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undated 1977 (Box 49, Folder 4)

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Homes and businesses in the area near the future site of the Topeka Boulevard bridge in Topeka, Kansas Homes and businesses in the area near the future site of the Topeka Boulevard bridge in Topeka, Kansas

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Collections - State Archives - Governor's Records - Paulen, Benjamin Sanford

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Governor Ben Paulen campaign correspondence

Governor Ben Paulen campaign correspondence
Creator: Peck, Dr. F. Jesse
Date: Between 1925 and 1929
Correspondence to Kansas Governor Ben Paulen regarding campaign matters.


Governor Ben S. Paulen, Western University correspondence

Governor Ben S. Paulen, Western University correspondence
Date: September 15, 1926-September 23, 1926
Correspondence between Kansas Governor Ben S. Paulen, regarding Western University in Quindaro, Kansas.


John L. Frye to Governor Ben Paulen

John L. Frye to Governor Ben Paulen
Creator: Frye, John
Date: January 20, 1927
John Frye writes to Governor Paulen with his concerns about repeal of the Kansas anti-cigarette law.


National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to Governor Ben Paulen

National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to Governor Ben Paulen
Creator: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People
Date: March 13, 1925
The Kansas branch of the NAACP in Kansas City wrote this letter to Kansas Governor Ben S. Paulen in Topeka. The NAACP thanked Governor Paulen for not passing Senate Bill 269 known as the Ku Klux Klan bill. If passed, this bill would have allowed organizations such as the Ku Klux Klan to operate in Kansas without taking out a charter. Governor Paulen disagreed with the bill and discouraged its passing. The bill failed in the Kansas House of Representatives with 65 nays and 57 yeas.


Senator S. F. Paul to Governor Ben S. Paulen

Senator S. F. Paul to Governor Ben S. Paulen
Creator: Paul, S. F.
Date: December 16, 1924
A letter from Senator S. F. Paul to Kansas Governor Ben Paulen, regarding inspection charges and weighing charges of the State Grain Department.


W. R. Branham to the Kansas State Prison Commission

W. R. Branham to the Kansas State Prison Commission
Creator: Branham, W. R.
Date: March 20, 1925
Oxford, Georgia resident, W. R. Branham, writes the Kansas State Prison Commission of Topeka (Shawnee County) for information on the effect the abolition of capital punishment has had on murder rates in Kansas. Kansas abolished its first capital punishment law in 1907 and did not reinstate legal executions until the 1935. Prior to 1907, the state hanged nine persons under state law between 1863 and 1870. No state executions occurred between 1870 and 1932, although historians suggest that as many as ninety illegal executions (lynching) occurred in the state during that period. See William Eaton Hutchison to W. R. Branham, March 23, 1925.


William Easton Hutchison to W. R. Branham

William Easton Hutchison to W. R. Branham
Creator: Hutchison, William Easton, b. 1860
Date: March 23, 1925
Pardon Attorney Wm. Easton Hutchison of Topeka (Shawnee County) replies to Oxford, Georgia, resident W. R. Branham concerning the effect the state's abolition of capital punishment has had on murder rates in Kansas. Hutchison responds that he has no data on the subject and cannot tell whether there has been an increase or decrease in murder rates since the abolition in 1907. Hutchison considers the change in the law a change in name only since previous governors refused to carry out the execution order, he explains, making the original law ineffectual. Kansas abolished capital punishment in 1907 and did not reinstate legal executions until 1935. Prior to 1907, the state hanged nine persons under state law between 1863 and 1870. No state executions occurred between 1870 and 1932, although historians suggest that as many as ninety illegal executions (lynchings) occurred in the state during that period. See W. R. Branham to Kansas State Prison Commission, March 20, 1925.


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