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People - Notable Kansans - Monroe, Lilla Day, 1858-1929

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An epoch marking opinion by Justice John Dawson of the Supreme Court of Kansas

An epoch marking opinion by Justice John Dawson of the Supreme Court of Kansas
Creator: Monroe, Lilla Day, 1858-1929
Date: 1921
Lilla Day Monroe authored this pamphlet on behalf of the Topeka Good Government Club's Committee on Legislation. It includes excerpts concerning the property rights of married women and the rights of children to inherit from their mother. The pamphlet discusses the efforts of the Good Government Club of Topeka to secure passage of a law supporting property rights for women. Monroe was writing about an opinion of Justice John Dawson of the Kansas Supreme Court in case 104 (pp. 47-57), which she felt provided legal interpretation supporting women's property rights. She applauded the support for abused wives but felt the opinion did not adequately discuss the rights of children. Her retelling of the plantiff's case describes in detail the abuses that Ida Doe suffered at the hands of her husband.


Campaign card for Lorraine Wooster

Campaign card for Lorraine Wooster
Date: May 9, 1916
A campaign postcard for Lorraine (Lizzie) Wooster, candidate for State Superintendent of Public Instruction. The card was mailed to Mr. C.C. Yetter of Collyer, Kansas from Lilla Day Monroe, Topeka, Kansas.


Chivalry or the Ballot!  Which? Or Aren't You Asking too Much for That Seat, Brother?

Chivalry or the Ballot! Which? Or Aren't You Asking too Much for That Seat, Brother?
Creator: Monroe, Lilla Day, 1858-1929
Date: November 5, 1912
This leaflet was prepared and distributed by the Good Government Club of Topeka. It was supporting the passage of the women's voting rights amendment on the November 5, 1912 ballot. The pamphlet addresses the question that if women want equal rights they should not expect courtesies from men in a somewhat aggressive manner. It was authored by Lilla Day Monroe, president of the Good Government Club.


Kansas Womans Journal, October, 1922

Kansas Womans Journal, October, 1922
Creator: Kansas Womans Journal Publishing Company
Date: October 1922
The Kansas Womans Journal, vol. 1, no. 11, October, 1922, contains the following articles: "To The Women Voters Of Kansas", "Equal Citizenship Bill Passes Congress", "Some Ku-Klux Klan History", and a list of "Topeka Business Women". The Womans Journal, was published in Topeka, Kansas, by the Kansas Womans Journal Publishing Company and was the Women's Republican official organ. The editor was Lilla Day Monroe.


Lilla Day Monroe

Lilla Day Monroe
Date: Between 1890 and 1899
Lilla Day Monroe, 1858-1929, was a Kansas journalist who established and edited "The Club Woman" and "The Kansas Woman's Journal." As editor of "The Kansas Woman's Journal," Monroe solicited reminiscences of pioneer life from Kansas women, receiving hundreds of responses. She organized these reminiscences into a collection, and published many of them in the journal. She was also an active supporter of women's suffrage, being a member of the Kansas State Suffrage Association and serving as its president for several years.


Lilla Day Monroe

Lilla Day Monroe
Date: Between 1883 and 1889
Lilla Day Monroe, 1858-1929, was a Kansas journalist who established and edited "The Club Woman" and "The Kansas Woman's Journal." As editor of "The Kansas Woman's Journal," Monroe solicited reminiscences of pioneer life from Kansas women, receiving hundreds of responses. She organized these reminiscences into a collection, and published many of them in the journal. She was also an active supporter of women's suffrage, being a member of the Kansas State Suffrage Association and serving as its president for several years.


Lilla Day Monroe

Lilla Day Monroe
Date: July 15, 1922
Lilla Day Monroe, 1858-1929, was a Kansas journalist who established and edited "The Club Woman" and "The Kansas Woman's Journal." As editor of "The Kansas Woman's Journal," Monroe solicited reminiscences of pioneer life from Kansas women, receiving hundreds of responses. She organized these reminiscences into a collection, and published many of them in the journal. She was also an active supporter of women's suffrage, being a member of the Kansas State Suffrage Association and serving as its president for several years.


