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Military - Wars - Civil War - Battle of the Blue

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Showing 1 - 15 of 15 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


B.F. Dawson to Colonel of the Second Kansas militia

B.F. Dawson to Colonel of the Second Kansas militia
Creator: Dawson, B.F.
Date: Between 1865 and 1866
This letter is from B.F. Dawson to the Colonel of the Second Kansas Militia, in Topeka, Kansas. The letter contains Dawson's recollections of the Battle of the Blue, which happened on October 22, 1864, in Jackson County, Missouri. Dawson wrote the letter in Topeka, Kansas.


Battle of the Big Blue

Battle of the Big Blue
Creator: Reader, S. J.
Date: 1897
This painting depicts Union forces fighting Confederate soldiers at the Battle of the Big Blue River on October 22, 1864, the day before the defeat of Price at Westport. The artist, Samuel Reader, fought for the Union as part of the Second Kansas State Militia, whose members were was almost all from Shawnee County. Reader served as an officer in the "field and staff" of the militia with the rank of First Lieutenant, Assistant Quartermaster. In the Battle of the Big Blue he was captured by Confederates, who were on their way to Texas when Reader escaped and returned to his farm in southeast Kansas. In this painting, which is housed in a gilded wood frame (not shown), timber fences flank both sides of a tree-lined road. A stone building and horse-drawn caisson (ammunition chest) are visible to the right, and a mounted cannon is on the left. Armed men, wearing brown and blue coats, are scattered along the road. The Union infantry skirmish line, marked by a federal flag, recedes into the background. Confederate forces, with Confederate flag, are visible in the background to the left. Elizabeth Reader, the daughter of the artist, donated the painting in 1909.


Battle of the Blue

Battle of the Blue
Creator: Mileham, Benjamin D.
Date: 1896
This painting depicts the Battle of Byram's Ford (a.k.a. Battle of the Big Blue), which took place on October 22, 1864, in Jackson County, Missouri. During the battle, the 2nd Regiment of the Kansas State Militia, which was aided by the Topeka Battery of Artillery, fought the Confederate forces of Sterling Price. Captain Ross Burns commanded that artillery battery. Ross may have commissioned artist Benjamin Mileham to execute this painting. Mrs. Ross Burns later donated it the Shawnee County Commissioners and the Grand Army of Republic in memory of her then deceased husband.


G.W. Veale to General George W. Dietzler

G.W. Veale to General George W. Dietzler
Creator: Veale, George Washington, 1833-1916
Date: October 30, 1864
This letter is from G.W. Veale to General George W. Dietzler, Commander of the Kansas State Militia. Veale, who was colonel of the Second Kansas Militia, recounts his role and his regiments, in the Battle of the Blue. He wrote the letter from the headquarters of the 2nd Regiment, Kansas State Militia, in Topeka, Kansas.


Harvey Dwight Rice

Harvey Dwight Rice
Date: Between 1880 and 1890
This black and white photograph shows an illustration of Harvey Dwight Rice, (1821-1903), one of the founders of Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas. Rice came to the Kansas territory, in 1856, as a member of the Beecher Bible Company. He fought alongside Union forces at the Battle of the Blue and was involved in a few minor skirmishes during the war. In the early 1860s Rice and friend John Ritchie borrowed the money to purchase 160 acres of land in the central portion of the capital city. The site became the future home of Lincoln College, later renamed in 1868, Washburn College. He was instrumental in building the college from the ground up as he supervised the construction of the first building on the campus grounds. Rice was also appointed, in 1858, as a member of the original board of trustees. From 1901 to 1902, he served as president of the board. In 1902, Rice was recognized for his years of dedication and service to the college when the Science Hall, the first building built on the campus, was renamed Rice Hall. On June 11, 1903, Harvey Dwight Rice died at the age of eighty-two at his family farm east of the capital city.


