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Altgeld's great speech

Altgeld's great speech
Creator: Altgeld, John P.
Date: 1898
A speech delivered by John P. Altgeld to the working men of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on Labor Day, 1897. Altgeld's idea was that government ownership is the remedy for the nation's existing troubles.


Discourse of Mr. Benton, of Missouri: before the Maryland Institute

Discourse of Mr. Benton, of Missouri: before the Maryland Institute
Creator: Benton, Thomas Hart, 1782-1858
Date: 1854
The discourse of Mr. Benton of Missouri, before the Maryland Institute, on the physical geography of the country between Missouri and California, with viewpoints on its adoption to settlement and the construction of a railroad. This lecture was delivered at Baltimore, Maryland, on December, 1854.


Dividends of safety

Dividends of safety
Creator: Union Pacific Railway Company
Date: September 30, 1925
This pamphlet contains the text of the address made by Carl R. Gray, president of the Union Pacific System, before an annual banquet of the National Safety Council in Cleveland, Ohio, on September 30, 1925. The address begins with a brief history of railroads excerpted from "First Spikes in Railway History in England and America" by A. Saintsby (1925). Gray then describes the history of the Safety Movement on Railroad, and the safety measures employed by the Union Pacific Railway Company to guarantee safe rail travel on their system ("Lives saved, limbs saved, homes saved -- 'these are the Dividends of Safety'").


Facts proved by figures showing what prohibition has done for Kansas

Facts proved by figures showing what prohibition has done for Kansas
Creator: Stubbs, Walter Roscoe, 1858-1929
Date: March 27, 1910
A speech by Governor Walter Stubbs on prohibition's effect on Kansas, delivered at The Great Northern Theatre in Chicago, Illinois, on March 27, 1910.


Governor's Message vetoing the Kickapoo ferry

Governor's Message vetoing the Kickapoo ferry
Creator: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: July 21, 1855
This item is a printed letter by Governor Andrew Reeder to the legislature, informing them that he had vetoed the bill to incorporate a ferry in Kickapoo, Kansas Territory. Reeder reminds the legislature that they were to meet at Ft. Leavenworth and not at the Shawnee Manual Labor School.


Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, invitations and speeches

Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence, invitations and speeches
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1929-1931 : Reed)
Date: 1929-1931
This file includes subject correspondence relating to invitations and speeches given by and for Governor Reed. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Clyde M. Reed correspondence.


Governor George Hodges speech

Governor George Hodges speech
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1913-1915 : Hodges)
Date: January 15, 1913
Governor Hodges gave this speech to the Kansas House of Representatives discouraging the possible passage of a Jim Crow law. Many black Kansans were afraid these laws were going to be passed in Kansas particularly because Oklahoma had so many already in place. Governor Hodges urged that this law or any other of its kind should not be passed. In the end, the Jim Crow law failed to pass.


Governor George Monroe Beebe, annual message

Governor George Monroe Beebe, annual message
Creator: Beebe, George Monroe 1836-1927
Date: January 10, 1861
George Beebe assumed the title of Acting Governor of Kansas Territory upon the resignation of Samuel Medary. In this printed message from the Executive Office, Kansas Territory (Lecompton) to the territorial legislature, Beebe commented on Medary and other issues relating to Kansas Territory. He included information from the auditor about the amount of taxes that had been collected. He also referenced the pending dissolution of the Union and the "gloom" that brought to all.


James Henry Hammond of South Carolina, speech

James Henry Hammond of South Carolina, speech
Creator: Hammond, James H.
Date: March 4, 1858
Senator James Hammond offered this speech as a rebuttal to those recently presented by Senators in oppositon to his perspective, questioning their argument that the Lecompton Constitutional Convention was a tool of the Territorial Government to maintain the dominance of proslavery policy. Hammond maintained instead that the Convention was "an assembly of the people in their highest sovereign capacity" and thus acted with the will of the majority of Kansas citizens. He also indicated that the South did not feel threated by the possibility of Kansas becoming a free state, as their exports and businesses were well off even without the increased foreign slave trade that Kansas potentially could bring.


James William Denver, Address to the people of Kansas

James William Denver, Address to the people of Kansas
Creator: Denver, James William, 1817-1892
Date: December 21, 1857
Initial address from Gov. Denver indicating his instructions from the president.


John Jordan Crittenden, speech on the Admission of the State of Kansas

John Jordan Crittenden, speech on the Admission of the State of Kansas
Creator: Crittenden, John J. (John Jordan), 1787-1863
Date: March 17, 1858
John J. Crittenden, a Senator of Kentucky, delivered this speech, which addressed the debate over Kansas Territory's admission to the Union under the Lecompton Constitution, on the floor of the Senate. Crittenden, himself a Southerner, contended that there was enough evidence to indicate that the Constitution that had been submitted was not well supported by the citizens of Kansas Territory, and proposed an idea which would become known as the "Crittenden Amendment" which called for the ratification of the whole Lecompton Constitution by a popular vote in the Territory before Kansas could be admitted as a state under it.


Kansas' great progress under prohibition

Kansas' great progress under prohibition
Creator: Hodges, George H. (George Hartshorn), 1866-1947
Date: November 12, 1913
An address delivered by Kansas Governor George H. Hodges at the Fifteenth National Convention of the Anti-Saloon League of America in Columbus, Ohio, on November 12, 1913


Lincoln in Kansas

Lincoln in Kansas
Creator: Kansas State Historical Society
Date: December 3, 1859
This article was published in the Kansas Historical Collections and includes synopses of Lincoln's speeches during his visit to Kansas in 1859, reminiscences of those present during his visit, and background material and annotations.


