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Affidavits concerning William and Henry Sherman, and Allen Wilkinson

Affidavits concerning William and Henry Sherman, and Allen Wilkinson
Creator: Grant, John T.
Date: June 12, 1856
This document contains brief affidavit statements made by several free state supporters of the character and personal habits of William and Henry Sherman, and Allen Wilkinson, who were described as "intemperate" men. William Sherman and Allen Wilkinson were among the five pro-slavery settlers killed in the Pottawatomie Massacre in May, 1856. The document is written in the same hand (suggesting that its statements were either recorded or copied by the same person), and is identified as "Potawatomie, Franklin County, Kansas Territory, June 12, 1856."


Annual Report to the American Missionary Association

Annual Report to the American Missionary Association
Creator: Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898
Date: 1858
This draft report, written by Samuel L. Adair, covers the year 1857 and also describes the organization of the Congregational Church in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Samuel L. Adair was preaching at a number of rural churches in the area. It reports on membership, attendance, and other religious activities. He also mentions the activities of other denominations in the area.


Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair

Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Darrach, Barstow
Date: June 8, 1857
Dr. Barstow Darrach, writing from the New York Hospital, wrote Adair in great detail about his opinions of Kansas Territory's Governor Robert J. Walker and other political happenings in Kansas Territory.


Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair

Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Darrach, Barstow
Date: April 20, 1857
Barstow Darrach, a doctor at New York Hospital, wrote Adair that he was encouraged by the results of the recent Leavenworth election, and that he had authorized a Mr. Tator to settle his affairs in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Darrach also discussed the slave oligarchy and indications that St. Louis was opposed to slavery. He cited several events that he felt indicated the free state cause was progressing.


Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair

Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Darrach, Barstow
Date: January 8, 1857
Dr. Barstow Darrach wrote to comment upon recent events at the national level and the prospect of little support for the free state cause from either Congress or President Buchanan. He reported that John Brown was in New York speaking about Kansas, and that Brown was trying to raise some funds and other support for the free state cause.


Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair

Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Darrach, Barstow
Date: November 27, 1856
Dr. Barstow Darrach had returned to New York Hospital after being in Kansas Territory. He wrote that he felt the prospects were not very favorable for Kansas Territory. He had found "some warm friends disposed to yield Kansas to the slave power rather than resort to a revolution," and he believed [President] Buchanan would only pretend to support freedom "until the south can make sure of their prize." Darrach felt it would take a large emigration of settlers to Kansas to make it a free state, and that free state settlers would be thwarted by the "bogus authority" and "another mob from Mo." should the Free State party appear at the polls. He stated that "the strongest argument [against success] that I see is that the people do not seem prepared." He wrote that he would ship clothing, flannel cloth, and blankets to Adair by way of W. F. M. Arny in Chicago.


Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair

Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Darrach, Barstow
Date: December 17, 1856
Dr. Barstow Darrach writes from the New York Hospital to comment on published reports that implied the prospects for Kansas Territory becoming a free state were improving. Darrach shares his thoughts on Republicans and Democrats at the national level and also on the possible reactions of southerners. Darrach asks for news of the petition to free Andrew Reeder and the recent Osawatomie arrests. He describes his personal plans that will prevent him from returning to Kansas Territory for at least two years.


C. G. Dick to Samuel L. Adair

C. G. Dick to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Dick, Campbell Graham
Date: April 21, 1857
Campbell G. Dick was Reverend Adair's brother-in-law, and wrote from his home in Marshall, Highland County, Ohio, that he supported the American Missionary Association as it promoted Christianity, but was pessimistic about the chances for Kansas Territory entering the Union as a free state. He wrote that the Democratic party was controlled by the south, and asked Adair to inform him if free state men intended to vote in the elections called by the "Bogus Legislature."


Correspondence between Samuel Lyle Adair, Florella Brown Adair, and their children

Correspondence between Samuel Lyle Adair, Florella Brown Adair, and their children
Date: 1860-1862
Correspondence between Samuel Lyle Adair, his wife Florella Brown Adair, and their children, Charles, Emma, and Addie. Florella was the half- sister of abolitionist John Brown and Samuel was a minister and established the First Congregational Church of Osawatomie. Their cabin was a station on the Underground Railroad and John Brown's headquarters.


