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A. J. Beach to Samuel N. Wood

A. J. Beach to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Beach, A. J.
Date: April 22, 1860
Writing from Beach Valley (Rice County) in Kansas Territory, A. J. Beach requests Samuel Wood's legal advice with regard to Beach's options in a bridge dispute. It seemed that Beach had received a charter to build a toll bridge [over Cow Creek], and another party (William Edwards, et al) put up a "temporary" one before his was finished. They were now diverting traffic away from Beach's completed bridge. "I wish to know if anything can be done with them at law . . ."


A. J. Beach to Samuel N. Wood

A. J. Beach to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Beach, A. J.
Date: May 6, 1860
As in his earlier letter to Samuel Wood of April 22, A. J. Beach, of Beach Valley, Kansas Territory, describes his Cow Creek bridge dispute with William Edwards and O. G. Stanley. In this letter, Beach officially retains the services of Wood & Perkins to sue Edwards and Stanley for damages. "I can prove," wrote Beach, "that they have asked trains to cross their bridge, taken toll on it, and repaired it with the avowed intention of making it a free bridge and taking the travel away from mine." Beach claims to be losing $20 a day in tolls.


Alexander C. Spilman to Samuel N. Wood

Alexander C. Spilman to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Spillman, A. C.
Date: January 14, 1861
From Salina, Alexander Carraway Spilman wrote "as one of your [Wood's] constituents" regarding his opposition to a Junction City proposal that to change the boundary line between Dickinson and Davis counties to increase the size of the former at the expense of the latter. Spilman believed "A change in the lines of Dickinson would necessarily involve a change in the lines of Saline which is something that must not be done under any circumstances."


Charles Langston to Samuel Wood

Charles Langston to Samuel Wood
Creator: Langston, Charles
Date: June 20, 1867
This letter was written to Samuel Wood from Charles Langston, the leader of the black male suffrage movement in Kansas. Langston addressed two issues; removing the word white from the Kansas Constitution and women's suffrage. The word white prohibited black males from voting in Kansas leaving them powerless. Although Langston did support women's suffrage, he felt their movement was hampering the progress of black male suffrage. Therefore, he was not going to speak on the issue of women's suffrage. Like many Kansans during this time, Langston thought women should wait their turn for their right to vote. Samuel Wood was an influential politician and a supporter of women's suffrage but not black male suffrage. Black men were unable to vote in Kansas until the passing of the fifteenth amendment in 1870.


Charles Langston to Samuel Wood

Charles Langston to Samuel Wood
Creator: Langston, Charles
Date: April 7, 1867
Charles Langston, Leavenworth, Kansas, wrote this letter to Samuel Wood, Cottonwood Falls, Kansas, in response to a letter Wood had written him on April 4, 1867, concerning a suffrage convention in Topeka. Langston was unable to attend and felt misrepresented. Wood claimed Langston thought supporters of female suffrage opposed Negro suffrage, which was not the case. Langston went on to explain that he needed Wood's financial help to secure black male voting rights. Enclosed at the end of the letter is a petition from the State Executive Committee of Colored Men. This proposition asked for two things; a vote in the fall election to remove the word white from the state constitution and funds to further the black male suffrage cause. The vote to remove the word white did not pass in the fall of 1867. Black men had to wait three more years before they received their right to vote in Kansas elections. Charles Langston later served as the principal of the Normal School--Colored in Quindaro, Kansas.


Clennie Bryan Price, World War I soldier

Clennie Bryan Price, World War I soldier
Creator: Price, Clennie Bryan
Date: 1918
Around 1919, the Kansas State Historical Society and the American Legion solicited biographical information from returning veterans (primarily members of the 35th and 89th infantry divisions) and the families of those who died in service, notably from the Gold Star Mothers. Each veteran or family member was asked to provide letters, photographs, a biography, and military records. This file contains information on Clennie Bryan Price, 36th Company, 164th Depot Brigade, 89th Division. Clennie died of pneumonia on October 31, 1918.


Cyrus K. Holliday to Samuel N. Wood

Cyrus K. Holliday to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: September 19, 1860
Dated Sept. 19, 1860, from Topeka, Kansas Territory, this brief letter from Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway founder, Cyrus K. Holliday, urges Samuel N. Wood to garner support and signatures to influence the course of a proposed "R.R. [railroad] from the Mo. River via Topeka toward your place. . . . Now is the time to act and act promptly."


Elias Clark to Samuel N. Wood

Elias Clark to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Clark, Elias
Date: May 4, 1860
Perhaps in response to a question by Wood about an advertisement for agents, Elias Clark of St. Louis, Missouri, writes that a prospective agent could buy a machine for $35 retail and test it out before trying to represent the product to others. He states his confidence in the "Raymond Double Threaded Family Sewing Machine," and reports it had been getting good reports from agents in Illinois. Clark's letter to Wood was written on the back of printed "rules for agents" and additional information about the sewing machine business.


