Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

Winter 1977, Volume 43, Number 4

-

Random Item

Walker Winslow correspondence Walker Winslow correspondence

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 636,155
Bookbag items: 37,352
Registered users: 11,348

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 20

Category Filters

Government and Politics - Territorial Government - Governors - Stanton, Frederick Perry (acting)

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 20 of 20 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 11, 1861
From Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Robinson writes his wife Sara, who was still in the East, concerning Jim Lane's efforts to destroy Robinson's influence. The governor is not too worried, however, and writes that he could "by paying a little attention to the matter make him smell worse than ever. He and his friends are already beginning to falter in their course for fear that I will turn the tables on them which I can do with ease."


Edmund Burke Whitman to Franklin B. Sanborn

Edmund Burke Whitman to Franklin B. Sanborn
Creator: Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883
Date: May 18, 1857
In his May 18 report to Franklin Sanborn, agent Whitman of Lawrence again cast shame on Massachusetts for its failure to provided needed financial support for the cause in Kansas but focused on his efforts to provide aid for "the school project." Whitman claimed credit for establishing both an elementary school and a high school, the latter of which "is fast becoming a Model," and he hoped his financing would not disappear. He also comments on the political situation, especially the fact that Charles Robinson had "to a large extent" lost the "confidence" of the people.


Frederick P. Stanton

Frederick P. Stanton
Date: Between 1860 and 1865
This is a photograph of Frederick P. Stanton who served as acting Kansas Territorial Governor from April to May 27, 1857 and November 16 to December 21, 1857.


Frederick P. Stanton

Frederick P. Stanton
Date: 1858
This is a drawing of Frederick P. Stanton, acting Territorial Governor of Kansas, who served from April to May 27, 1857 and Novermver 16, 1857 to December 21, 1857. The drawing was from a photograph by Gurney and appeared in an unidentified magazine.


Frederick Stanton bust

Frederick Stanton bust
Creator: Stone, Horatio
Date: Unknown date
A bust of Frederick Perry Stanton (1814-1894) who served as acting territorial governor of Kansas Territory from April 15 to May 27, 1857 and November 16 to December 21, 1857.


James H. Holmes to John Brown

James H. Holmes to John Brown
Creator: Holmes, James H.
Date: April 30, 1857
From Lawrence, on April 30, 1857, Holmes wrote to urge Brown to contact him directly regarding the ominous state of affairs in the territory at that time. Acting governor Frederick Stanton had announced that the "Bogus" laws would be enforced and "The people shout--Never!" Stanton promised "war to the knife and the knife to the hilt."


Joseph Harrington Trego to Alice Trego

Joseph Harrington Trego to Alice Trego
Creator: Trego, Joseph H. (Joseph Harrington), 1823-1905
Date: December 21, 1857
Joseph Trego wrote from Sugar Mound, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Alice, in Illinois. Trego, in addition to elaborating on hunting and mill work, described at length the skirmishing between local free state and proslavery men, which had been continuous throughout the summer and fall. He reported the manner in which Missourians had seized and occupied lands in the absence of their owners, who were free state men. "Bogus courts" had brought the free state men who defended their lands to court, which resulted in so many fees owed that the men had to sell their land to pay them; the new owners were usually Missourians. Trego accused proslavery supporters of fabricating stories about destruction caused by warring Abolitionists in order to draw the support of the U.S. troops. Controversy over the Lecompton Constitution flourished in free state circles; the Free State Legislature in Topeka had repealed the "bogus laws" of the Territorial Legislature and appointed James Lane the head of a free state militia.


Joseph Root to William Hutchinson

Joseph Root to William Hutchinson
Creator: Root, Joseph P., 1826-1885
Date: November 17, 1857
Writing from Wyandotte City, Kansas Territory, Joseph Pomeroy Root reported that Governor Robert J. Walker had passed by Wyandotte City that morning on a steamer and was bound for Washington, D. C. Root speculated that Walker's administration was in jeopardy, and made other comments that reflected the negative view of Free State party members towards pro-slavery Democrats in Kansas.


Mount Aeolia, home of Territorial Governor Frederick P. Stanton, Lecompton, Kansas

Mount Aeolia, home of Territorial Governor Frederick P. Stanton, Lecompton, Kansas
Creator: Walker, Russell W.
Date: Between 1930 and 1948
A photograph of Mount Aeolia, the home of Territorial Governor Frederick P. Stanton, near Lecompton, Kansas. The house would later be owned by Governor Harry Woodring.


Mount Aeolia, home of Territorial Governor Frederick P. Stanton, Lecompton, Kansas

Mount Aeolia, home of Territorial Governor Frederick P. Stanton, Lecompton, Kansas
Date: Between 1870 and 1900
A photograph of Mount Aeolia, the home of Territorial Governor Frederick P. Stanton, near Lecompton, Kansas. The house would later be owned by Governor Harry Woodring.


