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Eldridge House rules and regulations

Eldridge House rules and regulations
Creator: Eldridge, T. B.
Date: May 10, 1856
The Eldridge House (or hotel) was built in Lawrence, Kansas Territory by the New England Emigrant Aid Society. It was an unofficial headquarters for the free state movement and, as such, it was targeted for destruction by Sheriff Jones' proslavery posse, which sacked Lawrence on May 21, 1856, less than two weeks after this document was created. This pocket-sized card contained twelve "rules and regulations" for residents, including the admonition to "lock and bolt the door when you retire," a prohibition against "all kinds of Gaming," and the notice that "persons without Baggage are expected to pay in advance."


Ford to Oscar E. Learnard

Ford to Oscar E. Learnard
Creator: Ford,
Date: November 14, 1860
This piece of correspondence was written by a man named Ford, from Missouri City, Arapaho Co., (later part of Colorado Territory). Ford had apparently left Burlington, Kansas Territory for "gold country" the previous year. He related some of his experiences in the gold fields and his desire to return to Kansas. Ford intended to stay "until I make enough to pay me for coming here and some more if I can," and he mentioned additional discoveries in the San Juan Mountains in Mexico, which caused "a great rush for those diggins."


George Washington Brown to Dear Sir & Brother

George Washington Brown to Dear Sir & Brother
Creator: Brown, George W. (George Washington), 1820-1915
Date: July 28, 1858
Writing on International Order of Oddfellows letterhead, George W. Brown of Lawrence informed his correspondent, apparently of White Cloud, Doniphan County, that he had enclosed an application for a subordinate lodge charter. The recipient of this letter might have been Sol Miller.


John B. Chapman to Oscar E. Learnard

John B. Chapman to Oscar E. Learnard
Creator: Chapman, John Butler
Date: September 28, 1858
John B. Chapman wrote from Mandovi, Kansas Territory, to Oscar Learnard regarding the location of "prospective Rail Roads" and his efforts toward "making Burlington a point" on the road to Emporia. He mentioned the importance of citizen's support for the construction of the line--"subscription of stock, donations, & credit"--to assure its location and some additional problems faced by the rapid advancement of railroads.


O. E. Learnard to friends

O. E. Learnard to friends
Creator: Learnard, Oscar E.
Date: June 6, 1856
From an embattled Lawrence, Learnard again wrote of near daily "occurrences of exciting interest," including skirmishes between the two "antagonistic parties" and actions of federal troops to "quell disturbances." The problem was with Missourians who had crossed over the border, not "actual settlers." Learnard claimed to be ready to do battle with them over the issue of "slavery or liberty in this country," and predicted that if things continued in this same direction, the entire country would soon be "embroiled in civil war."


Oddfellows Lodge of White Cloud, Kansas Territory

Oddfellows Lodge of White Cloud, Kansas Territory
Creator: Independent Order of Odd Fellows
Date: c. December 15, 1858
This document listed the names of those men who are becoming Charter members of the International Order of Odd Fellows' chapter in White Cloud, Kansas Territory. It also records which members have paid. According to the note on the bottom of the first page, the White Cloud Lodge was instituted on December 15, 1858.


Oscar E. Learnard to S.T. Learnard

Oscar E. Learnard to S.T. Learnard
Creator: Learnard, Oscar E.
Date: July 23, 1856
Oscar Learnard wrote his father, S.T. Learnard, that he was disappointed in the attitude of people in Vermont and throughout the North who continued to support the Pierce administration. If they did so because they were Democrats, they should learn from Andrew H. Reeder, J. H. Lane, William Y. Roberts, and others who had seen the light. Learnard admitted "a few cases" of free state retaliation "upon their oppressors," and then gave some "facts" about the "Patawotamie" incident, while not mentioning John Brown by name. Learnard believed that the reports about mangled bodies were untrue.


Oscar E. Learnard to S.T. Learnard, his father

Oscar E. Learnard to S.T. Learnard, his father
Creator: Learnard, Oscar E.
Date: August 10, 1856
Oscar Learnard wrote from Lawrence of his continued commitment to the "Sacked City," insisting that he would not be "bullied or frightened" by those committing outrages in Kansas Territory. He commented on the political composition of the territory and Lawrence, where he found many Douglas Democrats. Although there were some "fanatics" and "abolitionists," most residents of Lawrence were "western men" who had been driven to oppose the administration by the outrages. He insisted that the significance of the New England Emigrant Company had been exaggerated and that although more violent confrontations were likely, Kansas would eventually be free.


Oscar E. Learnard to friends

Oscar E. Learnard to friends
Creator: Learnard, Oscar E.
Date: May 23, 1856
Written just two days after the sack of Lawrence, this letter contained Learnard's observations of and reflections on "the fearful disaster to which this unfortunate town has been subjected." The town's citizens, wrote Learnard, chose not to resist the authority of the U.S. marshal but were nevertheless brutalized by Sheriff Jones and a posse of Missourians. He also mentioned Governor Reeder, Governor Shannon and David R. Atchison, who "made a speech."


Oscar E. Learnard to friends

Oscar E. Learnard to friends
Creator: Learnard, Oscar E.
Date: September 9, 1856
From Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Oscar Learnard wrote briefly to some Vermont friends of his recent "military" experience as "Lieutenant Colonel of the 4th regiment (cavalry) of Kansas Volunteers." At the time, Learnard said "the whole Territory presents a scene of wide spread desolation," but he also claimed Kansas was a beautiful place full of opportunity for agriculturalists and real estate investors. At present, however, one should only come if well armed and via "the new road" [Lane Trail].


Oscar E. Learnard to his parents and sister

Oscar E. Learnard to his parents and sister
Creator: Learnard, Oscar E.
Date: April 6, 1856
In this, his first extant letter from Kansas Territory, Oscar Learnard wrote his parents and sister in Vermont that Lawrence was now his "distant and strangely romantic retreat." This letter recorded Learnard's early impressions of "unfortunate abused Kansas." The situation was bad, but the reality of "Kansas affairs" was being distorted in the Eastern press. Learnard made reference to the bogus laws, the Free State movement, and the anticipated congressional investigation.


S. T. Learnard to Oscar E. Learnard, his son

S. T. Learnard to Oscar E. Learnard, his son
Creator: Learnard, S. T.
Date: January 14, 1858
Writing from Bakersfield, Vermont, to his son Oscar Learnard, S. T. Learnard claimed he was still planning to travel to Kansas Territory, and he asked about his son's affairs in Burlington. Learnard also focused on political attitudes in the East and mentioned Stephen Douglas' "speech on Kansas affairs" (Lecompton Constitution), which had caused "our Bogus democrats" to draw in "their horns." Many Democrats, he insisted, were still "ready to do any dirty work the slave power wish them to do."


S.T. Learnard to Oscar Learnard

S.T. Learnard to Oscar Learnard
Creator: Learnard, S. T.
Date: November 6, 1860
S.T. Learnard, a farmer and occasional state legislator from Bakersfield, Vermont, wrote his "Kansas" son frequently and complained that replies from Kansas were far too scarce. In this letter, S.T. Learnard commented on suffering in the territory, presumably from drought, and his hope that the national election would eliminate "her troubles from one source." He complimented the "brave men and women" of Kansas for their "suffering and endurance in the Cause of Liberty," and expressed confidence that Abraham Lincoln, who did well in Bakersfield, would win New York.


Showing 1 - 13

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