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Amos A. Lawrence to Charles Robinson

Amos A. Lawrence to Charles Robinson
Creator: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: January 31, 1856
Amos Lawrence writes from Boston, Massachusetts, to advise his friend, Charles Robinson, to submit to the authority of recognized officers of the U.S. government, no matter how unjust their actions appeared. Lawrence suggests that Robinson follow the "Fabian policy" of non-violent, peaceful resistance, and do what he could to discourage "all aggression" on the part of free-state men.


Amos A. Lawrence to Charles Robinson

Amos A. Lawrence to Charles Robinson
Creator: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: March 5, 1858
Lawrence writes from Boston, Massachusetts, on March 5, 1858, to introduce W. D. Goddard, "an ardent free state man" who wished "to live and die in Kansas."


Amos A. Lawrence to Charles Robinson

Amos A. Lawrence to Charles Robinson
Creator: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: October 19, 1858
Amos A. Lawrence, the benefactor of the city of Lawrence and much free-state activity generally, writes Robinson from Boston, Massachusetts, about several issues, including the establishment of a college, and business/financial matters. Lawrence made interesting reference to his own candidacy for governor on the American Party ticket. He did not expect to win, but instead proposed to simply be working to keep the "Americans" in line for a unified opposition to the Democrats in 1860.


Amos A. Lawrence to Sara Robinson

Amos A. Lawrence to Sara Robinson
Creator: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: June 26, 1856
Amos A. Lawrence writes from New York to state that he believes "Gov. Robinson cannot be harmed by any action of law," but thinks it wise for Sara T. D. Robinson to write a letter to Lawrence's mother "to be kept in reserve." Lawrence included a draft version of that letter but it has not been digitized. Lawrence mentions visits with Congressmen William Howard and John Sherman (Howard Commission) and testimony before a congressional committee. He seems optimistic about the situation in Kansas. [Reprinted in Blackmar, "Life of Charles Robinson," 434.]


Andrew H. Reeder to Charles Robinson

Andrew H. Reeder to Charles Robinson
Creator: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: February 16, 1856
From "Washington City" on February 16, 1856, former Kansas Territory governor Andrew H. Reeder wrote Charles Robinson regarding Reeder's efforts to influence Kansas Territory policy in the nation's capital. Reeder was working through friends, since he no longer had personal influence with President Pierce, and he was not pleased with the president's February 11 proclamation, which he called "the low contemptible trickstering affair which might expected from Pierce, and is like the Special Message [of January 24] a slander on the Free State Party." Nevertheless, Reeder thought it could have been worse and insisted that Robinson and the other free-state leaders "should not organize the State Govt" as Pierce would just use that action to justify aggressive moves to suppress the free state movement.


Andrew H. Reeder to Charles Robinson

Andrew H. Reeder to Charles Robinson
Creator: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: February 18, 1856
On February 18, 1856, former Kansas Territorial governor, Andrew Reeder, writes Charles Robinson to advise Robinson of the current situation in Washington, D.C., and to urge caution. Reeder believes that Robinson, and the Topeka movement and legislature, must clearly state that they are organizing a "state government" solely for the purpose of being ready to assume authority if and when Congress admits Kansas Territory to the Union. Reeder believes the "state movement" was on solid constitutional ground if this is its official position in the meantime, and cautions Robinson that they must take care not to usurp the power and authority of the territorial government.


Charles Robinson's speech welcoming William Seward

Charles Robinson's speech welcoming William Seward
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 26, 1860
This is a handwritten copy of Charles Robinson's September 26, 1860, speech welcoming William H. Seward to Lawrence, Kansas Territory. It contains some additional comments by Robinson to the friends to whom he is sending this copy.


Charles Robinson account book

Charles Robinson account book
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: December 1856 - April 1857
This cloth bound journal is identified as "Dr. Charles Robinson Account Book, 1856-1866." It contains only territorial entries for the years of 1856 and 1857. These entries include the following: S. W. Simpson to Joel Walker draft to purchase land for $500 and notes receivable to sell livestock to Thaddeus Hyatt . The understanding being that Hyatt shall not receive his certificate for shares note until he has placed upon the Kaw River a steamboat of 40 tons buthen,valued at $5000., and suitable to navigate that river.


Charles Robinson and James M. Winchell to William H. Seward

Charles Robinson and James M. Winchell to William H. Seward
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 28, 1860
A letter written by Charles Robinson and James M. Winchell to William H. Seward asking for relief for the people in Kansas Territory. They are requesting money at a reasonable interest rate. Robinson and Winchell report that the farmers were unable to pay their debts because crops were ruined by a drought. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Charles Robinson to A. Guthrie, Esq

Charles Robinson to A. Guthrie, Esq
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: December 05, 1855
A letter written by Charles Robinson and George W. Deitzler to A. Guthrie asking for help in defending Kansas Territory from Missouri insurgents. He tells Guthrie that 350 armed men from Missouri are encamped at Lecompton and Wakarusa. Robinson states that he has sent messages to all parts of the territory, the northern states and the President of the United States asking for assistance. He writes that war is inevitable. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Charles Robinson to Emma Millard

Charles Robinson to Emma Millard
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: March 30, 1860
In response to Millard's letter of March 22, Robinson writes from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, that he is "gratified" to learn of her interest in Kansas history, and that she is "disposed to examine for yourself the random thrusts of the press." Robinson makes some interesting observations regarding his interpretation of Kansas events and the importance of the various factions--free state and proslavery.