D. R. Barker to Samuel L. Adair

D. R. Barker to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Barker, D. R.
Date: February 16, 1857
Writing from Mercer, Pennsylvania, Barker, a former classmate of Adair's at Oberlin College, commented on the political situation in regard to Kansas Territory and pro-slavery forces, including pro-slavery churches.


E. B. Whitman to Samuel L. Adair

E. B. Whitman to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883
Date: May 15, 1857
E. B. Whitman, located in Lawrence, was the general agent for the National Kansas Committee that was distributing relief supplies in Kansas Territory. He writes that he is sending Adair potatoes and corn to be distributed for planting. Evidently, Adair had written him previously about some boxes of supplies he expected, and Whitman speculates that some boxes might be on the steamer "Light Foot" on the Kansas River in Wyandotte, Kansas Territory, and some might be in St. Louis, Missouri.


E. L. Partridge to Samuel L. Adair

E. L. Partridge to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Partridge, E. L. (Mrs. William)
Date: December 28, 1856
Mrs. E. L. Partridge writes Samuel L. Adair to report upon the condition of her husband, William, who is a prisoner in Tecumseh, Kansas Territory. Mr. Partridge was one of the free state men arrested after the May 1856 Pottawatomie Massacre of five pro-slavery settlers. Mrs. Partridge describes her husband's health and his prospects for being released.


Edmund Burke Whitman to Samuel L. Adair

Edmund Burke Whitman to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883
Date: October 5, 1857
Whitman writes from (presumably) Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to ask Samuel Adair for his assistance in distributing remaining relief clothing before winter. He includes instructions for notifying the public of the availability of relief goods and indicates that whomever Adair "knows to be in absolute want" should have first priority. Whitman feels the task of distribution would not take longer than one week. He also wants Adair to estimate the number of poor families in his [Adair's] community.


G. S. Lewis to Samuel L. Adair

G. S. Lewis to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Lewis, G. S.
Date: December 12, 1856
G. S. Lewis,a friend of Samuel Adair, writes from Albany in Athens County, Ohio. Lewis was concerned about the safety of the Adair family, and commented on the trials they must be suffering. He comments on the bravery of Charley, the Adair's son who helped warn Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, of the coming of proslavery forces prior to the Battle of Osawatomie. Lewis also comments on John Brown, Gov. Geary, John Freemont, and the political situation in Kansas Territory and nationally. He shares rumors of slave insurrections in Kentucky and Tennessee.


G. U. Parsons, Minister, and Benj. R. Edmonds, Clerk of Congregational Society, to the Committee on Church Extension of the General Association

G. U. Parsons, Minister, and Benj. R. Edmonds, Clerk of Congregational Society, to the Committee on Church Extension of the General Association
Creator: Parsons, G. U.
Date: March 19, 1858
Writing from Ogden, Kansas Territory, the authors state that they have been voted an appropriation by the Congregational Union of New York to build a church but that they had not received any of the money. However, their numbers have increased, and they have received subscriptions to begin work. They need additional money to finish the building and are requesting $200 from the committee. They describe the advantages of Ogden being where the Smoky Hill and Republican rivers flowed into the Kansas, near Fort Riley, and with prospects for a railroad.


Gamaliel Garrison to Samuel L. Adair

Gamaliel Garrison to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Garrison, Gamaliel
Date: Probably December 15, 1856
Gamaliel Garrison is writing to his nephew, Samuel L. Adair, from Yellow Springs, Ohio, after returning from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. He writes of the death of his son, David Garrison, and of Frederick Brown, both killed during the Battle of Osawatomie. Garrison indicates that he had expected all his sons to settle in Kansas and that David's wife, Rachel, still speaks well of the country. He hopes that it would be possible to hold on to David's claim for his heirs. The sheet of paper also contains a letter from James Garrison. (See item #90509.)


H. H. Williams, and others, to Samuel L. Adair

H. H. Williams, and others, to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Williams, Henry H.
Date: June 14, 1856
H. H. Williams writes from Tecumseh, Kansas Territory, where he was imprisoned along with seven other suspects in the Pottawatomie massacre, to inform Rev. Samuel Adair of their situation. The letter is also signed by the seven other prisoners--William Partridge, Jason Brown, S. W. Kilbourne, John Brown Jr., S. B. Morse, Jacob Benjamin, and P. D. Maness. He indicates that they were charged with high treason. He also reported on John Brown, Jr.'s health. Williams asked Adair to try to raise some funds for their legal defense as they had hired a lawyer.