Our Father

Our Father
Creator: Porterfield, Burt Russell
Date: Between 1920 and 1929
This is a biography of Jefferson Greene Porterfield. Included in the biography is a personal reminiscence of his participation in the Civil War. Porterfield was born in Pulaski County, Kentucky, on February 11, 1838, the son of Milton and Eliza Ann Collier Porterfield. The family moved west to Missouri and later Iowa and back to Missouri. In the winter of 1855-1856, Jefferson's father went to Kansas Territory and located claims near Holton in Jackson County. The family built a lob cabin and began farming the land. On August 23, 1862, he enlisted in the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry, Company B at Holton, Kansas. Porterfield describes the skirmishes the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry encountered including Prices' Raid, Battle of the Blue, and Mine Creek. In February, 1865, the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry was sent to Wyoming to Fort Bridger where they fought in the Battle of Platte River bridge. He was honorably discharged on August 30, 1865. Porterfield returned to Jackson County where he resumed farming and teaching. The biography also contains marriage and family information.


Samuel J. Reader's autobiography, volume 3

Samuel J. Reader's autobiography, volume 3
Creator: Reader, Samuel James, 1836-1914
Date: October 12-30, 1864
This autobiography is based on entries from Samuel Reader's 1864 diary. The diary entries and personal recollections of the Battle of the Big Blue, Price's Raid, and the Battle of Mine Creek were used to compile the autobiography. The autobiography also includes a number of water color and pen illustrations drawn by Reader.


Samuel J. Reader correspondence

Samuel J. Reader correspondence
Date: 1895-1914
These letters from numerous individuals were received by Samuel James Reader. Only two of the letters, dated September 24, 1898, and October 11, 1899, were written by Reader. Many of the letters refer to the Battle of the Blue, which was Reader's only war experience. The battle occurred on October 22, 1864, in Jackson County, Missouri. The authors of some letters wish to thank Reader for sending them photographs relating to the battle, and others are former comrades from the 2nd Kansas Regiment responding to Reader's letters. Reader received letters from Salmon Brown, the surviving son of John Brown, and Jesse R. Grant, son of Ulysses S. Grant. Six of the letters, dated 1908 and 1909, come from Reader's "boyhood acquaintance" Joseph Smith III, who lived in Independence, Missouri. In one letter, Smith reminisces on time spent in La Harpe, Illinois, where Reader once lived. Smith also acknowledges that he was an abolitionist, who "sympathized with Kansas and her Free State men who prevented the accomplishment of the wicked intent of the Missouri Compromise."


Samuel Reader lanternslide

Samuel Reader lanternslide
Creator: Reader, Samuel J.
Date: between 1866 and 1913
This is a hand painted lanternslide in handmade wood frame. This slide is part of a collection made by Samuel Reader between 1866 and 1913. Reader was a Kansas farmer who was active in the early Topeka community. He built two of his own homes, served in the Civil War, and wrote in a diary nearly every day for 64 years. This slide depicts four Union soldiers surrounding a campfire and being guarded by a Confederate soldier. Reader and other soldiers in the 2nd Kansas Militia were captured by Confederates at the Battle of the Big Blue on October 22, 1864. The slide's reference to "Southern hospitality" is ironic given that the captured Union soldiers received little food or water. On October 23 they mixed flour with water, placed the dough on a forked stick, and cooked it over a campfire. Reader escaped a few days later by disguising himself as a Confederate soldier and pretending to be in search of a lost horse.


Samuel Reader lanternslide

Samuel Reader lanternslide
Creator: Reader, Samuel J.
Date: between 1866 and 1913
This is a hand painted lanternslide depicting the face of a frightened man, his mouth hanging open in a frown, inside a handmade wooden frame. The slide can be manipulated so the man's eyes and tongue move from left to right. Part of a collection made by Samuel James Reader documenting his experiences in the Civil War, showing "How some of the boys / looked when the / Rebels / began to shoot bullets" at the Battle of the Big Blue on October 22, 1864. Samuel was a soldier in the 2nd Kansas State Militia, and kept a diary that included his experiences at this battle and as a prisoner of war. Reader was an early settler in Kansas, building his own home just north of Topeka. He began painting slides in 1866 and continued throughout much of his life, holding magic lantern shows with the local community by putting on slide shows in his house or at church.


