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People - Notable Kansans - Doy, John, b. 1812

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: February 6, 1859
Cyrus K. Holliday, soon to return to Topeka after a productive territorial legislative session in Lawrence, wrote to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He wrote about a festival held at the Eldridge House, and reported on several other incidents of note: the arrest of John W. Doy, captured by Missourians while helping former slaves travel to Iowa; John Brown's avoidance of capture by [John P.] Woods (at the Battle of the Spurs on January 31, 1859); and Charles Fischer's escape after being twice arrested as "a fugitive slave." Holliday also wrote that the legislature had passed and Governor Samuel Medary would approve a bill granting Josephine Branscomb a divorce. Despite Holliday's efforts, the constitutional convention would be held at Wyandotte in July. He had refused [Alfred L.] Winans' request for a recommendation.


Dr. John Doy's carbine

Dr. John Doy's carbine
Date: 1859
Dr. John Doy used this Sharps carbine fighting border disputes in Franklin County, Kansas Territory, and at Ft. Titus. In January 1859, Doy was captured near Lawrence by pro-slavery Missouri forces and charged with aiding in the abduction of fugitive slaves. For six months Doy was held in a St. Joseph, Missouri, jail. Doy was rescued by ten of his free-state friends, led by Major James Abbott. Engraved in the carbine's stock is the phrase, "Successful Agent of the Irrepressible Conflict."


Edmund Burke Whitman to George Luther Stearns

Edmund Burke Whitman to George Luther Stearns
Creator: Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883
Date: March 1859
Here Whitman wrote about his support on behalf of the National Kansas Committee of several activities: Dr. Doy's defense, John Brown (despite the fact that he had obtained additional funds "under false pretences"), and the organization of the Republican Party which was to be undertaken at convention in Osawatomie later that spring. Whitman feared that without some effort "the genuine standard Republicans" would fail to control the movement. He also mentioned an "unfortunate" altercation between Martin Conway and Charles Robinson on the streets of Lawrence.


Ephraim Nute to Franklin B. Sanborn

Ephraim Nute to Franklin B. Sanborn
Creator: Nute, Ephraim
Date: March 22, 1859
Ephraim Nute's efforts on behalf of "4 more fugitives," including Charley Fisher of Leavenworth, and the activities of "manhunters" in and around Lawrence are the main focus of this letter to F. B. Sanborn, but Nute also mentions the continuing need for money to pay for Doy's defense. The trial was to begin at St. Joseph the next day.


Ephraim Nute to [Unidentified recipient]

Ephraim Nute to [Unidentified recipient]
Creator: Nute, Ephraim
Date: February 14, 1859
Ephraim Nute wrote from Lawrence on February 14, 1859, regarding "the disaster that befel the last expedition from this place with fugitives." The party, led by Dr. John Doy, was in route to Oskaloosa when captured and taken to Missouri, where "the colored people, both free and slaves, have been shipped for the New Orleans market." Doy and his son had been jailed at Platte City, Missouri, and were to be tried for "stealing a slave from Weston." Nute was quite sure this operation had been betrayed from within, as "Great rewards were offered, spies sent out & men hired in this place to watch & aid in recovering the run away property."


Ephraim Nute to unidentified recipient

Ephraim Nute to unidentified recipient
Creator: Nute, Ephraim
Date: February 24, 1859
Ephaim Nute of Lawrence provides an interesting description of the plight of one of the Doy party's fugitive slaves, captured and jailed at Platte City until his escape and dangerous flight back to Lawrence. "We have him now hid & are to day making arrangements to have him set forward tomorrow 30 miles to another depot. I think they (there are 2 others to go) will not be taken again without bloodshed." Nute also mentioned his involvement in the "Charley Fisher affair in Leavenworth." Fisher, a black fugitive, had actually come to Nute's house "disguised in female attire."


Ephraim Nute to unidentified recipient [Franklin B. Sanborn?]

Ephraim Nute to unidentified recipient [Franklin B. Sanborn?]
Creator: Nute, Ephraim
Date: ca. February 1859
Ephraim Nute wrote of just receiving work that "Doct. [Samuel Gridley?] Howe" was "about to sail from New York" on account of his health; but whether or not it was restored, "he has lived already to a glorious result." Nute also mentions continued preparations for the trial of Dr. Doy, still "in that wretched Platte City jail."


Expenses of Trip for rescuing Dr. Doy

Expenses of Trip for rescuing Dr. Doy
Date: July 23, 1859
An accounting of the expenses (including supplies and cash advances) incurred in the rescue of Dr. John Doy, who had been arrested by Missouri authorities on January 25, 1859, for abducting slaves. Doy was freed from his cell in a St. Joseph, Missouri, jail on July 23, 1859, by a rescue party that included James Abbott.


