha convention defined the basic tenets of the populist movement and made several specific proposals such as the graduated income tax, the secret ballot, the direct election of senators, and the 8 hour work day.


Lewelling political ribbon

Lewelling political ribbon
Date: 1892
LoLorenzo Dow Lewelling (1846-1900) moved from Salem, Iowa to Wichita, Kansas in 1887. In 1892 he was elected and served as the populist governor of Kansas. In 1894 he was nominated for a second term but the platform declared in favor of woman suffrage, which alienated Democratic support, and this, together with the recollections of the stormy scenes attending the opening days of his administration, encompassed his defeat. Beginning in 1896 he served in the Kansas senate until his death in Arkansas City, Kansas in 1900. The July 4,1892 Omaha convention defined the basic tenets of the populist movement and made several specific proposals such as the graduated income tax, the secret ballot, the direct election of senators, and the 8 hour work day.


Lewelling political ribbon

Lewelling political ribbon
Date: 1892
Lorenzo Dow Lewelling (1846-1900) moved from Salem, Iowa to Wichita, Kansas in 1887. In 1892 he was elected and served as the populist governor of Kansas. In 1894 he was nominated for a second term but the platform declared in favor of woman suffrage, which alienated Democratic support, and this, together with the recollections of the stormy scenes attending the opening days of his administration, encompassed his defeat. Beginning in 1896 he served in the Kansas senate until his death in Arkansas City, Kansas in 1900.


Lorenzo Dow Lewelling

Lorenzo Dow Lewelling
Date: Between 1893 and 1895
This photograph represents Lorenzo Dow Lewelling (1846-1900). Born and raised in the Quaker lifestyle in Iowa, Lewelling moved to Wichita, Kansas in 1887, after working a variety of jobs and serving in the Civil War with his second wife and child from his first marriage. As a founding member of the Farmers' Alliance, Lewelling ran as a Populist for the 1892 governor's race. Notable events during his administration was the "Populist War" in 1883, clash with activist Mary Elizabeth Lease over the fusion of the Populists and Democrats, and removing Lease from her position as President of the Kansas Board of Charities. Failing to be re-elected as governor, Lewelling was elected to the Kansas State Senate, a position he held until his death.


Memoranda on the Populist War

Memoranda on the Populist War
Creator: Lewelling, Lorenzo Dow, 1846-1900
Date: February 17, 1893
This memorandum details the agreement between Populist governor Lorenzo Lewelling and the Republican (Douglass) House that ended the standoff known as the Legislative (or Populist) War of 1893. During this conflict, the Republican Party and the Populist Party both claimed to have a legal majority in the state House of Representatives, coming to blows over possession of Representative Hall in the statehouse. Among other things, this agreement dictated that "no arrests -- be made by either House," and that the militia be disbanded before more soldiers arrived in Topeka. Attached to the agreement is a statement by George Douglass, leader of the Republicans, stating that this memorandum was not intended to determine which house was legitimately elected. Both documents were signed by Governor Lewelling, Douglas, D. W. Eastman, and J. K. Cubbison. Also attached is a letter from Lewelling to George Martin, head of the Kansas State Historical Society; Lewelling wanted to ensure that a copy of the document would be preserved for posterity.


Official railroad map of Kansas 1899

Official railroad map of Kansas 1899
Creator: Matthews-Northrup Co., Buffalo, N.Y.
Date: 1899
This map shows the railroad lines that crossed Kansas in 1890. It was issued by the Kansas State Board of Railroad Commissioners. W. P. Dillard was the chair and the other members were L. W. Lewelling and W. M. Campbell. The secretary to the Commission was J. M. Senter and the clerk was Richard Coyle.


Political cartoon by Myron A. Waterman

Political cartoon by Myron A. Waterman
Creator: Waterman, Myron A.
Date: between 1893 and 1895
Political cartoon by Myron A. Waterman (1855-1937). Governor Lewelling (1846-1900) stands over the wounded or slain body of Labor while E.N. Morrill (1834-1909) lurks in the background. Waterman first gained recognition as a political cartoonist and illustrator in the early 1890s while working as the editor of the Fort Scott Lantern. He held a number of other occupations throughout his life including working in the drug store business and serving as a deputy state bank commissioner of Kansas from 1894 to 1901. Waterman was a staunch prohibitionist and a member of the First Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, moving there from Fort Scott in 1893. In 1901 or 1902 he relocated to Kansas City, Kansas.


Reminiscence of the 1893 legislative war

Reminiscence of the 1893 legislative war
Creator: Bull, Floyd R.
Date: July 15, 1955
In this reminiscence, Floyd R. Bull, a member of the El Dorado company of the Kansas National Guard, recalls his involvment in the Legislative (or Populist) War of 1893. During this conflict, violence broke out between the competing legislative houses--the Republican (Douglass) House and the Populist (Dunsmore) House--prompting Populist Governor Lorenzo Lewelling to call the National Guard to the capitol. On February 25 the Kansas Supreme Court affirmed the validity of the Republican House, thus ending the "war." This reminiscence is a copy of an earlier statement by Bull, written in 1938.


Susan Orcutt to Governor Lorenzo Dow Lewelling

Susan Orcutt to Governor Lorenzo Dow Lewelling
Creator: Orcutt, Susan
Date: June 29, 1894
A letter written to Kansas Governor Lorenzo Dow Lewelling of Topeka by Susan Orcutt of Mendota, Kansas, telling him about their depressed situation in Trego County. Orcutt tells Lewelling that she and her husband are starving because hail ruined their crops and garden and her husband could not find work.


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