Samuel Reader lanternslide

Samuel Reader lanternslide
Creator: Reader, Samuel J.
Date: between 1866 and 1913
This is a hand painted lanternslide with handmade wooden frame. This slide is part of a collection made by Samuel James Reader documenting his experiences in the Civil War. It shows Union soldiers at to the Battle of the Big Blue on October 22, 1864. Reader was a soldier in the 2nd Kansas State Militia, and kept a diary that included his experiences at this battle and as a prisoner of war. Reader was an early settler in Kansas, building his own home just north of Topeka. He began painting slides in 1866 and continued throughout much of his life, holding magic lantern shows for the local community in his house and at church.


Samuel Reader lanternslide

Samuel Reader lanternslide
Creator: Reader, Samuel J.
Date: between 1866 and 1913
This is a hand painted lanternslide with handmade wooden frame. This slide is part of a collection of slides made by Samuel James Reader depicting his experiences in the Civil War. It shows the Second Kansas State Militia leaving Topeka on Oct. 12, 1864, and headed for battle. Reader rode his horse, Fox, and later noted that the animal was so excited he passed to the front of the line with the commander. Reader was a Kansas farmer who was active in the early Topeka community. He built two of his own homes, served in the Civil War, and wrote in a diary nearly every day for 64 years. Reader began painting slides in 1866 and continued throughout much of his life, holding magic lantern shows for the local community in his house and at church.


Samuel Reader lanternslide, Capturing a Yank at Big Blue

Samuel Reader lanternslide, Capturing a Yank at Big Blue
Creator: Reader, Samuel J.
Date: between 1866 and 1913
This is a hand painted lanternslide with handmade wooden frame. This slide is part of a collection made by Samuel James Reader documenting his experiences in the Civil War. It shows the capture of a soldier during the Battle of the Big Blue on October 22, 1864, and may depict Reader's own story. He was a soldier in the 2nd Kansas State Militia and was captured during the battle, then later escaped by disguising himself as a Confederate soldier. Reader kept a diary that included his experiences at this battle and as a prisoner of war. Reader was an early settler in Kansas, building his own home just north of Topeka. He began painting slides in 1866 and continued throughout much of his life, holding magic lantern shows for the local community in his house and at church.


Society of the Anniversary of the Battle of the Blue minutes and roster of the 2nd Regiment, Kansas militia

Society of the Anniversary of the Battle of the Blue minutes and roster of the 2nd Regiment, Kansas militia
Date: 1895-1905
This notebook contains the roster of the 2nd Regiment of the Kansas Militia during the Battle of the Blue, which occurred on October 22, 1864, in Jackson County, Missouri. Members of the regiment are divided by company and identified by rank. Some individuals are listed as killed, wounded, or taken prisoner, in addition to their place of residence. The notebook also contains the meeting minutes for the Society of the Anniversary of the Battle of the Blue. Surviving members of the 2nd Regiment convened on May 30, 1895, in Topeka, Kansas, and voted for a permanent organization to meet on October 22 of each year. Samuel J. Reader was elected secretary.


William Brown to Sarah Brown

William Brown to Sarah Brown
Creator: Brown, William
Date: October 26, 1864
This letter, written by William R. Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, was addressed to his sister Sarah Brown, who was away at a teaching position in Massachusetts. William described his role as a soldier in the state militia during the Battle of the Blue and the Battle of Westport and rejoiced in the Union victories there. He also discussed the emotional state of the troops, of whom he says many were at first unwilling to fight and were a "disgrace to Kansas." William related news about the battles and the ultimate defeat of Sterling Price and the "rebel" troops, who were forced to retreat south. William also mentioned riding a railroad line back to Lawrence.


Showing 1 - 15

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