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Showing 1 - 13 of 13 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Asa Tongat, Kiowa man, in Indian Territory

Asa Tongat, Kiowa man, in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of Asa Tongat is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. Asa Tongat is identified on the image as being Kiowa, but another known example of the same image identifies him as Kiowa-Apache. William Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to the acquisition of the photographs. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or, as in this case, are deemed likely to be his work.


Composite of Satanta and other Native American images

Composite of Satanta and other Native American images
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1867 and 1875
This carte-de-visite is a composite of ten Native American images believed to have been made in the late 1860s and early 1870s by William S. Soule. At least some of the images were likely made in Indian Territory; some may have been made in Kansas. The featured photo in the center is of Satanta, the Kiowa chief. Starting at the top, immediately above Satanta, the remaining images are (moving clockwise): Arapaho camp; two Arapaho girls; Kiowa or Kiowa-Apache man named Asa Tongat; unidentified camp scene; Cheyenne woman; Cheyenne man; unidentified camp scene; Cheyenne or Arapaho woman; and, two unidentified young women. Two of the photos are an exact match of a known Soule image (Satanta and Arapaho camp). Two others have the same subjects as known Soule images, but depict them in a different pose (two Arapaho girls and the Cheyenne or Arapaho woman). Will Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or are deemed likely to be his work. Three of the photographs in the composite are also included in the Wilson collection as individual cartes-de-visite--Asa Tongat (Item 227905), the Cheyenne man (Item 303271), and the Cheyenne woman (Item 303272).


Die Indianer der Vereinigten Staaten

Die Indianer der Vereinigten Staaten
Creator: Hunnius, Ado, 1842-1923
Date: 1870-1900
This item contains an article on the Indians of the United States written by Carl Julius Adolph Hunnius. Known as Ado to his friends and colleagues, Hunnius was a Civil War veteran, Indian Wars veteran, artist, writer, and long time resident of Kansas. The article, printed entirely in German, contains information compiled by Hunnius on the Native American tribes in the United States. Details include the branch of the tribe (Stamm), place of residence (Wohnsitz), county, and the total number of men, women and children (Manner, Weiber, und Kinder) for each tribe. The information provided in the article was taken from the offical reports of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. The article also mentions that there were a total of 100,000 civilized Indians, 135,000 half-civilized Indians, and 81,000 "Wild" Indians.


Indian lodge at Medicine Creek, Kansas

Indian lodge at Medicine Creek, Kansas
Creator: Howland, J.
Date: October 1867
This illustration portrays Indian dwellings at Medicine Lodge Creek. In October 1867, the United States government signed peace treaties with the Kiowa, Comanche, Apache, Arapaho, and Cheyenne Indians, removing these tribes to reservations. This illustration was published in Harper's Weekly. Funds for digitization provided by Mr. Steve Peckel in memory of William Chalfant.


Indian treaties.  Peace agreed upon with the Comanches and Kiowas

Indian treaties. Peace agreed upon with the Comanches and Kiowas
Creator: New York Times Company
Date: October 25, 1867
This brief article published n the New York Times describes the treaty signed by the Comanche and Kiowa tribes at Medicine Lodge Creek, Barber County, Kansas, in 1867. According to the terms of the treaty, these tribes would relocate to Indian Territory (present-day Oklahoma) and in return they would receive provisions and annual annuity payments of $2500. The article also mentions that the treaties with other tribes, including the Cheyenne, Apache, and Arapaho, will be concluded shortly.


Kansas and Nebraska

Kansas and Nebraska
Creator: Wells, J.G.
Date: 1856
Map detailing the territories of Kansas and Nebraska and surrounding states. Identified on the map are rivers, Indian lands, the Santa Fe Trail, and the Oregon Trail. This map is provided through a co-operative project between the Lecompton Historical Society and the Kansas Historical Society. Partial funding was provided by the Ross and Margaret Wulfkuhle Charitable Trust and the Freedom's Frontier National Heritage Area. Copies of this map are available for viewing at both the Kansas Historical Society and Lecompton Historical Society.


