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People - Notable Kansans - Murdock, Marshall Marcellus, 1837-1908

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Daily eagle

Daily eagle
Creator: Murdock, Marshall Marcellus, 1837-1908
Date: May 20, 1884-June 7, 1884
View and search this newspaper by clicking on the Chronicling America link below. This newspaper comes from the collections of the Kansas Historical Society and was digitized with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program. Established as the first daily newspaper in Wichita to carry the Eagle name, the Daily Eagle printed four pages of news each day except Monday beginning on May 20, 1884. The Daily Eagle boasted of having "the largest circulation of any daily paper in southwestern Kansas." Although the Daily Eagle only produced a mere 17 issues, its name remains synonymous with its successors, as well as with the city itself. On June 8, 1884, the Daily Eagle became the Wichita Daily Eagle.


History of Kansas newspapers

History of Kansas newspapers
Creator: Kansas State Historical Society. Department of Archives
Date: 1916
The subtitle of this publication is "A History of the Newspapers and Magazines Published in Kansas From the Organization of Kansas Territory, 1854, to January 1, 1916." This history includes biographical sketches and some portraits of prominent editors. The bulk of the book contains listings of all of the newspapers published in the state, organized by county and then towns within that county. This listing begins on page 137. Newspapers that were being published in 1916 include the name of the editor/publisher, the frequency, how long it had been published, and notes about any predecessor papers. The information for each county also includes a list of all discontinued newspapers from that county. Each county listing begins with the date it was organized, the origin of the name, and some basic statistics. This volume is an excellent source on the early newspaper history of Kansas. A detailed index begins on page 323. The Kansas State Historical Society was founded by Kansas newspaper editors and its newspaper holdings represent an almost comprehensive collection of the newspapers published in all parts of Kansas, most of which are available on microfilm through interlibrary loan.


Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence

Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1864
This is correspondence sent and received by the Kansas Adjutant General's Office. Cyrus K. Holliday succeeded Guilford Dudley as Adjutant General in May 1864. Topics of this correspondence include hospital reports from Fort Scott, requests for more appointments of medical officers, transmittal of muster rolls, a list of volunteers from Wisconsin who enlisted in Kansas, and letters from Elizabeth Pearsons Clouse inquiring about her son, Benjamin Franklin Pearsons. Correspondence was frequently exchanged with Lieutenant J.R. Kemble, General John B. Gray, Assistant Provost Marshal Sidney Clarke, Provost Marshal James McCahon, and Provost Marshal A.J. Shannon. Also included are letters from newspaper publishers requesting payment for printing General and Special Orders, including a young Marshall M. Murdock from the Burlingame Chronicle. A letter dated January 31, 1864 from President Abraham Lincoln orders the draft of 500,000 men. A searchable, full-text version of this correspondence is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Marshall Marcellus Murdock

Marshall Marcellus Murdock
Date: Between 1870 and 1879
Portrait of Marshall Marcellus Murdock, 1837-1908, a newspaperman, founder of the Wichita Eagle, and State Senator.


State of Kansas v. State of Colorado :  abstract of complainant's testimony

State of Kansas v. State of Colorado : abstract of complainant's testimony
Creator: Kansas. Office of the Attorney General
Date: August 15 - September 21, 1904
A summary of testimony given by Kansas residents in the State of Kansas v. State of Colorado U.S. Supreme Court case. The court case centered upon Kansas' claim that Colorado irrigators were using more than their fair share of water from the Arkansas River. In their testimony, numerous Kansans commented on the decline in the flow of the Arkansas River between 1870 and 1900. In 1907, the court decided the case in Colorado's favor, refusing to order Colorado to restrict its use of Arkansas River water. However, the court left open the possibility that at some point in the future the economic damage caused to Kansas by Colorado's use of the river might give Kansas the right to relief. Under this doctrine of "equitable apportionment" of economic benefits from water resources, Kansas sued Colorado in 1943. This suit led to the negotiation of the Arkansas River Compact which was approved by Congress in 1949. Kansas sued Colorado again in 1986 claiming that Colorado violated the terms of the compact. The court ruled in Kansas' favor.