F. M. Cummins to Samuel N. Wood

F. M. Cummins to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Cummins, F. M.
Date: November 13, 1859
Writing from El Mendaro in Madison County, Kansas Territory, F. M. Cummins speculates about Wood's November 8, 1859, election defeat. (Interestingly, when the territorial legislature convened in January, 1860, Wood, and not his Democratic opponent, T. S. Huffaker, represented the 23rd District.) In a faded letter, Cummins writes that "the ill timed article in your [Wood's] issue of Oct 31st [the Kansas Press, Council Grove] on Jim Lane pretty effectively "cooked" your prospects in Madison County. . . ." Cummins mentions Wood's candidacy for the state senate (election of December 6, the first under the Wyandotte Constitution) and writes: "Being a Lane man myself and knowing your opposition to him I cannot wish you success. . . ."


F. M. Cummins to Samuel N. Wood

F. M. Cummins to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Cummins, F. M.
Date: October 3, 1859
From El Mendaro in Madison County, Kansas Territory, F. M. Cummins wrote to S. N. Wood regarding the latter's candidacy for the territorial legislature in the election of November 8, 1859. He asked Wood to clarify his position on general issues concerning loyalty to Republican principles and a boundary issue that had negatively affected Madison County. The 23rd District included Madison, Chase, and Morris counties; Wood ultimately lost this election to T. S. Huffaker, the Democratic nominee, but defeated a third candidate, S. G. Britton, who was mentioned as the local favorite by Cummins. A month later, Wood won a seat in the state senate under the Wyandotte Constitution.


Geery & Butterfield to Samuel N. Wood

Geery & Butterfield to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Geery & Butterfield
Date: April 14, 1860
This letter from Geery and Butterfield of Junction City, Kansas Territory, addresses the issue of preemption and the method of protesting a claim. It is not entirely clear what is meant by the letter, but Margaret Wood, Samuel N. Wood's wife, was a party in this legal matter.


George W. Deitzler to Samuel N. Wood

George W. Deitzler to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Deitzler, George Washington, 1826-1884
Date: August 18, 1860
In the wake of Abraham Lincoln's nomination, May 16, 1860, as the Republican presidential nominee, Deitzler writes from Lawrence that Mark W. Delahay had gone to Springfield, Illinois, on behalf of "our Gen'l J. H. Lane," and the latter was going East soon, "to howl frightfully against Democracy & in favor of 'Old Abe' & so secure, if possible, the confidence of that good man." Deitzler is worried about the new administration, if it is to be controlled by the likes of Lane and Delahay. On another subject, in behalf of a friend, Deitzler asks about the new territorial divorce law and Wood's availability to handle such a case "in a quiet way."


Harvey J. Espy to Samuel N. Wood

Harvey J. Espy to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Espy, Harvey J., 1831-1868
Date: November 28, 1859
H. J. Espy, a probate judge in Council Grove, Kansas Territory, writes in response to a letter from Wood, who seemed to have challenged Espy's earlier "charge" that Wood was "connected with the Underground Rail Road." Espy explains that "as I understand the term, Underground Rail Road, I believe there is an inseparable connection between it and the republican party" and that he hadn't applied the connection to Wood personally.


J. B. Hodgin to Samuel N. Wood

J. B. Hodgin to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Hodgin, J. B.
Date: August 25, 1860
From Cottonwood Falls, Kansas Territory, J. B. Hodgin writes Samuel N. Wood about whiskey that was reportedly "supplied" to the Kaws at Cottonwood Falls on August 23, 1890. Hodgin states that "as is generally the result, a big fight occurred" among the Indians and several were killed. Hodgin calls for an investigation into the incident.


J. B. Woodward to Samuel N. Wood

J. B. Woodward to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Woodward, J. B.
Date: December 2, 1860
From Junction City, Kansas Territory, J. B. Woodward informs Samuel Wood that Woodward was "elated with the idea" that Wood might move his newspaper to Junction City, and promises to do all he could to support the paper if the relocation came about. According to Woodward, his town needs "a Press just as rabid and saucy as yours" that could effectively counter opposition. Reference is made to a "Geery," apparently H. T. Geery, who switched to the Democratic Party and started a Junction City newspaper.


J. F. Newton to Samuel N. Wood

J. F. Newton to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Newton, J. F.
Date: October 13, 1859
In this letter from Emporia, Kansas Territory, Newton compliments Wood on an article on Emporia that gave "hell" to the local Republicans and encourages Wood to do it again in the next issue of his newspaper. Factionalism was dividing the local party, and Newton mentions several locals, such as [Charles V.] Eskridge, by name.


