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Homes and businesses in the area near the future site of the Topeka Boulevard bridge in Topeka, Kansas Homes and businesses in the area near the future site of the Topeka Boulevard bridge in Topeka, Kansas

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A Corner of Bryce Canyon

A Corner of Bryce Canyon
Creator: Coy Avon Seward
Date: between 1935 and 1945
Small vertically oriented intaglio print on white paper. Penciled artist's signature below print. The artist was a founding member of the influential Prairie Print Makers, a group dedicated to promoting print making and offering affordable art to collectors. Seward was a tireless promoter of the arts in Kansas. He painted more than 30 canvases of landscapes, but his main interest was print making.


A Glimpse of the Smoky Hills

A Glimpse of the Smoky Hills
Creator: Coy Avon Seward
Date: 1927
Black lithographed scene on tan kid finish Bristol paper. Depicts the Smoky Hills of Kansas through an arch formed by trees. The artist was Coy Avon Seward (1884-1939), born in Chase, Kansas, and trained at both Washburn and Bethany colleges. Seward was a founding member of the Prairie Print Makers Association. This group believed art should be affordable for all people, not just collectors. Seward produced this print in 1927.


A Kansas Wheatfield

A Kansas Wheatfield
Creator: Herschel C. Logan
Date: 1923
This artwork is a black ink on rice paper woodcut showing a field of haycocks at dusk or dawn. A Kansas Wheatfield was drawn by Herschel C. Logan, who was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri. Shortly after his birth, the family moved to Winfield, Kansas. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts for one year. Logan was a commercial and advertising artist in Salina, Kansas, until his retirement in 1968. He was a member of the Prairie Print Makers. After retirement, Logan moved to Santa Ana, California.


Abilene, Kansas

Abilene, Kansas
Creator: Baker-Co
Date: 1874
An illustration, titled "Abilene in its Glory," of crowds of people at the railroad depot in Abilene, Kansas. Also visible are a train drawn by a steam locomotive, people on foot and on horseback, a telegraph wire, a horse-drawn carriage, and buildings. The illustration was copied from Joseph G. McCoy's Historic Sketches of the Cattle Trade of the West and Southwest, 1874. The illustrator is Henry Worrall.


Abilene in its glory

Abilene in its glory
Creator: Baker-Co
Date: 1874
An illustration of a train of cattle leaving Abilene, Kansas. The illustration was copied from Joseph G. McCoy's Historic Sketches of the Cattle Trade of the West and Southwest, 1874. The illustrator is Henry Worrall


Admiral Byrd

Admiral Byrd
Creator: Herschel C. Logan
Date: 1936
A black ink on rag paper woodcut, portrait of Rear Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd, Jr. in dress uniform by Herschel Logan. A member of the Prairie Printmakers, Logan executed this work in 1936. He was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri, and the family moved shortly afterwards to Winfield, Kansas. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. He worked as an advertising artist in Salina until his retirement in 1968. Logan moved to Santa Ana, California, where he died on December 8, 1987.


All bound for the Kansas valleys!

All bound for the Kansas valleys!
Date: Between 1870 and 1880
This brochure advertises the sale of five million acres of land by the Kansas Pacific Railroad, along the Kaw, Big Blue, Republican, Smoky Hill, Solomon, Saline, and Victoria Rivers in Kansas. The illustration on the last page may have been drawn by Topeka artist Henry Worrall.


Autumn

Autumn
Creator: Herschel C. Logan
Date: 1924
A sepia, orange and beige ink on paper woodcut of a one and a half story house by Herschel Logan. One of the Prairie Printmakers, Logan executed this work in 1924, claiming this was his only three-color block print. Logan was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri, and the family moved to Winfield, Kansas shortly afterwards. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. He worked as an advertising artist in Salina until he retired in 1968. He moved to Santa Ana, California in his retirement, where he died on December 8, 1987.


Back Porch

Back Porch
Creator: Herschel C. Logan
Date: 1928
A black ink on rice paper woodcut of a porch with a wooden crate sitting on it, by Herschel Logan. One of the Prairie Printmakers, Logan executed this work in 1928 from a photo in his files. He was born april 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri, and the family moved to Winfield, Kansas shortly afterwards. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. Logan worked as an advertising artist in Salina until his retirement in 1968. He moved to Santa Ana, California, in his retirement, where he died on December 8, 1987.


C. K. Holliday to Franklin Crane

C. K. Holliday to Franklin Crane
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: December 28, 1856
Writing from Meadville, Pennsylvania, Cyrus Holliday wrote to Franklin Crane concerning the need to make a lithograph of Topeka that could help attract emigrants during the upcoming season. He stated that Crane was an important asset for the Topeka Association. The rest of the letter dealt with other association business.


Camp wagon on the trail

Camp wagon on the trail
Creator: Baker-Co
Date: 1874
This photograph shows an illustration of a camp wagon on the trail. The illustration was copied from Joseph G. McCoy's Historic Sketches of the Cattle Trade of the West and Southwest, 1874. The illustrator is Henry Worrall.


Cattle drive of Longhorns

Cattle drive of Longhorns
Creator: Baker-Co
Date: 1874
"Midnight Storm and Stampede" copied from Joseph G. McCoy's Historic Sketches of the Cattle Trade of the West and Southwest, 1874. The illustrator is Henry Worrall.


Col. O.W. Wheeler's cattle herd

Col. O.W. Wheeler's cattle herd
Creator: Baker-Co
Date: 1874
View of Col. O. W. Wheeler's herd en route to the Kansas Pacific Railway in 1867. The illustration was copied from "Historic Sketches of the Cattle Trade" by Joseph McCoy published in 1874. The illustrator is Henry Worrall.


