Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

Winter 1977, Volume 43, Number 4

-

Random Item

Melan Bridge, Topeka, Kansas Melan Bridge, Topeka, Kansas

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 602,315
Bookbag items: 36,262
Registered users: 11,017

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 24

Category Filters

People - Notable Kansans - Emery, James Stanley

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 24 of 24 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Abstracts of title from the James Stanley Emery Collection

Abstracts of title from the James Stanley Emery Collection
Date: 1869-1872
Abstracts of title from the James Stanley Emery collection. James was born in Franklin County, Maine in 1826. Educated at Waterville College, he was admitted to the bar in New York in 1854. He was involved with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, coming to Kansas with the second party of immigrants, and generally in free state activities in Kansas to ensure that it became an anti-slavery state when it entered the Union. Through the following years, he worked in numerous states for the cause. Emery was a member of the Leavenworth constitutional convention and served on the Kansas Legislature in 1862 and 1863. He was a lawyer and worked as a journalist for the New York Daily Times. President Abraham Lincoln appointed Emery U.S. District Attorney for Kansas in 1864. In 1891 he was president of the Kansas State Historical Society. Emery died in Lawrence in 1899.


Certificate appointing James S. Emery as a Justice of the Peace for the First District, Kansas Territory

Certificate appointing James S. Emery as a Justice of the Peace for the First District, Kansas Territory
Creator: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: November 8, 1854
Kansas Territorial Governor Andrew Reeder issued this certificate appointing James S. Emery as a justice of the peace for the Kansas Territory's First District. The boundaries of the First District are described in the document based on various geographic landmarks. The district includes the town of Lawrence and runs along the south side of the Kansas River to the Missouri state line. Its southern boundary is the Santa Fe road.


Claim Debt of Kansas Territory

Claim Debt of Kansas Territory
Creator: Kansas. Territory Auditor
Date: July 2, 1859
This document, issued by the Auditor's Office in Lecompton, Kansas Territory, promises to pay James S. Emery $1,045.25 for "Adjustments and Payments of Claims." The portion of the certificate used to indicate that the claim was paid is blank.


Constitution Convention opposition to the Lecompton Constitution, Kansas Territory

Constitution Convention opposition to the Lecompton Constitution, Kansas Territory
Creator: Winchell, James M
Date: March 30, 1858
An address, by James M. Winchell, chairman of the Constitution Convention's Committee on Remonstrance, against passage of the Lecompton Constitution. The address is formulated as an open letter ("Remonstrance of the Constitutional Convention against the passage of the Lecompton Constitution") to the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States, members of President Buchanan's cabinet, and state governors. The address cites five strong reasons (among them "It is not the act of the people of Kansas.") why Congress should reject the proslavery Lecompton Constitution despite "the aid of Federal bribery and corruption."


Court document conveying property to James S. Emery

Court document conveying property to James S. Emery
Date: July 16, 1861
This document settles a court case from the Second District Court of the Territory of Kansas, decided in November, 1860. James S. Emery was successful in getting a judgment against the Delaware Town Company of Lawrence, Kansas Territory, which resulted in his acquiring property in Leavenworth County. Repine was the sheriff of Leavenworth County when the land was conveyed to Emery.


Daybook

Daybook
Creator: Emery, James S., 1826-1899
Date: July 4, 1856 through June 19, 1857
The account book entries record Emery's loss of personal property as a result of July, 1856, violence between free state and proslavery advocates. Emery also recordes his expenses for making repairs to his damaged law office.


Day book of James Stanley Emery

Day book of James Stanley Emery
Creator: Emery, James S., 1826-1899
Date: 1856-1863
The day book of James Stanley Emery, containing personal accounts and memoranda. James Stanley Emery was born in Franklin County, Maine in 1826. Educated at Waterville College, he was admitted to the bar in New York in 1854. Involved with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, Emery came to Kansas with the second party of immigrants to ensure that it became an anti-slavery state when it entered the Union. He worked in numerous states for the cause through the following years. Emery was a member of the Leavenworth constitutional convention and served on the Kansas Legislature in 1862 and 1863. He was a lawyer and also worked as a journalist for the New York Daily Times. President Abraham Lincoln appointed Emery U.S. District Attorney for Kansas in 1864. In 1891 he was president of the Kansas State Historical Society. Emery died in Lawrence in 1899.