Money more sacred than men

Money more sacred than men
Creator: Vincent, William Davis, 1852-1922
Date: 1898
This speech was give by W. D. Vincent, a member of the U. S. House of Representatives from Kansas on April 28, 1898. He was a Populist. This speech is about Vincent's opposition to funding the Spanish American War with bonds. In the process, he criticizes the practices of the House of Representatives that discourage input from new members and particularly those in the minority parties (Democratic and Populist.) He was opposed to the amount of interest that would be paid on the bonds that were to provide the funds to undertake the war. He states his support for the war but believed that issuing bonds would put additional power in the hands of the wealthy.


Organization of the free state government in Kansas with the inaugural speech and message of Governor Robinson

Organization of the free state government in Kansas with the inaugural speech and message of Governor Robinson
Date: March 4, 1856
This pamphlet provides a vivid description of the scene, players, and proceedings of the initial sessions of the free-state government convened in Topeka. From Governor Charles Robinson's inaugural speech, the intent of the new legislature was clear: they convened in order to formulate a state government which would serve their political interests and would reflect the principle of "squatter [popular] sovereignty", since the existing territorial government was merely provisional and furthermore did not advance their free-state aspirations.


Organized labor in Wyandotte County

Organized labor in Wyandotte County
Creator: Martin, George W. (George Washington), 1841-1914
Date: 1899
An address by George W. Martin, editor of the Kansas City Gazette, to the Mayor and City Council of Kansas City, Kansas, focusing on organized labor in Wyandotte County.


Powerless for good but powerful for evil

Powerless for good but powerful for evil
Creator: Griffin, Albert
Date: October 06, 1887
An address by Albert Griffin to the Third Party Prohibitionists delivered in the Church of the Saviour in New York City, New York on October 6, 1887. Griffin, the Chairman of the Anti-Saloon Republican National Committee, focuses on temperance, economics, and politics in his speech.


Prohibition in Kansas

Prohibition in Kansas
Creator: Troutman, James A.
Date: May 24, 1885
A speech on prohibition delivered by James A. Troutman of Topeka, Kansas, at Elm street Methodist Episcopal Church in Toronto, Canada, on May 24, 1885.


Prohibition in Kansas

Prohibition in Kansas
Creator: Thacher, Solon Otis, 1830-1895
Date: January 29, 1883
An address delivered by the Honorable S.O. Thacher on prohibition. The speech was delivered in the Kansas State Senate on January 29, 1883, in answer to the speech of Senator Everest.


Prohibition in Kansas

Prohibition in Kansas
Creator: National Temperance Society and Publication House
Date: 1882
Prohibition in Kansas speeches by Kansas Governor John P. St. John and Georgia Governor A.H. Colquitt, at the Brooklyn Tabernacle, on January 22,1882. This is essentially the same edition as unit 211546 printed in 1884 except for page 23 which includes a different list of new temperance publications.


Prohibition in Kansas

Prohibition in Kansas
Creator: National Temperance Society and Publication House
Date: 1884
An address on prohibition in Kansas by Governor John P. St. John of Kansas and Governor A.H. Colquitt of Georgia, held in the Brooklyn Tabernacle, New York, on January 22,1882. This is essentially the same edition as unit 212721 printed in 1882 except for page 23 which includes an earlier list of new temperance publications.


Prohibition in Kansas.  From every viewpoint a beneficient and permanent success proven by a thrity-year test.

Prohibition in Kansas. From every viewpoint a beneficient and permanent success proven by a thrity-year test.
Creator: Coburn, F. D. (Foster Dwight), 1846-1924
Date: January 29, 1910
A speech delivered by F.D Coburn, Secretary of Kansas Department of Agriculture and President of the State Temperance Union, at the Kansas Day Dinner of the Chicago Kansas Day Club, Chicago, Illinois.


Prohibition reviewed

Prohibition reviewed
Creator: Eldridge, J.L.
Date: October 12, 1887
A speech on prohibition in Kansas by J.L. Eldridge of Topeka, Kansas, delivered before the Baptist State Convention at Salina, Kansas.


Prohibition reviewed.  Its marvelous success in Kansas.

Prohibition reviewed. Its marvelous success in Kansas.
Creator: Eldridge, J.L.
Date: October 12, 1887
An address delivered by J.L. Eldridge, of Topeka, Kansas, at the Baptist State Convention in Salina, Kansas. The speech focused on prohibition and it's continued success in Kansas.


Reuben Eaton Fenton, speech "The Designs of the Slave Power"

Reuben Eaton Fenton, speech "The Designs of the Slave Power"
Creator: Fenton, Reuben E. (Reuben Eaton), 1819-1885
Date: February 24, 1858
Representative Reuben Fenton, of New York, delivered this speech on the floor of the House of Representatives, in reaction to the Congressional debate over the validity of the Lecompton Constitution. Believing that the repeal of the Missouri Compromise was a mistake, meant to allow the extension of slavery into the new territories, Fenton emphasized that their forefathers recognized that slavery and anti-slavery men could not coexist. Thus, under the authority outlined in the Constitution, slavery in all Territories should be abolished, in line with the Federal Government's duty to "install a government [in the Territories] conducive to the greatest degree of happiness and welfare" of its residents. Fenton did not believe that the Lecompton Constitution represented the will of Kansas' citizens, insisting that the majority, as free state supporters, were proposing no challenge to the Government constructed by the founding fathers.


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