Pacer, Kiowa-Apache chief, in Indian Territory

Pacer, Kiowa-Apache chief, in Indian Territory
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of the Kiowa-Apache chief Pacer is believed to have been made in Indian Territory in the early 1870s, either by William S. Soule or by William P. Bliss. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The photographer William P. Bliss moved from Wichita, Kansas to Indian Territory about the time Soule left. He was based first at the Cheyenne Agency at Darlington, then moved to Fort Sill. Some photographs thought to have been originally created by Soule also were marketed under the Bliss imprint. This carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale, and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the cartes-de-visite. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. The photographer who made this image cannot be identified with certainty, but it probably was either William Soule or William Bliss.


Ramona "Apache Princess"

Ramona "Apache Princess"
Date: Between 1860 and 1900
A studio portrait of Ramona "Apache Princess."


The Peace Commission. Indian talks

The Peace Commission. Indian talks
Creator: Daily Missouri Democrat (St. Louis)
Date: October 23, 1867
This article, written by a special correspondent for the Daily Missouri Democrat, describes the meeting of U. S. commissioners and Indian chiefs at Medicine Lodge Creek in 1867. The article includes a transcription of the proceedings. Before the council meeting began, Commissioner Taylor distributed gifts to the tribes who were represented, and all the U. S. delegates expressed their desire for peace. Some of the Indian delegates, particularly Chief Black Kettle of the Cheyenne, doubted the intentions of the federal government. The article also states that the commissioners looked into the causes of the war, attributing some blame to the massacre at Sand Creek in 1864.


The Peace Commission. Second session of the Grand Council

The Peace Commission. Second session of the Grand Council
Creator: Daily Missouri Democrat (St. Louis)
Date: October 28, 1867
This article, part of a series of articles published in the Daily Missouri Democrat, discusses the second session of the grand council between the U. S. government and representatives from the Arapaho, Apache, Comanche, and Kiowa tribes. The article also includes transcriptions of key speeches by Senator Henderson and Satanta, a Kiowa chief, in addition to brief comments by other representatives from both sides. A treaty between the Kiowa, Comanche, and United States was signed at the end of this meeting on October 21, 1867.


The Wichita Indians

The Wichita Indians
Creator: Pratt, Charles H
Date: November 23, 1935
This item, written by Charles H. Pratt, Historian for The Wichita Nation Association, provides a detailed glimpse into the history and traditions of the "Wichita and Affiliated Bands of Indians." Some of the information included is an explanation of the origins of the Wichita, a Spanish Conquistadors report on the Wichitas, Wichita Bands in Texas, and the names of some Wichita women.


The grand council

The grand council
Creator: Daily Missouri Democrat (St. Louis)
Date: October 25, 1867
This article, a continuation of the article published in the October 23, 1867, issue of the Democrat, discusses the grand council between the U. S. government and representatives from the Cheyenne, Arapaho, Apache, Comanche, and Kiowa Indian tribes. The article also includes transcriptions of the speeches by Senator Henderson and Satanta, a Kiowa chief, in addition to brief comments by other white and Indian representatives.


Two Apache men in Indian Territory

Two Apache men in Indian Territory
Creator: Soule, William Stinson, 1836-1908
Date: Between 1869 and 1875
This carte-de-visite of two Apache men is believed to have been made in the early 1870s by William S. Soule at Fort Sill, Indian Territory. It carries a notation identifying the men as Apache, but they more likely were Kiowa-Apache. Soule is well-known for the photographs he made of Southern Plains Indians in the late 1860s and early 1870s. He arrived at Fort Dodge in 1867, moved briefly to Camp Supply a couple of years later, then relocated to Fort Sill, where he remained until returning to Boston in late 1874 or early 1875. The carte-de-visite is one of at least fifty collected by Charles L. Wilson in the 1870s. Born in West Virginia, Wilson lived in Kansas most of his life, residing in St. George, Manhattan, Miltonvale and Topeka. Little is known about how and why he acquired the carte-de-visites. Notations on many of them suggest they were procured in Indian Territory; some notations also indicate that Wilson was a member of Company L of the Kansas Eleventh Cavalry. Because that regiment disbanded several years before the images were made, his military service was probably unrelated to acquisition of the photos. The Wilson collection is characterized by the unique style in which each carte-de-visite is mounted. The mounts obscure whatever photographer's imprint may exist on the original cards. More than one photographer is represented in the collection; however, many of the images, including this one, can either definitely be attributed to Will Soule or are deemed likely to be his work.


Showing 1 - 13

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