Deeds from the James Stanley Emery Collection

Deeds from the James Stanley Emery Collection
Date: 1856-1887
These deeds from the James Stanely Emery collection document a real estate purchase from James S. Emery for $500. Nathaniel S. Higgins of Fair Haven, Massachusetts is purchasing half of an undivided lot (Number 30) and the stone or concrete building currently occupied by Emery on Massachusetts Street in Lawrence. If Emery is able to acquire share number 97 of the town of Lawrence from the government, however, the sale will not take effect. James Stanley Emery was born in Franklin County, Maine in 1826. Educated at Waterville College, he was admitted to the bar in New York in 1854. He was involved with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, coming to Kansas with the second party of immigrants, and generally in free state activities in Kansas to ensure that it became an anti-slavery state when it entered the Union. Through the following years, he worked in numerous states for the cause. Emery was a member of the Leavenworth constitutional convention and served on the Kansas Legislature in 1862 and 1863. He was a lawyer and worked as a journalist for the New York Daily Times. President Abraham Lincoln appointed Emery U.S. District Attorney for Kansas in 1864. In 1891 he was president of the Kansas State Historical Society. Emery died in Lawrence in 1899.


Deed to Nathaniel S. Higgins

Deed to Nathaniel S. Higgins
Creator: Emery, James S., 1826-1899
Date: November 5, 1856
This hand written deed documents Nathaniel S. Higgins of Fair Haven, Massachusetts, purchase of half of an undivided lot (Number 30) and the stone or concrete building currently occupied by Emery on Massachusetts Street in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, from James S. Emery for $500. If Emery was able to acquire title to share number 97 of the town of Lawrence from the government, the sale of the half lot and the building would not take effect.


Document affirming that James S. Emery was sworn in as Justice of the Peace

Document affirming that James S. Emery was sworn in as Justice of the Peace
Creator: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: November 9, 1854
This is a follow up document to James Emery's appointment as Justice of the Peace for the First District, Kansas Territory. It is signed by Andrew Reeder, Territorial Governor.


Free State Hotel ball invitation

Free State Hotel ball invitation
Date: 1859
An invitation to a ball held on January 29, 1859, at the Free State Hotel in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, with proceeds going toward refurnishing the hotel "and in some degree retrieving the loss sustained by Col. Eldridge in the destruction of the Eldridge House on the 21st day of May, 1856." Music would be performed by the Lawrence Cornet Band.


J. S. Emery's letter of introduction

J. S. Emery's letter of introduction
Creator: Raymond, Wesley, and Company
Date: May 22, 1856
A letter of introduction for J. S. Emery, a correspondent for the New York "Daily Times" assigned to cover events in Kansas Territory. The letter states that any assistance provided in helping Emery forward information from Kansas Territory would be viewed as a special favor.


James S. Emery

James S. Emery
Creator: Bowman, photographer,
James Stanley Emery had a law practice in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. He was associated with the New England Emigrant Aid Company and worked as a journalist for the "New York Daily Times." He was involved in numerous free state activities both in Kansas Territory and in the East.


James Stanley Emery correspondence

James Stanley Emery correspondence
Date: 1855-1899
These letters are the incoming correspondence from the James Stanley Emery collection. James was born in Franklin County, Maine in 1826. Educated at Waterville College, he was admitted to the bar in New York in 1854. He was involved with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, coming to Kansas with the second party of immigrants, to ensure that Kansas became an anti-slavery state when it entered the Union. Through the following years, he worked in numerous states for the cause. Emery was a member of the Leavenworth constitutional convention and served on the Kansas Legislature in 1862 and 1863. He was a lawyer and worked as a journalist for the New York Daily Times. President Abraham Lincoln appointed Emery U.S. District Attorney for Kansas in 1864. In 1891 he was president of the Kansas State Historical Society, and from 1892-1893 he was president of the Kansas Historical Foundation. Emery died in Lawrence in 1899.


