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Albert Chapman Ellithorpe

Albert Chapman Ellithorpe
Date: Between 1861 and 1865
This black and white photograph shows Albert Chapman Ellithorpe wearing a military uniform, (1824-1907). A commander of Union forces during the Civil War, he recruited and organized with the 12th Illinois Cavalry. His duties quickly changed when President Abraham Lincoln appointed him in 1862, to serve as Lieutenant in the First Indian Home Guards Regiment. The volunteer infantry regiment, organized on May 22, 1862 in Le Roy, Kansas, was comprised of whites, refugee Creek and Seminole Indians, and African Americans. The regiment served mostly in the Indian Territory but ventured into Kansas, Missouri, and Arkansas. Lieut. Ellithorpe and his regiment fought in a number of battles and skirmishes from Prairie Grove to Willow Springs. He and his men also followed Confederate General Sterling Price through western Missouri. After the war, he engaged in the business of heavy contracting and the inventions of mechanical devices. One of the inventions that he is best known for is the air brake system used in elevators. On February 19, 1907, Albert Chapman Ellithorpe passed away at the age of eighty-three.


Alfred Pleasonton

Alfred Pleasonton
Date: Between 1861 and 1865
This is a photograph of General Alfred Pleasonton who commanded the District of Central Missouri and the District of St. Louis in 1864. He and his troops defeated Gen. Sterling Price at Westport, Battle of Byram's Ford and Marais des Cygnes.


Battle of the Blue

Battle of the Blue
Creator: Mileham, Benjamin D.
Date: 1896
This painting depicts the Battle of Byram's Ford (a.k.a. Battle of the Big Blue), which took place on October 22, 1864, in Jackson County, Missouri. During the battle, the 2nd Regiment of the Kansas State Militia, which was aided by the Topeka Battery of Artillery, fought the Confederate forces of Sterling Price. Captain Ross Burns commanded that artillery battery. Ross may have commissioned artist Benjamin Mileham to execute this painting. Mrs. Ross Burns later donated it the Shawnee County Commissioners and the Grand Army of Republic in memory of her then deceased husband.


Campaign against Sterling Price

Campaign against Sterling Price
Creator: Davis, George
Date: 1864
This is a map showing the campaign against Sterling Price. It accompanied a report by Major General S. R. Curtis, U. S. Army and was copied from the Atlas to Accompany the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, 1861-1865 [War of the Rebellion], Series 1, Vol. XLI, Part 1.


Candle lantern

Candle lantern
Date: between 1800 and 1850
This is a pressed and pierced tin candle lantern. Half-round lantern has clear glass pane beneath pierced conical top. Hinged metal door with snap latch opens to reveal candle socket on interior. Hiram C. Coville brought this lantern to Kansas Territory from Ohio. The Covilles were early settlers, landing first in Lawrence and quickly moving west to the Topeka area in 1855. Hiram was a soldier in the 2nd Kansas Militia, Company B, when he was killed during the Price Raid in 1864. His son, Allen, also used the lantern on the farm in Shawnee County.


Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill
Creator: Chadwick, Charles
Date: February 4, 1865
Charles Chadwick of Lawrence, Kansas, writes to Hiram Hill of Massachusettes detailing many of the events surrounding Confederate General Sterling Price's invasion and the steps Kansans took in preparation for an expected attack. In particular, Chadwick discusses the back and forth battles along the Missouri/Kansas border between Price and Union commander, General Alfred Pleasonton, that took place in the Fall of 1864.


Charles D. Puckett to Arthur Capper

Charles D. Puckett to Arthur Capper
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: July 11, 1915
This letter from Charles D. Puckett of Dallas, Texas, to Kansas governor Arthur Capper of Topeka discusses claims from the Price Raid of 1864. Puckett's in-laws, Washington and Mary Ann Boggs, had property confiscated during the Price raid. Following the raid, Puckett's in-laws were given bonds totaling $500. However, the bonds were given to a lawyer and lost. Consequently, Puckett's letter is intended to receive compensation from Kansas for the elderly Mrs. Boggs.


