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People - Notable Kansans - Montgomery, James, 1814-1871

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Articles of Agreement for Shubel Morgan's Company

Articles of Agreement for Shubel Morgan's Company
Creator: Morgan, Shubel
Date: July 12, 1858
In July 1858, fifteen men including Shubel Morgan, alias John Brown, J. H. Kagi, James Montgomery, and Augustus Wattles signed this document and thus "agree[d] to be governed by the following rules" of conduct. The rules included "gentlemanly and respectful deportment," obedience to the commander's orders, "no intoxicating drinks," etc.


Augustus Wattles to Thaddeus Hyatt

Augustus Wattles to Thaddeus Hyatt
Creator: Wattles, Augustus, 1807-1876
Date: December 3, 1860
This letter, written from New York by Augustus Wattles, was addressed to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The main focus of the letter was on two proslavery men--Captain Doake and General Clark--who persisted in mistreating free state settlers along the Missouri-Kansas border. The letter also referred to Charles Jennison and to James Montgomery, whose band of free state militiamen was still active even into 1860. Wattles vehemently maintained that free state forces were only organizing for their own protection, not for a great insurrection as the Missourians believed.


Augustus Wattles to William Hutchinson

Augustus Wattles to William Hutchinson
Creator: Wattles, Augustus, 1807-1876
Date: April 28, 1858
Wattles, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory, describes the violence in the southern portion of Kansas Territory shortly before the Marais des Cygnes massacre.


Charles E. Griffith to James Montgomery

Charles E. Griffith to James Montgomery
Creator: Griffith, Charles E.
Date: November 15, 1859
Charles Griffith, an Osawatomie newspaper publisher writing from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, writes Captain James Montgomery that he believes voting fraud has occurred in the November 8, 1859, territorial legislature election. Griffith claims that, in the absence of the fraud, Montgomery would have won a seat in the territorial house of representatives.


Colonel James Montgomery appointment

Colonel James Montgomery appointment
Date: June 24, 1861
This document officially appoints and commissions James Montgomery as a Colonel of the Third Regiment of Volunteers, State of Kansas--part of General Lane's Brigade. Montgomery was an obvious choice for such a post due to his experience as a Jayhawker during the Bleeding Kansas period that followed the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, as well as his ardent support of the Union at the eve of the Civil War.


Commission, James Montgomery, captain

Commission, James Montgomery, captain
Date: September 16, 1857
This printed commission, issued from the "Head-Quarters Kansas Volunteers, For the Protection of the Ballot-Box," was given to James Montgomery and signed by J. H. Lane and M. F. Conway, adjutant general, on September 16, 1857. Montgomery was commissioned captain of the "Little Sugar Creek Company." [This would have been specifically for the territorial election held October 5, 1857.]


George L. Stearns and James Montgomery correspondence

George L. Stearns and James Montgomery correspondence
Creator: Montgomery, James, 1814-1871
Date: May 08, 1861
A letter from George L. Stearns to James Montgomery and Montgomery's responding letter. Stearns writes about the threat of battle coming to Kansas and Montgomery responds that the Confederacy is trying to win over Indians to fight for them.


George Luther Stearns correspondence

George Luther Stearns correspondence
Date: 1861-1862
This correspondence is between George Luther Stearns and several prominent abolitionists, including Colonel James Montgomery, George W. Collamore, Mary A. Brown, and John Brown, Jr. Included is a circular from the Office of the Kansas Relief Committee, of which Stearns was chairman, seeking clothing and other goods. Stearns received letters from individuals, wholesalers, retailers, and charitable organizations relating to the donation of various articles, goods, and money. It is also discussed how these donations, especially clothing, would benefit the 2nd and 3rd Regiments. A letter from Eleanor S. Deane includes a poem entitled, "To the Little Boys and Girls of Kansas."


George W. Clarke to Samuel J. Jones

George W. Clarke to Samuel J. Jones
Creator: Clarke, George W.
Date: June 2, 1858
Writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory, to Douglas County Sheriff Samuel J. Jones, George W. Clarke describes a May 30, 1858, incident in which Deputy U.S. Marshal Samuel D. Walker attempted to arrest him as a suspect in the Marais des Cygnes Massacre. Clarke declares that he was innocent of the charges, and views Walker's arrest warrant as a "bogus writ." Clarke initially resisted arrest but claimed that he agreed to surrender to Lieutenant Shinn of the U.S. Army to prevent violence between Fort Scott residents and Walker's men. Clarke also describes the unsuccessful efforts of angry Fort Scott residents to convince Walker to arrest James Montgomery.