Mount Aeolia, home of Territorial Governor Frederick P. Stanton, Lecompton, Kansas

Mount Aeolia, home of Territorial Governor Frederick P. Stanton, Lecompton, Kansas
Date: 1939
Two views of Mount Aeolia, the home of Territorial Governor Frederick P. Stanton, near Lecompton, Kansas. The house would later be owned by Governor Harry Woodring.


Robert John Walker, Proclamation : To the people of Kansas

Robert John Walker, Proclamation : To the people of Kansas
Creator: Walker, Robert J. (Robert John), 1801-1869
Date: October 19, 1857
Regards the examination of election returns, particularly Oxford Precinct, Johnson County.


Samuel C. Smith to Charles Robinson

Samuel C. Smith to Charles Robinson
Creator: Smith, Samuel C.
Date: December 7, 1858
In this letter from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Samuel C. Smith wrote in some detail about developments with respect to the Delaware lands, apparently connected to a railroad promotion scheme. The Indians "know that [Robert S.] Stevens is connected with the R. R. enterprise and this action of his . . . Has excited their mistrust and caused obstacles to rise in the way of such a treaty as you [Robinson] desire."


Sol Miller to Gov. Charles Robinson

Sol Miller to Gov. Charles Robinson
Creator: Miller, Sol (Solomon), 1831-1897
Date: February 28, 1861
Written less than a month after Kansas became a state, Miller comments on the developing political situation as a carry over from the territorial period, reflecting, for example, on the conflict between the governor and James H. Lane and the selection of U.S. senators for Kansas. Miller had supported Robinson in the past and was now seeking appointment to a particular "Agency," but he refused "sell" his support to anyone for such a position.


Thomas Ewing, Jr., to John Hanna

Thomas Ewing, Jr., to John Hanna
Creator: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896
Date: January 26, 1860
In this letter to a friend in Greencastle, Indiana, Ewing made numerous observations about the state of Kansas politics, of which he wrote: "Politics in Kansas you know are a business to those caught in the whirlpool." Ewing thought the state government was "pretty well officered" but was concerned about prospects for the senatorial contest. "Lane is nearly dead with the politicians. . . But he is a power with the people. . . . I look on Lane as a decidedly bad man," even though he recognized Lane's positive "service to the cause before the [Lawrence free-state] Convention in Decr 1857."


Thomas Ewing, Jr., to John Sherman

Thomas Ewing, Jr., to John Sherman
Creator: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861
To Congressman, soon to be U.S. senator, John Sherman of Ohio, Ewing wrote to encourage Sherman to support Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. "It is a matter of very great importance to the people of Kansas that a Comr should be apptd who would exert himself to have the numerous reserves in our borders reduced, and such of the Tribes removed southward as wish to get out of our way . . . ." Ewing also mentioned the pending bill for "the admission of Kansas."


Thomas Ewing, Jr.,  to Joseph J. Coombs

Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Joseph J. Coombs
Creator: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896
Date: January 22, 1861
In January 1861 Ewing wrote several letters to members of Congress and others of influence in Washington on behalf of Charles Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs. This one, marked "Private," to J. J. Coombs is one example. Not only was Robinson well qualified for this important position, according to Ewing, but Robinson's appointment to this influential post would increase Ewing's chance to capture a Senate seat--"If he can get the appt before the State Legislature sits it will so greatly strengthen his influence that my election will be certain."


Thomas Ewing, Jr.,  to Thomas Ewing, Sr.

Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Thomas Ewing, Sr.
Creator: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896
Date: January 20, 1861
As with the January 17 letter to his brother, Ewing, Jr., stressed the significance of Robinson's appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs in this letter to his father in Lancaster, Ohio. Ewing expressed high regard for Robinson's abilities and believed he had wide support, from virtually every "republican of note in Kansas save Jim: Lane."


Thomas J. Marsh to George Luther Stearns

Thomas J. Marsh to George Luther Stearns
Creator: Marsh, Thomas J.
Date: August 20, 1857
In his August 20, 1857, report to Stearns, Marsh again asked for some clarification on a couple payment issues and described his role for the committee (Mass. State Kansas Committee) with regard to Jim Lane's efforts to organize protection for free state voters. For a short while, things looked good for the Free State cause, but Governor Walker's conduct to date had been disruptive and Judge Cato and friends began to issue arrest warrants.


Topeka, Kansas Territory, act to incorporate

Topeka, Kansas Territory, act to incorporate
Date: February 14, 1857 & April 22, 1857
This act, handwritten by Cyrus K. Holliday, was passed by the territorial legislature at Lecompton on February 14th, 1857. Its three sections established the city limits of Topeka, designated a board of trustees, and secured the city's rights. Fred P. Stanton, Secretary of the Territory of Kansas, certified this copy of the act.


Showing 1 - 20

Copyright © 2007-2020 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.