General Samuel Ryan Curtis

General Samuel Ryan Curtis
Date: Between 1861 and 1865
This is a photograph of Samuel Ryan Curtis, who was born near Champlain, New York. Curtis graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1831, and moved to Ohio, where he was a lawyer and worked on several civilian jobs. During the Mexican-American War, he was appointed a colonel and served as military governor of several occupied cities. At the beginning of the Civil War, Curtis was given command of the Army of the Southwest. In March 1862, his army won the Battle of Pea Ridge in northwest Arkansas. Later he was assigned to command the Department of Kansas & Indian Territory. In 1864, Curtis and his troops fought against the Confederate invasion led by Maj. Gen. Sterling Price. Curtis gathered the forces of his department together, including several regiments of Kansas State Militia, calling his force the Army of the Border. Price was halted by Curtis' victory at the Battle of Westport. After the war, he returned to Iowa where he was involved with the Union Pacific Railroad until his death the following year in Council Bluffs, Iowa.


Governor Lorenzo Lewelling, Claims, 1893

Governor Lorenzo Lewelling, Claims, 1893
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1893-1895: Lewelling)
Date: January 27, 1893
This folder contains correspondence on claims made in 1893 to Governor Lewelling's office. This specific claim deals with Price's Raid.


Joseph Orville Shelby

Joseph Orville Shelby
Date: Between 1860 and 1865
These two black and white photographs show Confederate cavalry general Joseph Orville Shelby, (1830-1897). Shelby, a wealthy plantation owner from Waverly, Missouri, began his military career in 1861, organizing and recruiting volunteers for the Missouri State Guard. Commissioned to the rank of captain, he led troops through the battles of Carthage, Wilson's Creek, and Pea Ridge. Recognized for his effective leadership skills and military strategies Shelby rose in the ranks to colonel in 1862 and later brigadier general in 1863. He led his cavalry known as the "Iron Brigade" through the Trans-Mississippi theater into a number of major battles that included Prairie Grove, Little Blue, Westport and Price's Raid. In the closing days of the Civil War Shelby was promoted to major general but refused to surrender and led approximately 1,000 of his remaining troops into Mexico. The men, recognized as "the undefeated rebel", assisted Sterling Price in founding Carlota, a colony for ex-Confederate soldiers. Shelby eventually returned in the summer of 1867 to Missouri where he engaged in farming and various business ventures. In 1893 President Grover Cleveland appointed Shelby U.S. Marshal to the Western District. A position he held until his death on February 13, 1897. Burial was conducted at Forest Hill Cemetery in Kansas City, Missouri.


Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence

Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1867
This item is correspondence received by the Adjutant General's Office. Josiah B. McAfee succeeded Thomas J. Anderson as Kansas Adjutant General in August 1867. The correspondence includes letters from citizens seeking to reenter the armed forces, orders for the disarmament of state militia arsenals, and claims for service records and pensions. A letter, dated June 25, 1867, from former Kansas Governor Charles Robinson, states that a list of officers commissioned during his term is no longer in his possession. Also included are several statements taken by district court clerk Mitchell G. Williams in New Albany, Wilson County, Kansas, regarding the theft and killing of horses by Osage Indians.


Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence

Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1869
This is correspondence of the Adjutant General's Office, headed by Josiah B. McAfee. Topics include damage claims, claims for provisions provided to the militia, reports of hostile Indians near Ellsworth, Caney, Hays, and Clyde, and claims of service referred to the Price's Raid Commission. A muster roll lists the members of an independent company of the militia known as the Scandinavian Rangers organized around a Swedish colony in present-day Scandia, Kansas. Some letters have faded considerably and typed transcriptions are included.


Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence

Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1868
This correspondence received by the Adjutant General's Office, headed by Josiah B. McAfee, discusses a variety of topics including the burial places of deceased Kansas soldiers, requests for recruiting commissions to raise a company of militiamen, and "Price's Raid Claims." There is frequent correspondence with Philip M. Sheridan, in command of the Missouri Department in Fort Hays, and letters from concerned citizens of Sibley, Kansas, worried that Indian presence and shrinking provisions are forcing people to leave the area.


Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence, 1870

Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence, 1870
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1870
This correspondence of the Kansas Adjutant General includes letters received on a variety of topics including supplies, ammunition, Indian relations, depositions, orders, commissions, enrollments and others. Letters on Indian relations refer mostly to conflicts between white settlers and a group of Indians near the forks of the Solomon River. Price Raid claims are also addressed. Letters were often addressed to Governor James Harvey or to Adjutant General David Whittaker.


Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence, 1871

Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence, 1871
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1871
This correspondence includes letters received by the Kansas Adjutant General on a variety of topics but most of the letters request arms or troops to protect settlers from feared raids by Indians in the area. Many letters also inform the state of the enrollment of local militias for such protection in absence of assistance by state units. Requests for information on filing claims for damage from Indian raids are also included, as are requests on Price Raid claims. The correspondents often identify groups of Indians and their location. Tribes mentioned include the Cheyenne, Sioux, Comanche, Kiowa, Pawnee, Otoe, and Omaha. March 31st correspondence from the Department of the Missouri commander John Pope at Leavenworth informs Governor James Harvey of Indians given permission by the Indian Bureau to hunt buffalo between the Solomon and Arkansas rivers, particularly Red Cloud and other bands of Sioux. An April 4th letter from Governor Harvey orders Adjutant General David Whittaker to proceed to the frontier to inform the settlements of such permission and to avoid conflict.


Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence, 1872-1873

Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence, 1872-1873
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1872-1873
This correspondence of the Kansas Adjutant General includes letters received by Colonel David Whittaker on a variety of topics including supplies, claims for services, Indian damage claims, Price Raid claims, commissions, enrollments and others.


Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence, 1874

Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence, 1874
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1874
This correspondence includes letters received by C. A. Morris, the Kansas Adjutant General, on a variety of topics but most of the letters request arms or troops to protect settlers from feared raids by Indians in the area. Many letters also inform the state of the enrollment of local militias for such protection in absence of assistance by state units. Requests for information on filing claims for damage from Indian raids are also included, as are requests on Price Raid claims. Many of the letters are addressed to Governor Thomas Osborn. Many official or unofficial militia units enrolled by local communities express an urgent desire to receive orders to pursue the Indians on the southern border of Kansas. Indian tribes mentioned include the Cheyenne, Osage and Pawnee.


Leigh R. Webber to John Stillman Brown

Leigh R. Webber to John Stillman Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: December 23, 1864
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Troy, Vermont, addressed to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber discusses Kansas politics, particularly the debate between supporters and critics of Senator James H. Lane. He also remarks on the "late successes of the Union armies," and worries that political tensions with Great Britain may escalate into another war.


Mine Creek battle site, Linn County, Kansas

Mine Creek battle site, Linn County, Kansas
Date: Between 1950 and 1980
Four photographs of Samuel Tucker showing points of interest at the Mine Creek battlefield in Linn County, Kansas. On October 25, 1864, on the banks of Mine Creek, two Union brigades of approximately 2,500 troops defeated approximately 7,000 Confederates from General Sterling Price's Army of Missouri. Federal Colonels Frederick W. Benteen and John H. Philips led the attack in one of the largest cavalry battles of the Civil War and a major battle fought in Kansas. After this battle, Union forces continued their pursuit of Price's army into Missouri, Arkansas, and Indian Territory (Oklahoma) ending the Confederate threat to Kansas. In 1974 the Kansas legislature approved acquisition of a 120-acre parcel of the battlefield site. An additional 160 acres was purchased in 1970. The site was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. A visitor center opened at the site Saturday, October 24, 1998, the 134th anniversary of the battle.


Muster Roll of Captain Thomas Archer, Company D, Colored Troops

Muster Roll of Captain Thomas Archer, Company D, Colored Troops
Date: October 12, 1864-October 26, 1864
Muster Roll of Captain Thomas Archer, Company D Colored, Troops Irregular Service from October 12, 1864 to October 26, 1864. The muster roll contains soldiers' names, the dates joined, dates ordered to active service, dates relieved from duty, and the number of days in actual service. In the fall of 1864, Confederate General Sterling Price led 12,000 cavalry soldiers through Missouri and Kansas. In response, Kansas Governor Thomas Carney called for the State Militia to take up arms. On October 10, Major General Samuel R. Curtis issued General Order No. 54, which declared martial law and directed all white and black men between the ages of 18 and 60 years to gather arms and serve in temporary military service. Captain Archer's Company D Coloured troop consisted of black citizens from Topeka and it was attached to the 2nd Regiment and fought at the Battle of Little Blue River on October 21, 1864, in Jackson County, Missouri.