J. Williams to James W. Denver

J. Williams to James W. Denver
Creator: Williams, J.
Date: May 16, 1858
Williams, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory, to Governor James W. Denver, complains about the activities of James Montgomery and "his murderers & robbers" in Bourbon County. Williams, who displayed moderate views, condemns both proslavery and free state violence and maintains that the citizens of Bourbon County simply wanted to live in peace.


James Montgomery

James Montgomery
Date: Between 1858 and 1860
Portrait of James Montgomery, who came to Linn County, Kansas Territory, early in the territorial period and became active in the free state cause. When the Civil War started, Montgomery joined the regular service, being elected colonel of the Third Kansas Volunteer Infantry, a part of "Lane's Brigade." When the Third, which gained quite a reputation along with the rest of the brigade for its jayhawking, was consolidated with some other units to form the Tenth Kansas Volunteer Infantry in April 1862, Montgomery remained the regiment's colonel. In early 1863, however, he transferred to the Second Regiment, South Carolina Colored Volunteers, and helped fill its ranks with black recruits. In 1864 he resigned his commission, returned to Kansas, and ended his military career as colonel of the Sixth Kansas State Militia. After the war, Montgomery returned to his Linn County farm, where he died, December 6, 1871.


James Montgomery

James Montgomery
Creator: Leonard & Martin
Date: Between 1861 and 1865
This is a carte-de-visite of James Montgomery, colonel of the 3rd and 10th Kansas Volunteer Infantry Regiments.


James Montgomery

James Montgomery
Date: August 12, 1860
Cased ninth plate ambrotype portrait of James Montgomery, 1814-1871. Montgomery came to Linn County, Kansas Territory, early in the territorial period after living in Ohio, Kentucky and Missouri. He was active in the free state cause and was involved in most of the conflicts between pro-slavery and free state forces in that area. He raised a militia troop that was active in 1857.


James Montgomery

James Montgomery
Date: Between 1858 and 1860
Photograph portrait of James Montgomery, 1814-1871, came to Linn County, Kansas Territory, early in the territorial period after living in Ohio, Kentucky and Missouri. He was active in the free state cause and was involved in most of the conflicts between pro-slavery and free state forces in that area. He raised a militia troop that was active in 1857.


James Montgomery correspondence

James Montgomery correspondence
Creator: Montgomery, James, 1814-1871
Date: 1861-1862
James Montgomery was a well known Kansas "jayhawker." Born in Ohio in 1814, Montgomery moved to Kentucky, taught school, and became a minister in the "Campbellite" church. Then he went to Missouri where he lived with his second wife until soon after the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854. Montgomery purchased a claim in Linn County, near Mound City, and quickly became a recognized leader of the free-state movement. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


James Montgomery to Franklin B. Sanborn

James Montgomery to Franklin B. Sanborn
Creator: Montgomery, James, 1814-1871
Date: January 14, 1861
Just two weeks before Kansas would be admitted to the Union, and in the midst of the early secession crisis, Montgomery (Mound City, Kansas Territory) writes Franklin B. Sanborn (Boston, Massachusetts) that although Montgomery did not favor an invasion of "the slave states so long as they keep themselves at home," Missouri was crossing the line and interfering in Kansas affairs. He also comments on recent mob violence in Boston and General Harney's futile efforts to enforce the Fugitive Slave law in southern Kansas.


James Montgomery to George L. Stearns

James Montgomery to George L. Stearns
Creator: Montgomery, James, 1814-1871
Date: November 27, 1860
From Mound City, Kansas Territory, James Montgomery writes George Stearns about recent trouble at Fort Scott and about acting governor George M. Beebe's visit to Mound City. He came, according to Montgomery, to ascertain for himself if the rumors about Montgomery's activities were correct. He left satisfied that the free staters were acting properly and "promising to do what he could to reform abuses" in the federal courts and protect their rights. Although things were quiet at present, and more fugitive slaves had arrived who could now stay safely in Kansas, Montgomery warns that the introduction of federal troops into southern Kansas would create an explosive situation.