James Stanley Emery speeches

James Stanley Emery speeches
Creator: Emery, James S., 1826-1899
Date: 1876-1897
Several addresses written and given by James Stanley Emery. He spoke to a number of audiences at Kansas universities and clubs on religion, history, and other similar topics. James Stanley Emery was born in Franklin County, Maine in 1826. Educated at Waterville College, he was admitted to the bar in New York in 1854. Involved with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, Emery came to Kansas with the second party of immigrants to ensure that it became an anti-slavery state when it entered the Union. He worked in numerous states for the cause through the following years. Emery was a member of the Leavenworth constitutional convention and served on the Kansas Legislature in 1862 and 1863. He was a lawyer and also worked as a journalist for the New York Daily Times. President Abraham Lincoln appointed Emery U.S. District Attorney for Kansas in 1864. In 1891 he was president of the Kansas State Historical Society. Emery died in Lawrence in 1899.


Memorandum, proceedings in grand jurors' room

Memorandum, proceedings in grand jurors' room
Creator: Emery, James S., 1826-1899
Date: September 14, 1858
A memorandum showing the proceedings in the grand juror's room, September 14, 1858, from the James Stanley Emery collection. James Stanley Emery was born in Franklin County, Maine in 1826. Educated at Waterville College, he was admitted to the bar in New York in 1854. Involved with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, Emery came to Kansas with the second party of immigrants to ensure that it became an anti-slavery state when it entered the Union. He worked in numerous states for the cause through the following years. Emery was a member of the Leavenworth constitutional convention and served on the Kansas Legislature in 1862 and 1863. He was a lawyer and also worked as a journalist for the New York Daily Times. President Abraham Lincoln appointed Emery U.S. District Attorney for Kansas in 1864. In 1891 he was president of the Kansas State Historical Society. Emery died in Lawrence in 1899.


Mortgages from the James Stanley Emery Collection

Mortgages from the James Stanley Emery Collection
Creator: Emery, James S., 1826-1899
Date: 1859-1899
Mortgages from the Janes Stanley Emery collection. James Stanley Emery was born in Franklin County, Maine in 1826. Educated at Waterville College, he was admitted to the bar in New York in 1854. He was involved with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, coming to Kansas with the second party of immigrants, and generally in free state activities in Kansas to ensure that it became an anti-slavery state when it entered the Union. Through the following years, he worked in numerous states for the cause. Emery was a member of the Leavenworth constitutional convention and served on the Kansas Legislature in 1862 and 1863. He was a lawyer and worked as a journalist for the New York Daily Times. President Abraham Lincoln appointed Emery U.S. District Attorney for Kansas in 1864. In 1891 he was president of the Kansas State Historical Society. Emery died in Lawrence in 1899.


Statement of fees allowed in confiscation cases and statements of emolument returns

Statement of fees allowed in confiscation cases and statements of emolument returns
Date: 1861-1866
The first document details the settlement of a court case from the Second District Court of the Territory of Kansas decided in November 1860. Emery was successful in getting a judgment against the Delaware Town Company of Lawrence, which resulted in his acquiring property in Leavenworth County. Repine was the sheriff of Leavenworth County when the land was conveyed to Emery. James Stanley Emery was born in Franklin County, Maine in 1826. Educated at Waterville College, he was admitted to the bar in New York in 1854. He was involved with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, coming to Kansas with the second party of immigrants, and generally in free state activities in Kansas to ensure that it became an anti-slavery state when it entered the Union. Through the following years, he worked in numerous states for the cause. Emery was a member of the Leavenworth constitutional convention and served on the Kansas Legislature in 1862 and 1863. He was a lawyer and worked as a journalist for the New York Daily Times. President Abraham Lincoln appointed Emery U.S. District Attorney for Kansas in 1864. In 1891 he was president of the Kansas State Historical Society. Emery died in Lawrence in 1899.