Wichita city eagle

Wichita city eagle
Creator: Murdock, Marshall Marcellus, 1837-1908
Date: April 12, 1872-April 12, 1883
View and search this newspaper by clicking on the Chronicling America link below. This newspaper comes from the collections of the Kansas Historical Society and was digitized with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program. In 1872, the Wichita City Eagle debuted as the dominant newspaper of south-central Kansas and a pioneer newspaper of the state. The first issue of what would later become widely known as the Eagle was published on April 12, 1872. The Wichita City Eagle changed its name to simply the Wichita Eagle beginning April 19, 1883.


Wichita daily eagle

Wichita daily eagle
Creator: Murdock, Marshall Marcellus, 1837-1908
Date: March 18, 1890-May 30, 1904
View and search this newspaper by clicking on the Chronicling America link below. This newspaper comes from the collections of the Kansas Historical Society and was digitized with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program. Subscribers received the first issue of the Wichita Daily Eagle on March 18, 1890. The paper was published daily, except Mondays, until June 9, 1906. The successor to a number of similarly named newspapers under the same proprietorship, the Wichita Daily Eagle covered the arrival of Carry A. Nation, the rise of Populism, and other important events in Kansas history.


Wichita daily eagle

Wichita daily eagle
Creator: Murdock, Marshall Marcellus, 1837-1908
Date: June 8, 1884-August 17, 1886
View and search this newspaper by clicking on the Chronicling America link below. This newspaper comes from the collections of the Kansas Historical Society and was digitized with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program. After changing its name from the Daily Eagle, editor Marshall M. Murdock published the Wichita Daily Eagle for the first time on June 8, 1884. View and search this newspaper by clicking on the Chronicling America link below. From its first issue, the Wichita Daily Eagle embraced some of the latest formatting changes in the newspaper industry, explaining that "such a thing is unprecedented in American journalism - a border town with a nine-column daily." It claimed to be the first newspaper ever to be "printed on a power press in this valley and its presses the first to run by steam." On August 18, 1886, the title reverted to the Wichita Eagle, although its editors, affiliation, and audience remained unchanged. These early renditions of the Eagle paved the way for numerous successors, including the Wichita Eagle we know and read today.


Wichita eagle

Wichita eagle
Creator: Murdock, Marshall Marcellus, 1837-1908
Date: April 19, 1883-November 27, 1885
View and search this newspaper by clicking on the Chronicling America link below. This newspaper comes from the collections of the Kansas Historical Society and was digitized with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program. On April 19, 1883, the Wichita City Eagle, the dominant newspaper of south-central Kansas, changed its name to the Wichita Eagle, which, like its predecessor, was a Republican-affiliated weekly newspaper. As publisher, Marshall M. Murdock, commonly remembered as "Marsh," expressed to the newspaper's readers that "the ambition of its founder is, and will be, to make [the Eagle] the leading journal of the Great Southwest." On January 27, 1888, the Eagle changed names again to the Wichita Weekly Eagle to help differentiate it from its daily counterparts.


Wichita eagle

Wichita eagle
Creator: Murdock, Marshall Marcellus, 1837-1908
Date: August 18, 1886-March 16, 1890
View and search this newspaper by clicking on the Chronicling America link below. This newspaper comes from the collections of the Kansas Historical Society and was digitized with funds from the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of the National Digital Newspaper Program. The Wichita Eagle was a daily newspaper, published everyday except Mondays, from August 18, 1886 until March 16, 1890. Marshall M. Murdock (1837-1908), a man recognized for his progressive ideas, worked as the editor and publisher. He established the Wichita City Eagle in 1872 and remained with the paper through all its title changes until his retirement in 1906. Murdock believed a strong daily newspaper supporting local and regional commercial interests would help Wichita "not only to be the city of this greatest of great valleys, but possibly, even probably, the city of the State of Kansas."


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