Charles Robinson to George R. Morton

Charles Robinson to George R. Morton
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: March 9, 1859
In this typed "transcript" of a letter from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, dated March 9, 1859, Charles Robinson confirmed Morton's apparent conclusion that Robinson preferred Governor Salmon P. Chase for president in 1860. Robinson considered Chase "the purest & best Statesman in the country," and thought he was "more available than any other man of whatever shade of political faith," including William Seward. Robinson also comments on the Kansas scene which was "badly cursed with the most unscrupulous demagogues that ever afflicted any people, & there is at present but little union of effort or harmony of action among the free State men."


Charles Robinson to Henry Wilson

Charles Robinson to Henry Wilson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: May 12, 1858
This important document is reportedly a copy of a letter from Charles Robinson, Lawrence, May 12, 1858, to Massachusetts Senator Henry Wilson in which the Kansas governor expresses confidence that the Lecompton Constitution will be overwhelmingly defeated in the upcoming election and makes numerous observations about the state of politics--present and future--in Kansas. Robinson believes that half the Democrats would oppose the Lecompton instrument because they knew that freestaters would dominate any state government that would be admitted under it and subsequently "the Constitution would be changed in the 'twinkling of an eye.'" Thus, he predicts no Kansas admission until at least December, 1859, and in the meantime expects Democrats to "take the lead in aiding in developing the resources of Kansas, & [the Democratic Party] will claim to be the special friends of our infant State."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 25, 1860
A letter written by Charles Robinson, from Boston, Massachusetts, to his wife, Sara Tappan Doolittle Robinson. He writes about attending Octoroon, a play about slavery, and his feelings for the "infernal institution of slavery." Robinson thinks the play conveys a true picture of conditions in the South. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 27, 1857
A letter written by Charles Robinson, from Rolmer depot near Boston, Massachusetts, to his wife, Sara Tappan Doolittle Robinson. A portion of the first page has been removed. The letter contains family and personal information. At one point in the letter, he asks for her forgiveness while he works to secure a free state for Kansas. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 22, 1861
A letter written by Charles Robinson, from St. Louis, Missouri, to his wife, Sara Tappan Doolittle Robinson. He writes about General Fremont taking to the field against Jackson, Price, and company. Because General Fremont is in the field, Robinson reports that he cannot leave and travel home. Also, he writes about looking for clothing for the Kansas regiments to protect them from the cold weather. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: May 15, 1860
A letter written by Charles Robinson, from Washington, D.C., to his wife, Sara Tappan Doolittle Robinson. He declares that Kansas will be admitted within a couple of weeks. Robinson mentions that Douglas made a powerful speech in the Senate annihilating Jefferson Davis. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 29, 1856
Writing from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Charles Robinson writes to his wife, Sara Robinson, who was traveling East via Chicago, Illinois. After kidding her about how well-known she was becoming, he comments unfavorably on Governor John W. Geary, who "thinks he is awful smart & is getting rediculous fast." Robinson also mentions the forthcoming legislative election (October 6, 1856)--"We shall not vote."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: October 1, 1857
This is another personal letter from a tired and somewhat discouraged Charles Robinson in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Sara, who is apparently about ready to rejoin her husband in Lawrence, as he discusses meeting her in St. Louis. Robinson made reference to business affairs, including those in Quindaro, and curiously suggests that he was "about ready to go with Mr. Grover to South America" because he was "getting sick of this turmoil & strife."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: July 4, 1859
From Quindaro, Kansas Territory, Charles Robinson wrote to inform his wife, Sara, about matters of business pertaining to this young city on the Kaw River. He believed "railroad matters look[ed] very well for Quindaro," for example. Robinson also takes this opportunity to scold his wife about her attitude toward the people of Lawrence, some of whom she apparently thought were 'aristocratic or exclusive but I know of no one more exclusive than yourself; I do not know whether from pride of Character or circumstance or something else."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 7, 1857
Charles Robinson, in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, writes this very personal letter to his wife, Sara Robinson, who was visiting family and friends back East. It briefly mentions the Quindaro land company business that was occupying some of Robinson's time and the fact that "political matters are comparatively quiet." Mainly, the "governor" just misses his wife and urges her to write soon and often.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 20, 1860
Charles Robinson wrote several letters to his wife, Sara Robinson in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, as he traveled East in January, 1860. From the Astor House in New York, he writes on January 20th that Congress was not yet in session, and that everyone expects the Democrats to oppose Kansas admission. It is possible that Robinson could "be sent for as a witness in Harpers Ferry affair" (Congressional investigation/hearings).


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 11, 1861
From Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Robinson writes his wife Sara, who was still in the East, concerning Jim Lane's efforts to destroy Robinson's influence. The governor is not too worried, however, and writes that he could "by paying a little attention to the matter make him smell worse than ever. He and his friends are already beginning to falter in their course for fear that I will turn the tables on them which I can do with ease."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 13, 1857
This very personal letter from Charles Robinson in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Sara, who was visiting back East, touches on a number of things such as "keeping house on the hill," business and financial interests, and being "tired" of the turmoil in Kansas Territory. It also expresses a husband's longing for his wife to return.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 26, 1857
Charles Robinson wrote this letter to his wife, Sara, upon his return to Lawrence, Kansas Territory, from "a tour of ten days into the southern part of the Territory." This was a political trip, and he had been involved in another political meeting the previous night, but Robinson expressed his wish that he "was fairly clear of political affairs, but do not see how I can get out of them at present." He also mentioned the forthcoming legislative election (October, 1857) which he believed would be okay "unless there are great frauds."


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