Tax receipts from the James Stanley Emery Collection

Tax receipts from the James Stanley Emery Collection
Date: 1861-1875
Tax receipts from the James Stanley Emery collection. James was born in Franklin County, Maine in 1826. Educated at Waterville College, he was admitted to the bar in New York in 1854. He was involved with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, coming to Kansas with the second party of immigrants, and generally in free state activities in Kansas to ensure that it became an anti-slavery state when it entered the Union. Through the following years, he worked in numerous states for the cause. Emery was a member of the Leavenworth constitutional convention and served on the Kansas Legislature in 1862 and 1863. He was a lawyer and worked as a journalist for the New York Daily Times. President Abraham Lincoln appointed Emery U.S. District Attorney for Kansas in 1864. In 1891 he was president of the Kansas State Historical Society. Emery died in Lawrence in 1899.


Thomas H. Webb to J. S. Emery

Thomas H. Webb to J. S. Emery
Creator: Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: November 20, 1856
The letter indicatesthat J. S. Emery was duly authorized by the New England Emigrant Aid Company as an agent to organize state, county, and town associations in New Hampshire to provide aid to Kansas Territory. Webb suggests they follow the model established in Massachusetts. He also makes it clear that the state association would be responsible for paying Mr. Emery for his efforts in organizing New Hampshire.


Thomas Webb to J. S. Emery

Thomas Webb to J. S. Emery
Creator: Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: April 4, 1856
Thomas Webb of Boston, Massachusetts, writes J. S. Emery in Brandon, Vermont, to tell him of various places in Maine and New Hampshire that would like someone from Kansas to speak to them. Webb informs Emery that the group in New Hampshire is interested in securing recruits to go to Kansas, but that Emery's principal purpose is to raise money for the Relief Fund. He writes Emery that the sponsoring group should cover his expenses, that they should take contributions at any public meeting and that they should establish a committee for soliciting funds locally. Webb also describes an incident where Missourians seized a box they thought contained weapons, but it housed a rosewood piano. Webb also mentions that Charles Robinson was in Washington, D. C.


Topeka Constitutional Convention

Topeka Constitutional Convention
Date: October 30, 1855
During this session of the constitutional convention, delegates dealt briefly with the question of "an immediate organization of a State Government," a highly controversial issue, and considered a report on the militia. Lively debate on the latter issue seems to have followed, although not much detail is given here, with Charles Robinson offering an amendment "striking out the word white--" This presumably would have had the effect of making African Americans and Indians eligible for service, but the amendment failed seven to twenty-four. Not surprisingly Lane, Holliday, Delahay, and Parrott were among those voting in the negative. The convention also addressed the franchise and "Negro exclusion," but little detail is provided here. (For more, see newspaper coverage, New York Daily Times, in Webb Scrapbook, v. 6, pp. 237.)


Topeka Constitutional Convention journal

Topeka Constitutional Convention journal
Date: October 31, 1855
During the afternoon session of Wednesday, October 31, 1855, Jim Lane presented a "Resolution which was ordered to be entered upon the Journal of the convention--said Resolution being the instructions given by the people of the 2nd Representative District" at a Lawrence meeting of October 7. The "instructions" and Lane's resolution provided that "the question of excluding Free Negroes from the Territory" be submitted to a vote of the people on the day they voted on the constitution itself.


United States versus Edward Chapman for surety to keep the peace

United States versus Edward Chapman for surety to keep the peace
Date: December 28, 1854 - December 29, 1854
These legal documents relate to the case of the United States vs. Edward Chapman for surety to keep the peace. In an affidavit sworn before Justice of the Peace James Stanley Emery, Albert Pearl accuses Chapman of threatening to kill him on December 26, 1854 in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. On December 29, 1854 Chapman is apprehended and released on a bond recognizance, agreeing to keep the peace in the Territory of Kansas until the next term of the First District Court or pay a fine of one thousand dollars.


Showing 1 - 24

Copyright © 2007-2019 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.