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Aaron Dwight Stevens

Aaron Dwight Stevens
Creator: Hinton, Richard J. (Richard Josiah), 1830-1901
Date: 1856
A pen sketch of Aaron Dwight Stevens, 1831-1860, published in Richard Hinton's book, "John Brown and His Men." Stevens, reported to be one of abolitionist John Brown's bravest men, used the alias Captain Charles Whipple while following Brown. Stevens was convicted of treason and conspiring with slaves for his part in Brown's October 16, 1859 raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia, and was hung at Charles Town, Virginia on March 16, 1860.


Aaron Dwight Stevens

Aaron Dwight Stevens
Creator: Moore, J. S.
Date: 1856
A cabinet card of Aaron Dwight Stevens, 1831-1860. Stevens, reported to be one of abolitionist John Brown's bravest men, used the alias Captain Charles Whipple while following Brown. Stevens was convicted of treason and conspiring with slaves for his part in Brown's October 16, 1859 raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia, and was hung at Charles Town, Virginia on March 16, 1860.


Aaron Dwight Stevens

Aaron Dwight Stevens
Creator: Reader, Samuel James, 1836-1914
Date: 1856
A cyanotype of Aaron Dwight Stevens, 1831-1860, from a drawing made by Samuel J. Reader of Shawnee County, Kansas Territory. Stevens, reported to be one of abolitionist John Brown's bravest men, used the alias Captain Charles Whipple while following Brown. Stevens was convicted of treason and conspiring with slaves for his part in Brown's October 16, 1859 raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia, and was hung at Charles Town, Virginia on March 16, 1860.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1911 and 1912
This postcard shows a group of men dismantling the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: 1900
This black and white photograph, copied from the Album Souvenir Letter: Osawatomie, Kansas by Jones Studio, shows the Adair-Brown cabin and an insert of the 1877 Soldiers Monument to honor the men killed in the "Battle of Osawatomie". The cabin, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Creator: Bloom Bros. Co., Minneapolis, Minn
Date: Between 1912 and 1927
This postcard shows the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was later sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia men. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1912 and 1928
These two postcards show a view of the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was later sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia men. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Creator: Uhls, Bessie B.
Date: Between 1880s and 1912s
This colored postcard shows the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1912
This sepia-colored postcard shows the backside of the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1880 and 1912
These two sepia-colored photographs show the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Creator: Walker, Russell W.
Date: Between 1928 and 1959
This black and white photograph shows the Adair-Brown cabin at the John Brown Memorial Park in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn was later sold ,in 1855, to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1912 and 1928
This sepia-colored postcard shows a view of the caretakers cottage (on left) and the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was later sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia men. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1912
These two postcards show a view of the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1900 and 1919
This stereograph shows Emma Florilla Adair Remington and her two daughters Ada and Jessie in front of the Adair-Brown cabin before it was moved to the John Brown Memorial Park in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1880 and 1912
This illustration shows the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site. In 1971, it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair-Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1912 and 1928
This sepia-colored postcard shows a view of the Adair-Brown cabin in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure, built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn, was later sold in 1855 to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia men. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adair Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas

Adair Brown cabin, Osawatomie, Kansas
Date: Between 1928 and 1965
This black and white photograph shows the Adair-Brown cabin at the John Brown Memorial Park in Osawatomie, Kansas. The structure built around 1854 by Samuel Glenn was sold, in 1855, to John Brown's brother-in-law Samuel Lyle Adair. The cabin provided a home for the Adair family but was frequently used by Brown for abolitionist activities. In 1912, the structure was moved to the highest point in the John Brown Memorial Park which is also the site of the "Battle of Osawatomie" where John Brown and thirty free-state defenders fought in 1856 against 250 pro-slavery militia. A stone pavilion was built in 1928 to protect the cabin's exterior. The state legislature appointed the Kansas Historical Society to maintain the site and in 1971 it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Adolphus Dauphin Thompson

Adolphus Dauphin Thompson
Date: 1859
Portrait of Adolphus Dauphin Thompson, one of John Brown's men. He was killed at Harpers Ferry.


Adolphus Dauphin Thompson

Adolphus Dauphin Thompson
Creator: Hinton, Richard J . (Richard Josiah), 1830-1901
Date: 1859
Sketch of Adolphus Thompson for illustration in Richard Hinton's book; John Brown and His Men. He was killed at Harpers Ferry. Two of his siblings were married to Brown's children.


Affidavits concerning William and Henry Sherman, and Allen Wilkinson

Affidavits concerning William and Henry Sherman, and Allen Wilkinson
Creator: Grant, John T.
Date: June 12, 1856
This document contains brief affidavit statements made by several free state supporters of the character and personal habits of William and Henry Sherman, and Allen Wilkinson, who were described as "intemperate" men. William Sherman and Allen Wilkinson were among the five pro-slavery settlers killed in the Pottawatomie Massacre in May, 1856. The document is written in the same hand (suggesting that its statements were either recorded or copied by the same person), and is identified as "Potawatomie, Franklin County, Kansas Territory, June 12, 1856."


Albert Hazlett

Albert Hazlett
Creator: Hinton, Richard J . (Richard Josiah), 1830-1901
Date: 1859
A pen and ink drawing of Albert Hazlett, who was one of John Brown's men. It was used as an illustration in Richard J. Hinton's book, John Brown and His Men.


Albert Hazlett

Albert Hazlett
Date: 1859
Portrait of Albert Hazlett, one of John Brown's men. He was captured and executed at Harpers Ferry, Virginia.


Annals of Kansas, January - February, 1855

Annals of Kansas, January - February, 1855
Creator: Wilder, Daniel Webster, 1832-1911
Date: January, 1855 through February, 1855
D. W. Wilder's "Annals of Kansas," published in 1886, provides a day-by-day chronicle of significant events in Kansas. These are digital images of Annals of Kansas entries for the territorial period of 1854-1861.


Antislavery Mass Meeting

Antislavery Mass Meeting
Date: November 26, 1859
Advertisement of an antislavery meeting to be held on December 2, 1859, in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, on the day that abolitionist John Brown was executed.


Articles of Agreement for Shubel Morgan's Company

Articles of Agreement for Shubel Morgan's Company
Creator: Morgan, Shubel
Date: July 12, 1858
In July 1858, fifteen men including Shubel Morgan, alias John Brown, J. H. Kagi, James Montgomery, and Augustus Wattles signed this document and thus "agree[d] to be governed by the following rules" of conduct. The rules included "gentlemanly and respectful deportment," obedience to the commander's orders, "no intoxicating drinks," etc.


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