John Doy and rescue party

John Doy and rescue party
Creator: DaLee, Amon Gilbert
Date: 1859
This black and white photograph shows John Doy and his rescue party. On January 25, 1859, Dr. John Doy and his son, Charles, left Lawrence, Kansas Territory for Nebraska with thirteen slaves. They were captured twelve miles outside of Lawrence and were taken to Weston, Missouri. The Doys were arraigned at Weston and were committed to jail at Platte City, Missouri, for the crime of abducting slaves. They remained in jail until March 20, 1859, when they were taken to St. Joseph, Missouri, where Dr. Doy was tried. After the trial, his son, Charles, was set free. The jury however could not agree on a verdict for Dr. Doy and he was tried a second time. At the second trial, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. While being held in the St. Joseph jail, Doy was freed by friends from Kansas Territory on July 23, 1859. People in the photograph are: (l to r) Major James B. Abbott, Captain Joshua A. Pike, Jacob Senix, Joseph Gardner, Thomas Simmons, S. J. Willis, Captain John E. Stuart [Stewart], Charles Doy, Silas Soule, George R. Hay and Dr. John Doy (seated in front). The photograph was taken at Lawrence, Kansas Territory, in the summer of 1859.


John Doy and rescue party

John Doy and rescue party
Creator: DaLee, Amon Gilbert
Date: 1859
On January 25, 1859, free state activists Dr. John Doy and his son, Charles, left Lawrence, Kansas Territory, for Nebraska with 13 slaves. They were captured when only twelve miles out of Lawrence, and were taken to Weston, Missouri. The two Doys had an examination at Weston and were committed to jail at Platte City, Missouri, for the crime of abducting slaves. They remained in jail until March 20, 1859, then moved to St. Joseph, Missouri, where Dr. Doy was tried. After the trial, Charles Doy was set free. However, the first jury could not agree on a verdict for Dr. Doy, and he was tried a second time. At the second trial, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. While being held in the St. Joseph jail, he was freed by friends from Kansas Territory on July 23, 1859. People in the ambrotype are: (l to r) Major James B. Abbott, Captain Joshua A. Pike, Jacob Senix, Joseph Gardner, Thomas Simmons, S. J. Willis, Captain John E. Stuart [Stewart], Charles Doy, Silas Soule, George R. Hay, and Dr. John Doy (seated in front). The ambrotype was taken at Lawrence, Kansas Territory, in the summer of 1859.


John Doy and rescue party

John Doy and rescue party
Creator: DaLee, Amon Gilbert
Date: 1859
This ambrotype shows John Doy and his rescue party. On January 25, 1859, Dr. John Doy and his son, Charles, left Lawrence, Kansas Territory, for Nebraska with thirteen slaves. They were captured twelve miles outside of Lawrence and were taken to Weston, Missouri. The two Doys were arraigned at Weston and were committed to jail at Platte City, Missouri, for the crime of abducting slaves. They remained in jail until March 20, 1859, when they were taken to St. Joseph, Missouri, where Dr. Doy was tried. After the trial, his son, Charles, was set free. The jury could not agree on a verdict for Dr. Doy, however, and he was tried a second time. At the second trial, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. While being held in the St. Joseph jail, Doy was freed by friends from Kansas Territory on July 23, 1859. People in the ambrotype are: (l to r) Major James B. Abbott, Captain Joshua A. Pike, Jacob Senix, Joseph Gardner, Thomas Simmons, S. J. Willis, Charles Doy, Captain John E. Stuart [Stewart], Silas Soule, George R. Hay and Dr. John Doy (seated in front). The ambrotype was taken at Lawrence, Kansas Territory, in the summer of 1859.


John Doy to Strong

John Doy to Strong
Creator: Doy, John, b. 1812
Date: October 19, 1854
John Doy, writing from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to a Mr. Strong, described an incident in which a Westport, Missouri, man charged him extra money for notary services because he "was a Yankee."


John Doy to Thomas W. Higginson

John Doy to Thomas W. Higginson
Creator: Doy, John, b. 1812
Date: February 24, 1857
John Doy writes from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Reverend Thomas W. Higginson of Worcester, Massachusetts, relating the struggles of Doy's family and other matters of interest in the Kansas Territory. Doy writes that he had to sell the last of his corn crop and his pig just to make ends meet during the winter. He also briefly mentions the Central Committee, stating that he did not ask them for relief funds or provisions, because recently they had acted improperly towards some ladies. He also informs Higginson of an altercation at Lecompton, Kansas Territory, where Missourians shot a storekeeper named Mr. Shepard, and "Sherrard their Bully late of Virginia was shot and died in a day or two." In addition, Doy comments on the "bogus officers" and their work in the territory.


Joshua A. Pike

Joshua A. Pike
Date: Between 1856 and 1865
A portrait of Joshua A. Pike, who was a member of the Doy rescue party and was part of a plot to rescue John Brown after the raid on Harpers Ferry.


Samuel F. Tappan to Thomas W. Higginson

Samuel F. Tappan to Thomas W. Higginson
Creator: Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913
Date: June 27, 1859
The main focus of this letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by Samuel F. Tappan, is the case of Dr. John Doy, who had just been convicted of abducting slaves from Missouri. Doy had been sentenced to five years imprisonment, but his lawyers got a two month suspension so they could file an appeal with the state Supreme Court. Tappan outlines the evidence against Doy, which he said rested on the testimony of one proslavery man. He reiterates the story behind the Doy kidnapping in case the recipient, Reverend Thomas W. Higginson, is not aware of all the details. The letter ends by mentioning the strength of the Democratic Party in Kansas Territory.


Showing 1 - 15

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