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Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway workers at the shops in Topeka, Kansas Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway workers at the shops in Topeka, Kansas

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People - Notable People - Carter, Robert Lee, 1917-

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Airmail Special Letter: Robert Carter to Mckinley Burnett

Airmail Special Letter: Robert Carter to Mckinley Burnett
Date: March 31, 1953
Attorney Robert Carter acknowledges receipt of a copy of a letter from McKinley Burnett sent with an enclosed memo from Superintendent of Topeka Schools, Kenneth McFarland. Carter advises Burnett that if the McFarland proceeds in this (possible dismissal of Negro teachers) he would immediately initiate a court action. Carter further advises that he would be in Des Moines and that he would be happy to meet any teachers who have received "these notices."


Attorney Robert Carter to McKinley Burnett

Attorney Robert Carter to McKinley Burnett
Date: September 14, 1951
This letter dated September 14, 1951, is from NAACP Assistant Special Counsel Robert L. Carter to Topeka NAACP Chapter President McKinley Burnett. Carter advises Burnett that the National Chapter of the NAACP would require $5,000 to take the Brown case to the United States Supreme Court. However, Carter explained that the money would have to be raised locally and that nearby NAACP chapters could contribute if they so desired.


Judge Robert Lee Carter interview

Judge Robert Lee Carter interview
Creator: Carter, Robert Lee, 1917-
Date: October 5, 1992
This interview with Judge Robert Lee Carter was conducted by Jean VanDelinder. Carter was part of the Brown vs Topeka Board of Education legal team. He assisted the Topeka NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People) attorneys in developing their case against the Topeka Board of Education. Note: the audio quality of this recording is very poor making the interview difficult to hear. A transcription of the interview is available under "Text Version" below.


NAACP Legal Defense Fund to Charles Bledsoe

NAACP Legal Defense Fund to Charles Bledsoe
Date: September 18, 1950
In his reply to Topekan attorney Charles Bledsoe, NAACP legal counsel Robert L. Carter outlined his initial thoughts on strategies and approaches to the case. Two of Carter's main points were that the Topeka NAACP should recruit "as many plaintiffs and their parents from various grades from the lowest to the highest," and that the case be tried in a three-judge court in order to "by-pass the U.S. Court of Appeals and go directly into the U.S. Supreme Court." The letter from Charles Bledsoe prompting this reply is Kansas Memory item #213409.


Robert Carter to Herbert Bell

Robert Carter to Herbert Bell
Date: September 14, 1951
The letter, dated September 14, 1951, was sent to Herbert Bell, President of the Abilene Branch of the NAACP, by Robert Carter, NAACP Assistant Special Counsel. Carter's letter, similar to many he sent to NAACP chapters in Kansas and Missouri, urging them to assist in raising $5,000 necessary to take the Brown case to the U.S. Supreme Court.


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