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Descriptive roll, Seventh Regiment, Cavalry, Kansas Civil War volunteers, volume 6

Descriptive roll, Seventh Regiment, Cavalry, Kansas Civil War volunteers, volume 6
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1861-1863
This is the descriptive roll for Civil War soldiers in the Seventh Regiment, Kansas Volunteer Cavalry. Information includes description, marital status, nativity, residence, muster information, and remarks. The index to the Kansas Adjutant General's Report, 1861-1865, (see link below) also gives the regiment and company the soldier served in.


Edmund G. Ross correspondence

Edmund G. Ross correspondence
Date: 1856-1865
Correspondence to and from Edmund G. Ross. A number of letters are from Ross to his wife Fannie Lathrop Ross. There is one letter from S. C. Pomeroy about Ross's request to raise a company of men. There are also a number of telegrams relating to military activities. During the Civil War Ross served in Company E of the 11th Kansas Cavalry. In 1866 he was appointed by the governor to fill the unexpired United States Senate term of James Lane, who had committed suicide. Ross served in the Senate until 1871. Transcriptions of some of the letters are included with the images of the originals.


Four soldiers from the 7th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry

Four soldiers from the 7th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry
Date: 1863
Portrait of Private Curtis P. Casey, Co. H; Private Dwight Chappell (Chappel), Co. F; Edgar Cove; and Sgt. George R. Ferris, Co. H, members of the 7th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry. The tintype was made in Butler, MO, 1863.


George Henry Hoyt

George Henry Hoyt
Date: Between 1865 and 1869
A portrait of George Henry Hoyt, a resident of Leavenworth, Kansas. He served as Kansas Attorney General from 1867 to 1869. During the Civil War, he was Captain of Company K, Seventh Kansas Volunteer Cavalry and promoted to Lieutenant Colonel of the Fifteenth Kansas Volunteer Cavalry.


John Brown Jr. correspondence

John Brown Jr. correspondence
Creator: Brown, Jr., John
Date: 1862
Letters from John Brown Jr. concerning the 7th Kansas Cavalry and their tendency to protect slaves rather than returning them to their owners. John Brown Jr. was the son of well known abolitionist, John Brown, Sr.


Marshall Cleveland

Marshall Cleveland
Date: 1861
This carte de visite shows Marshall Cleveland seated and holding two revolvers with a bowie knife. In 1861, Cleveland became Captain of Company H, Seventh Kansas Volunteer Cavalry, Jennison's Regiment. Cleveland resigned his commission and became a Jayhawker, stealing horses and terrorizing people in Kansas and Missouri. He was killed May 11,1862, at Marais des Cygnes by soldiers of the Sixth Kansas Volunteer Cavalry.


Members of the 7th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry

Members of the 7th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry
Date: Between 1861 and 1865
Photographs of members of several different companies of the 7th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry. The men include Capt. Francis M. Malone, Capt. William Jenkins, Lt. Frederick W. Emery, Lt. Russell W. Maryhugh, Lt. Bazil C. Sanders, Capt. Burr H. Bostwick, Lt. Edward Colbert, Sgt. Jacob Ruppelins, Adjutant General Joseph S. Martin, Lt. Andrew Downing, Lt. Charles L. Wall, and three unidentified members. Photographers include George W. Armstead & Henry White in Corinth, Mississippi, Howard & Hall in Corinth, Mississippi, Tuttle's Fine Art Gallery in Olathe, Kansas, and A. C. Nichols in Leavenworth, Kansas.


Muster out roll, Seventh Regiment, Cavalry, Kansas Civil War Volunteers, volume 1

Muster out roll, Seventh Regiment, Cavalry, Kansas Civil War Volunteers, volume 1
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1865
The muster out roll for Civil War soldiers in the Kansas Seventh Cavalry volunteer unit. The lists may include name, rank, age, when and where they mustered in, last date of pay, and remarks. The index to the Kansas Adjutant General's Report, 1861-1865, (see link below) also gives the regiment and company the soldier served in.