James Montgomery to George L. Stearns

James Montgomery to George L. Stearns
Creator: Montgomery, James, 1814-1871
Date: December 12, 1860
Montgomery writes from Mound City, Kansas Territory, to update Stearns on the activities of "old Harney" (General William S. Harney) and the futile federal government efforts at "enforcing the Fugitive Slave law on us here; it can't be done." Montgomery insists that despite the government's effort to portray "'Montgomery and his band'" as not of the people, popular support for his activities had just been unanimously endorsed at a mass meeting in Mound City.


James Montgomery to George L. Stearns

James Montgomery to George L. Stearns
Creator: Montgomery, James, 1814-1871
Date: October 6, 1860
Having returned from a trip to the East (where he visited George Stearns, Horace Greeley, and others in Boston, New York, and Philadelphia), Montgomery writes from Mound City, Linn County, Kansas Territory, that he "found the people greatly excited." News of violence directed against free state men in Texas and Arkansas has awakened Kansans' sense of urgency, as Montgomery continues his efforts to free slaves and undercut the slave economy of western Missouri.


James Montgomery to George L. Stearns

James Montgomery to George L. Stearns
Creator: Montgomery, James, 1814-1871
Date: December 14, 1860
In response to a letter dated November 29, Montgomery informs Stearns that "Uncle Sam has stolen all my late corrispondence [sic]. I suppose he thinks he will find some Treason in it:--He is welcome to all he can find." Much of the news about his activities and intention, insists Montgomery, is simply newspaper talk. "'Montgomery's Band' is a myth. Montgomery's men are the people, and Montgomery himself is one [of] them." He is very interested in getting the press back East to inform the public of "the real state of affairs here."


James Montgomery to Leander Martin

James Montgomery to Leander Martin
Creator: Montgomery, James, 1814-1871
Date: December 18, 1859
James Montgomery, writing from Mound City, Kansas Territory, responds to Leander Martin's suggestion that he (Montgomery) contest the results of the November 8, 1859 election for representatives to the territorial legislature. Montgomery lost a race for a seat in the territorial house of representatives to William R. Wagstaff. Montgomery indicates that he had no plans to contest the election himself but would not object if others contest it on his behalf. Martin's letter is included at the top of the document.


John Brown (?)  to James Montgomery

John Brown (?) to James Montgomery
Creator: Brown, John, 1800-1859
Date: January 2, 1859
This brief letter from a "Friend"--most likely John Brown--to James Montgomery, the Linn County jawhawker, was addressed from "Turkey Creek," January 2, 1859: "Osawattomie men made a drive into Missouri the other night, since which some of the settlers & other friends have made a stand on the line to prevent an invasion. You are requested to hold yourself in readiness to call out reinforcements at a moments notice."


John McCannon to James Montgomery

John McCannon to James Montgomery
Creator: McCannon, John
Date: May, 1860
John McCannon, writing from Denver City, Araphahoe County, Kansas Territory, a location that is currently in Colorado, describes the killing of a man named Akins, who McCannon claimed had been killed by pro-slavery supporters. McCannon also comments favorably upon the Republican Party's nomination of Abraham Lincoln as its presidential candidate.


John McCannon to James Montgomery

John McCannon to James Montgomery
Creator: McCannon, John
Date: December 24, 1859
John McCannon, writing from Clear Creek, Kansas Territory, a location that is currently in Colorado, describes politics and the economy in the gold mining region of western Kansas Territory. McCannon comments on the formation of the Territory of Jefferson, an extralegal government formed in 1859 by residents of Arapahoe County, Kansas Territory. McCannon also mentions mining activities in the area.


Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence

Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1861-1862
Collection of correspondence including letters written to Governor Charles Robinson and letters written by Charles Chadwick, Adjutant General of Kansas. Also included are appointments issued by James H. Lane, Commissioner of Recruiting, to Ernestus Gilpatrick, John Owens, Edward P. Kellam, C.K. Gilchrist, J.B. Allen, Felix Brenigan, Isaac Seaman, Robert Little, A.G. Cunningham, Andrew J. Frances, Robert Riddle, Joseph R. Kent, Jeremiah C. Johnson, William Cowan, and Allen Griffen. Topics discussed include the consolidation and reorganization of Kansas regiments and companies and mustering out of individuals. Several letters sent to General J.C. Stone in Leavenworth from citizens endorsing S.E. Ward, a trader at Fort Laramie, report Indian hostility along the road to California. A searchable, full-text version of this correspondence is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


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