H. J. Williams to Florella Brown Adair

H. J. Williams to Florella Brown Adair
Creator: Williams, H. J. (Mrs. John)
Date: October 29, 1856
Mrs. Williams had been a member of one of Rev. Samuel L. Adair's churches in Lafayette, Ohio. She writes Mrs. Adair about her concern for the Adair family during all of the troubles in Kansas Territory. She and her husband also sent some cheese and cloth to the Adairs. The letter has references to various family members and demonstrates the support women settlers in Kansas Territory received from friends in the East.


H. J. Williams to Florella Brown Adair

H. J. Williams to Florella Brown Adair
Creator: Williams, H. J. (Mrs. John)
Date: January 27, 1857
H. J. (Mrs. John) Williams writes to express her sympathy for the conditions Mrs. Adair has to endure in Kansas Territory and eloquently describes what suffering she felt Mrs. Adair has experienced. Mrs. Williams indicates that boxes of materials have been sent to Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, and expresseds her fears they have not arrived. The letter provides news of the Williams family and others in Lafayette, Ohio.


Harvey Jones to Samuel L. Adair

Harvey Jones to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Jones, Harvey
Date: December 14, 1859
Jones, a Congregational minister who lived in Wabaunsee, Kansas Territory, wrote to Samuel L. Adair after John Brown's attack at Harpers Ferry, Virginia. Jones asked Adair to write to him about John Brown's character, and to indicate whether Brown was associated with a church.


James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair

James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Garrison, James
Date: December 15, 1856
James Garrison writes from Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, to his cousin Samuel Adair in Kansas Territory. The letter discusses relief efforts on behalf of the free state settlers and concerns about fraud on the part of agents collecting money and goods. Garrison writes that the Cincinnati Gazette had published a long list of names of Kansas citizens who had been refused clothing by the relief society. He feels an explanation to the public was needed if the relief efforts were to be continued. The letterhead included an engraving of Antioch College. The sheet of paper also contained a letter from Gamaliel Garrison. (See item #90260.)


James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair

James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Garrison, James
Date: February 27, 1857
James Garrison write his cousin, Samuel L. Adair, about the prospects for Kansas Territory and about being harassed by ruffians. Garrison states his belief that only a large migration of free state supporters to Kansas in the spring would prevent it from becoming a slave state and describes pro-slavery plans to prevent emigration to Kansas.


James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair

James Garrison to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Garrison, James
Date: December 29, 1856
James Garrison writes to his cousin, Samuel L. Adair, that he has collected $104.75 to be used for relief in Kansas. Garrison is concerned about how to get the money to Adair and suggests that, if Adair has been able to collect on the sale of Rachel Garrison's goods, Adair should use that money instead. He asks Adair to write a letter of acknowledgement to the "Free Presbyterian" published in Yellow Springs, Ohio.


James P. Root to S. Y. Lum

James P. Root to S. Y. Lum
Creator: Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898
Date: March 19, 1858
Mr. James Root writes from Wyandotte, Kansas Territory, about the possibility of providing support to organize a Congregational Church in that city. He explains that a number of denominations had organized, but they have a small number of members and no buildings. A Congregational ministernamed Mr. Storrs has been dividing his time between Quindaro and Wyandotte but is going to focus on Quindaro in the future. He asks for whatever support was possible.


Jason Brown to Samuel L. Adair

Jason Brown to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Brown, Jason
Date: April 4, 1859
Jason Brown writes to Samuel L. Adair from Akron, Ohio, in response, evidently, to an earlier letter Adair had written him concerning placing a claim for property lost while in Kansas Territory. Brown writes that he didn't think any radical anti-slavery supporters would receive any funds from Congress in the near future. He believes that if he had been on the pro-slavery side, his claim would have been paid. He asks Adair to check his young son's (A. Brown) grave in the Lawrence cemetery to ensure that T. L. Whitney had built a picket fence around it, as he'd requested, and to pay Whitney if it had been done (or that Adair would have it done and Brown would reimburse Adair).


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