Samuel Ayers to Lyman Langdon

Samuel Ayers to Lyman Langdon
Date: January 7, 1859-July 6, 1864
Samuel Ayers was born in Massachusetts and lived in Defiance, Ohio, before coming to Kansas Territory, probably in 1859. These letters are written to Lyman Langdon, a friend from Defiance. Unless the letters were written while Ayers was with Civil War troops, the location in the letter heading is either Centreville or Moneka, Linn County. Ayers served as a chaplain for the Seventh Kansas Cavalry, which was led by Colonel Charles R. Jennison and later D. R. Anthony. He was mustered in October 14, 1861. The letters are very descriptive of both events and the areas through which Ayers traveled. A letter written January 7, 1859 contains a copy of a item published in the Lawrence Republican that is titled "Who is Responsible?" concerning hostile events in Linn and Bourbon counties. Mr. Ayers indicates to Langdon that he agrees with most of the content. The letter for April 8, 1861, expresses gratitude for the relief assistance the settlers have received from Ohio and that it had been critical to their survival. Ayers, writing Nov. 15, 1861, describes some troop movements and indicates that he is convinced that the "secessionists" must be treated harshly if they are to be defeated. The letter dated December 29, 1861, describes the capture and killing of a Confederate officer home on leave; the destruction caused by the 7th Kansas Cavalry near West Point, MO; various other activities; and his thoughts about the war. A letter written from Lawrence on April 5, 1862, tells of the various units stationed in the area. His letter for May 6, 1862 was written from Fort Riley, where the unit was ordered to provide escort along the route to New Mexico. However, the order was countermanded and the unit was sent east, eventually spending time in Corinth, Tennessee. Ayers provides descriptions of all of the communities from Lawrence to Fort Riley. Three letters written during June, 1862, provide details about the fortifications around Corinth, an important railroad junction and about how the secessionist supporters interacted with the Union troops and the activities of units in that region. Ayers' letter dated January 1, 1863, references the Emancipation Proclamation. Other letters from 1863 describe activities of bushwhackers and Quantrill's raid on Lawrence in the August 24, 1863 epistle. The last letter is dated July 6, 1864, from "camp near Lawrence." Samuel Ayers wrote that he was serving under a contract as a surgeon. Mr. Ayers had two sons, Samuel N. and John, who served in Company H of the Seventh Kansas Cavalry.


Samuel Ayres [Ayers?] to Lyman Langdon

Samuel Ayres [Ayers?] to Lyman Langdon
Creator: Ayres, Samuel
Date: January 7, 1859-July 6, 1864
Samuel Ayres [Ayers?] served as a chaplain for the Seventh Kansas Cavalry, which was led by Colonel Charles R. Jennison. He was mustered in October 14, 1861. Several of the Civil War letters in this collection have been digitized. They are written to Lyman Langdon of Defiance, Ohio, where Ayres lived before settling in Moneka, Linn County, Kansas. The letter dated December 29, 1861, describes the capture and killing of a Confederate officer home on leave; the destruction caused by the 7th Kansas Cavalry near West Point, MO; various other activities; and his thoughts about the war. A letter written from Lawrence on April 5, 1962, tells of the various units stationed in the area. The regiment eventually spent some time in Tennessee and, in a letter "in camp near Union City, Ten" dated June 12, 1862, Ayres describes how the secessionist supporters interacted with the Union troops and the activities of units in that region. Writing from his home in Moneka on June 1, 1863, he describes visits by bushwhackers and guerrillas. He also shares news about various areas of Union activity, including Vicksburg, MS.


William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody

William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody
Date: Between 1880 and 1889
A portrait of William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody who was born in Iowa but grew up in Leavenworth, Kansas. During the Civil War, William served in the 7th Kansas Cavalry Regiment. Later, he was chief of scouts for the Third Cavalry during the Indian Wars. He claimed to have worked many jobs, but he became world famous for his Wild West show. He got his nickname for supplying Kansas Pacific Railroad workers with bison meat.


Showing 1 - 11

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