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Objects and Artifacts - Tools & Equipment for Communication - Musical

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Showing 1 - 9 of 9 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Band, Kansas City, Kansas

Band, Kansas City, Kansas
Date: Between 1939 and 1940
A view of a band performing in Kansas City as part of the Work Progress Administration's Federal Music Project. Also visible is a large stone building immediately behind the band.


Bugle

Bugle
Creator: William M. Hostmann Company
Date: between 1910 and 1916
1912 variation of the 1894 pattern B Flat Infantry Bugle. Brass bugle with steel mouthpiece. The bugle belonged to Faustino Julian Domingo. Domingo was born in the Philippines and was brought to the United States by his American teacher in 1904. He settled in Lawrence, Kansas, where he finished high school and joined the Kansas National Guard. In 1915, a Topeka newspaper described Domingo as an "expert bugler." After working as a drill master and battalion instructor, he served in the Mexican Campaign in 1916 and with the 137th Infantry in France during World War I. Exposure to poison gas during that war caused a respiratory illness that forced Domingo to retire from the National Guard 1944. He was on active duty in World War II at the time of his retirement. He died in 1961.


Child's harmonica

Child's harmonica
Creator: Beaver
Date: between 1920 and 1931
This Diatonic harmonica with silver cover-plates, brass reed-plates, and a black and orange wood comb belonged to Dean Thomas of Dighton, Kansas. Dean came down with appendicitis on the first day of a major two-day blizzard and was unable to reach a hospital until after his appendix had ruptured. Dean Thomas died at age 10 on March 31, 1931. After his death, his mother kept many of Dean's belongings, including this harmonica, in a trunk.


Harmonica

Harmonica
Creator: M. Horner, Inc.
Date: between 1928 and 1935
Hohner Chromatic harmonica with box. Belonged to Roy Faulkner (1911-1981), the "Lonesome Cowboy." He sang and played guitar, violin, musical saw, and harmonica on radio stations throughout the Midwest, including WIBW in Topeka. Faulkner also worked at KFKB in Milford, Kansas, a station owned by John R. Brinkley, the infamous "Goat Gland Doctor." In addition to radio performances, Faulkner also toured the U.S. with the Purple Sage Riders (not Gene Autry's Riders of the Purple Sage). He retired from show business in 1950, at which time he retired to Topeka.


Melodeon

Melodeon
Creator: Carhart, James
Date: between 1857 and 1869
Abolitionist John Brown gave this melodeon to his daughter, Ruth Brown Thompson, as a wedding present. It was played at his funeral on December 8, 1859. Brown originally purchased the melodeon from a musician in New York. It was manufactured by Carhart & Needham Organs and Melodeons of New York, and patent dates stamped on the instrument range from 1846 to 1857.


Musical saw

Musical saw
Date: between 1925 and 1940
Musical saw with copper blade and rhinestone inlay on wooden handle. Belonged to Roy Faulkner (1911-1981), the "Lonesome Cowboy." He sang and played guitar, violin, musical saw, and harmonica on radio stations throughout the Midwest, including WIBW in Topeka. Faulkner also worked at KFKB in Milford, Kansas, a station owned by John R. Brinkley, the infamous "Goat Gland Doctor." In addition to radio performances, Faulkner also toured the U.S. with the Purple Sage Riders (not Gene Autry's Riders of the Purple Sage). He retired from show business in 1950, at which time he retired to Topeka. He bought the musical saw from Sears & Roebuck when he was 17 years old.


Pence Band baton

Pence Band baton
Date: between 1894 and 1940
This baton belonged to Charles S. Pence, who founded the Pence Band of Shawnee County. The group quickly developed a fine reputation and was in demand in communities throughout the county. Charles's son, Walter Pence, also used the baton as conductor of the band.


Violin

Violin
Date: between 1820 and 1850
Violin with spruce belly and maple back and ribs, made by Wurlitzer. The bridge was replaced in the 1890s. Originally owned by James Limerick, who brought the instrument to Kansas Territory in 1855. The violin later was given to James Darnell. The Limerick and Darnell families became friends en route to Kansas, on the banks of the Grand River in Missouri. Limerick played Irish fiddle tunes around the campfire at night.


Violin case

Violin case
Date: between 1800 and 1900
John S. Rhodes donated this primitively carved wooden violin case to the museum in 1915. Rhodes operated a "curiosity shop" in Topeka, Kansas. He claimed the case was carved from a cedar log around 1830 and used by a fur trapper or explorer traveling in the Rocky Mountains.


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