Lilla Day Monroe and Lillian Mitchner

Lilla Day Monroe and Lillian Mitchner
Date: Between 1890 and 1910
Lilla Day Monroe (left) was one of Topeka's leading citizens during the early part of the twentieth century. Over the course of her life, she served as president of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, editor of "The Club Member" and "The Kansas Woman's Journal," and as a founding member of the Good Government Club. Lillian Mitchner (right) was state president of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU).


Sister, are You Totin' Fair?

Sister, are You Totin' Fair?
Creator: Monroe, Lilla Day, 1858-1929
Date: November 5, 1912
This leaflet urges voters to support the proposed amendment to the Kansas constitution for voting rights for women. It specifically addresses what women should be doing to see that the amendment was passed by the male voters of the state on the November 5, 1912. This pamphlet was distributed by the Good Government Club of Topeka and Lilla Day Monroe was president of the group. The other officers of the organization are also listed as well as endorsements from some prominent people.


Teachers' salaries

Teachers' salaries
Creator: The Club Member
Date: December 1906
In this article, Elizabeth J. Hauser describes how the disparity between male and female teachers' salaries is due in large part to the fact that women do not have the right to vote. According to the author, in the states of Wyoming, Utah, Colorado, and Idaho--where women did have full suffrage--teachers' salaries were higher overall and women received salaries equal to those of their male counterparts.


The annual K.E.S.A. convention

The annual K.E.S.A. convention
Creator: The Club Member
Date: December 1907
This article discusses the most recent meeting of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, held in Topeka. The main business conducted at the meeting was discussion about whether or not the Kansas chapter should withdraw from the national association. Lila Day Monroe, president of the K.E.S.A., offered her reasons for supporting this withdrawal. Her resolutions explain the goals of the K.E.S.A. and are intended to inform readers of The Club Member about this very important decision. The vote on the measure was almost unanimously in favor of withdrawal. The article also notes that at this meeting the organization voted to make The Club Member their official magazine.


The Gee-Gee's Mother Goose

The Gee-Gee's Mother Goose
Creator: Monroe, Lilla Day, 1858-1929
Date: 1912
An autographed copy of suffragist writing by Lilla Day Monroe. She writes that her intentions are to show "the 'bloody' seriousness of it all, smile now and then, and to enlist also the children on the side of mother." Monroe was a Kansas journalist who established and edited "The Club Woman" and "The Kansas Woman's Journal." As an editor, Monroe solicited reminiscences of pioneer life from Kansas women, receiving hundreds of responses. She organized these reminiscences into a collection and published many of them in the journal. She was also an active supporter of women's suffrage, being a member of the Kansas State Suffrage Association and serving as its president for several years.


Twenty-fifth annual convention of the K.E.S.A.

Twenty-fifth annual convention of the K.E.S.A.
Creator: Monroe, Lilla Day, 1858-1929
Date: December 1908
This article outlines the resolutions made at the annual convention of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association meeting on October 30, 1908. These resolutions explain the reasons why these women supported female suffrage, including their belief that "we deem it more direct, more womanly, more dignified to cast our own ballot than to ask some man for his vote on a matter that concerns us vitally." As stated near the beginning of the article, the members of this group took their cue from the declaration of women's rights from the first suffrage convention in the United States, held at Seneca Falls, New York, in 1848.


Woman suffrage ribbon

Woman suffrage ribbon
Creator: Trapp Printing Company
Date: 1912
Small, triangular-shaped piece of gold-colored linen. Small, round political button pinned to the top center. This ribbon may have belonged to Lilla Day Monroe. Monroe was a journalist and lobbyist, with one of her main campaigns being woman suffrage, or women's right to vote in elections. In Kansas, woman suffrage passed by a popular vote in 1912.


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