Corn Pulling

Corn Pulling
Creator: Clare Leighton
Date: 1952
Black and white woodcut print by Clare Leighton, depicting two workers harvesting corn by hand. Prairie Printmakers gift print for 1952. This print's owner, Virginia McArthur, was most likely an associate member of the Prairie Printmakers. Paying a five-dollar annual membership entitled members to receive the Prairie Printmaker's yearly "gift print," produced during the period from 1931 through 1965.


Country Depot

Country Depot
Creator: Herschel C. Logan
Date: Unknown date
A black ink on paper woodcut showing activity at the Akron, Kansas, Santa Fe depot. Country Depot was drawn by Herschel C. Logan, who was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri , and shortly after his birth the family moved to Winfield, Kansas. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts for one year. Logan was a commercial and advertising artist in Salina, Kansas, until his retirement in 1968. He was a member of the Prairie Print Makers. After retirement, Logan moved to Santa Ana, California.


Dance-House

Dance-House
Creator: Baker-Co
Date: 1874
An illustration of an exuberant dance at a dance house copied from Joseph G. McCoy's Historic Sketches of the Cattle Trade of the West and Southwest, 1874. The illustrator is Henry Worrall.


District School

District School
Creator: Herschel C. Logan
Date: 1934
A black ink on rag paper woodcut showing a country school that according to the artist, was "on old U.S. 40 Highway near Manhattan, Kansas." District School was drawn by Herschel C. Logan, who was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri , and shortly after his birth the family moved to Winfield, Kansas. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts for one year. Logan was a commercial and advertising artist in Salina, Kansas, until his retirement in 1968. He was a member of the Prairie Print Makers. After retirement, Logan moved to Santa Ana, California.


Drouthy Kansas, How Crops In Kansas Panned Out In 1877

Drouthy Kansas, How Crops In Kansas Panned Out In 1877
Creator: Worrall, Henry
Date: 1877
The illustration, Drouthy Kansas, How Crops In Kansas Panned Out In 1877, was drawn by Henry Worrall and published in The Kansas Farmer.


Dust Storm

Dust Storm
Creator: Herschel C. Logan
Date: 1938
Woodcut entitled "Dust Storm" by Herschel C. Logan. The artist was a charter member of the influential Prairie Print Makers, a group dedicated to promoting print making and offering affordable art to collectors. Logan studied commercial art at the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. He directed the Consolidated Printing and Stationery Company in Salina, Kansas, for many years. Logan's printmaking career spanned just 18 years but his work received much acclaim.


Exodusters at Floral Hall, Topeka

Exodusters at Floral Hall, Topeka
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: July 5, 1879
This drawing from Harper's Weekly depicts the African-American refugees, called Exodusters, who were housed in Floral Hall on the Topeka Fairgrounds, near what is today the Expocentre. Many of these refugees are listening to a sermon or lecture being delivered on the platform. It was drawn by Henry Worrall.


Exodusters in Floral Hall, Topeka

Exodusters in Floral Hall, Topeka
Creator: Worrall, Henry, 1825-1902
Date: July 5, 1879
This drawing from Harper's Weekly depicts the living quarters of the African-American Exodusters housed in Floral Hall on the Topeka Fairgrounds. These emigrants were crowded into this building while waiting for more permanent lodgings and employment. The drawing was created by Henry Worrall.


Fodder in the Shock

Fodder in the Shock
Creator: Herschel C. Logan
Date: 1930
A black ink on long fiber bond paper woodcut showing a field of snow-covered haycocks with a farmhouse and barn in the background. The artist indicated this was "a composite scene from two or more sketches. Fodder in the Shock was drawn by Herschel C. Logan, who was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri , and shortly after his birth the family moved to Winfield, Kansas. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts for one year. Logan was a commercial and advertising artist in Salina, Kansas, until his retirement in 1968. He was a member of the Prairie Print Makers. After retirement, Logan moved to Santa Ana, California.


Geese

Geese
Creator: Herschel C. Logan
Date: 1927
A black ink on long fiber board paper woodcut of four geese with water in the foreground, by Herschel Logan. One of the Prairie Printmakers, Logan executed this work in 1927, and said this was "from a sketch done on the old boyhood farm near Winfield." Logan was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri, and the family moved to Winfield, Kansas shortly afterwards. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts. He worked as an advertising artist in Salina until his retirement in 1968. He moved to Santa Ana, California, where he died December 8, 1987.


Harper's Weekly newspaper page

Harper's Weekly newspaper page
Creator: Henry Worrall
Date: 1879
Illustrations from Harper's Weekly magazine depicting Exodusters. As life in the South worsened for Blacks after the Civil War, many left for more promising lands. Thousands came to Kansas in a great exodus (hence the name "Exodusters") during the 1870s, attracted by the state's free-state reputation established during the territorial era. These three illustrations are captioned, "The Colored Exodus - - Scenes at Topeka, Kansas - - From Sketches by H. Worrall." Henry Worrall was an early Kansas artist.


Hartley's Elevator

Hartley's Elevator
Creator: Herschel C. Logan
Date: 1932
A black ink on rag paper woodcut showing a country elevator with two boxcars sitting beside it According to the artist, the scene is set in Minneapolis, Kansas. Hartley's Elevator was drawn by Herschel C. Logan, who was born April 19, 1901 in Magnolia, Missouri , and shortly after his birth the family moved to Winfield, Kansas. He attended the Chicago Academy of Fine Arts for one year. Logan was a commercial and advertising artist in Salina, Kansas, until his retirement in 1968. He was a member of the Prairie Print Makers. After retirement, Logan moved to Santa Ana, California.


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