Our Father

Our Father
Creator: Porterfield, Burt Russell
Date: Between 1920 and 1929
This is a biography of Jefferson Greene Porterfield. Included in the biography is a personal reminiscence of his participation in the Civil War. Porterfield was born in Pulaski County, Kentucky, on February 11, 1838, the son of Milton and Eliza Ann Collier Porterfield. The family moved west to Missouri and later Iowa and back to Missouri. In the winter of 1855-1856, Jefferson's father went to Kansas Territory and located claims near Holton in Jackson County. The family built a lob cabin and began farming the land. On August 23, 1862, he enlisted in the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry, Company B at Holton, Kansas. Porterfield describes the skirmishes the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry encountered including Prices' Raid, Battle of the Blue, and Mine Creek. In February, 1865, the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry was sent to Wyoming to Fort Bridger where they fought in the Battle of Platte River bridge. He was honorably discharged on August 30, 1865. Porterfield returned to Jackson County where he resumed farming and teaching. The biography also contains marriage and family information.


Preston Bierce Plumb

Preston Bierce Plumb
Date: Between 1880 and 1890
This black and white photograph shows Preston Bierce Plumb, (1837-1891). Plumb a newspaper editor and publisher from Berkshire, Ohio, migrated, 1856, to the Kansas territory. A supporter of the Free State movement and founder of Emporia, Kansas, in 1857, Plumb was one of Kansas' prominent leaders. In 1858, he was a delegate to the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention. Three years later, in 1861, Plumb was elected as a Republican to the Kansas House of Representatives. The start of the Civil War put a temporary hold on Plumb's political career, when he enlisted in the Union Army as a second lieutenant with the 11th Kansas Infantry. When the regiment was reassigned as the 11th Kansas Cavalry, in 1863, Plumb served as captain, major, and lieutenant colonel. During the war he was involved in several skirmishes and battles including: Prairie Grove, Price's Raid, and Westport. At the close of the war, Plumb returned to Kansas. He resumed his political career by serving in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1867 to 1868. Plumb did not seek reelection, in 1869, but returned to private life in Emporia, Kansas. For several years Plumb practiced law and banking until 1877 when he was elected to the U.S. Senate. He served for fourteen years as a U.S. Senator from Kansas and was responsible for passing major legislation that preserved the conservation of natural resources in the United States. On December 20, 1891, Preston Bierce Plumb passed away at the age of fifty-four while serving in office.


Price Raid

Price Raid
Creator: Reader, Samuel James
Date: 1865
This watercolor with pencil shading was done by Samuel J. Reader of Indianola, Kansas. The painting depicts Confederate soldiers marching Union prisoners of war while a haystack burns in the background. The artist was an eyewitness to the scene, having been captured with other members of the Second Kansas Militia following General Sterling Price's Raid into Kansas. The Price Raid was a multi-day running battle that happened very near the Kansas-Missouri border in the fall of 1864. Samuel Reader was Quartermaster for the Second Kansas during the raid's Battle of the Big Blue on October 22, where Union forces were routed. The prisoners later were marched to Tyler, Texas. Reader escaped by tricking his captors into believing he was a Confederate soldier. A four-day walk brought him home to Indianola, just north of Topeka, where he recorded his adventures in a journal.


Price Raid Claims

Price Raid Claims
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: 1915
This file includes correspondence relating to bonds and claims owed to residents in Kansas affected by the Price Raid during the Civil War. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.


R.N. Hershfield to his commanding officer

R.N. Hershfield to his commanding officer
Creator: Hershfield, R.N.
Date: October 20, 1864
A telegram from R.N. Hershfield to his commanding officer relaying information on General Blunt's encounter with Sterling Price at Lexington, Missouri.


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