Joel Grover's Militia Commission

Joel Grover's Militia Commission
Creator: Lane, James Henry, 1814-1866
Date: November 27, 1855
This printed document, headed with the name "James H. Lane," announces the election and certification of Joel Grover as colonel of the 6th Regiment, First Brigade of Kansas Volunteers. The volunteers were raised "to defend the City of Lawrence from threatened destruction by foreign invaders." It is dated November 27, 1855, and signed "J. H. Lane," general commanding.


John A. Halderman to Samuel N. Wood

John A. Halderman to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Halderman, John Adams
Date: November 20, 1859
In this brief but cordial letter written from Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, Halderman asks Wood to reprint an "enclosed" article from the "Herald of Freedom" in the "Kansas Press." Halderman writes that the piece "seems to have been written by a political opponent who is inclined to do me justice." He then mentions "the meeting of the squatters on the Kaw Reserve," and his sympathy for their plight.


Marcus J. Parrott to Samuel N. Wood

Marcus J. Parrott to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: March 28, 1860
Marcus J. Parrott, the Kansas Territory's delegate to Congress, writes Samuel N. Wood from Washington, D.C., about several issues, including the establishment of mail routes and railroad matters. Regarding the latter, Parrott briefly states his views about pending legislation and possible outcomes.


N. S. Storrs to Samuel N. Wood

N. S. Storrs to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Storrs, N. S.
Date: November 14, 1859
N. S. Storrs of Emporia, Kansas Territory, writes Samuel Wood concerning the ill will that had developed toward Wood in Butler County as a result of the recent (October 12, 1859) Republican nominating convention and the subsequent election of P.G.D. Morton to the territorial legislature. Storrs agrees with his friends from Butler County that it was a "packed" convention, and that Butler was not given sufficient representation. The county, Storrs writes, just wanted "her proper rights and not have a man forced upon her by Skullduggery and damd rascality." Storrs advises Wood to convince people in Butler County that "you did not pledged yourself to Morton."


Richard M. Young to A. Beach

Richard M. Young to A. Beach
Creator: Young, Richard M
Date: July 29, 1859
Written on stationery from Young & Niles, Law and Land Agency at Washington City, D. C., this letter to A. [Asahel?] Beach of "Beach Valley," Rice County, Kansas Territory, discussed the inquiry the law firm made "as to the proper mode of proceeding to recover damages for Indian Depredations . . . ." The attorney explained the statute of June 30, 1834, that covered this process and its provisions. Since Young referred Beach to the agents of the Kaws and the Kiowas (or "Indians of the upper Arkansas"), one might assume that his damage claim was connected to one of the raids by the latter tribe against the former.


Robert S. Stevens to Samuel N. Wood

Robert S. Stevens to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: August 6, 1860
Writing from Lecompton, Kansas Territory, Robert S. Stevens contacts Samuel L. Wood about an issue of grave concern to the people of Council Grove--"the Kaw Treaty," which had been taken up "the last day of the Extra or called Executive session & then ratified with certain amendments." Stevens explains the treaty's provisions and discusses the land survey to come.


Robert S. Stevens to Samuel N. Wood

Robert S. Stevens to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Stevens, Robert S.
Date: April 2, 1860
Robert S. Stevens, a Democratic attorney who had a variety of financial interests in Kansas during the 1850s and 1860s, writes this letter to Samuel N. Wood from Washington, D.C. Stevens seems to be lobbying for a number of concessions for himself and Kansas Territory. Specifically, Stevens writes of mail routes and "grants for R Rr" [railroads], which would not be forthcoming because of the Republicans who "care[d] nothing about us [Kansas] except so far as political capital can be made." Much of the letter is a condemnation of the Republican Party, which Stevens describes as holding up Kansas admission so the delay could be used against the Democrats. The final page addresses government action, or inaction, with regard to Indian treaties and land.


S. P. Hartz to Samuel N. Wood

S. P. Hartz to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Hartz, S. P.
Date: January 14, 1861
S. P. Hartz, a medical doctor, wrote to Samuel N. Wood from Allen, Breckinridge (now Lyon) County, Kansas Territory, regarding the Woods' "sick son," but devoted most of his two page letter to a legislative issue--the proposal to make Allen the county seat of a new county.


Salmon P. Chase to Samuel N. Wood

Salmon P. Chase to Samuel N. Wood
Creator: Chase, Salmon P. (Salmon Portland), 1808-1873
Date: October 18, 1859
From Columbus, Ohio, Governor Salmon P. Chase writes Samuel Newitt Wood, a former Ohioan, regarding Kansas politics and Chase's political prospects, speculating about the senatorial contest and the presidential contest of 1860. Chase is pleased that the Wyandotte Constitution passed by a good margin, and believes it would be political "suicide" for the Democratic majority in the Senate to oppose it. "To reject Kansas would be to throw away all." On the back is a "confidential" note from Chase's clerk, M. W. Delahay.


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