Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

undated 1977 (Box 49, Folder 4)

-

Random Item

Ross J. Rummel, World War I soldier Ross J. Rummel, World War I soldier

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 597,320
Bookbag items: 35,876
Registered users: 10,936

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 30

Category Filters

Government and Politics - Territorial Government - Governors - Geary, John White

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 25 of 30 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)
Next Page >


Charles Robinson  to John Brown

Charles Robinson to John Brown
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 13, 1856
Charles Robinson wrote to John Brown from Lawrence on September 13, 1856, a short note encouraging Brown to give Governor Geary, who "talks of letting the past be forgotten," a chance and to come to town to "see us." A note from John Brown, Jr., on the bottom of the page, however, advised caution, as he had "no doubt an attempt will be made to arrest you as well as Lane."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 20, 1856
From Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Charles Robinson updates his wife on developments in and around Lawrence since her departure. Governor John W. Geary had arrived and promises to see that the Missouri militia who were then threatening Lawrence "were disbanded." Robinson goes on to describe a very tense few days in September, beginning on Friday the 12th, involving militia of both sides and the governor. After a brief skirmish on the prairie east of Lawrence, Geary and some U.S. troops arrived and "the Missourians agreed to go home. It was all a farce. . . ."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 29, 1856
Writing from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Charles Robinson writes to his wife, Sara Robinson, who was traveling East via Chicago, Illinois. After kidding her about how well-known she was becoming, he comments unfavorably on Governor John W. Geary, who "thinks he is awful smart & is getting rediculous fast." Robinson also mentions the forthcoming legislative election (October 6, 1856)--"We shall not vote."


Complaint about seizure of Briscoe Davis's house and family

Complaint about seizure of Briscoe Davis's house and family
Date: November 18, 1856
According to an explanation written by Edward Hoogland on the outside of the document, Briscoe Davis' sister (unnamed) wrote this complaint describing the October 24, 1856 looting of Mr. Davis' house in Linn County by free state supporters led by a Captain Holmes (likely James R. Holmes, a Free State Militia captain). The seizure of Davis' home took place shortly after Governor John Geary's October 1856 visit to southeastern Kansas Territory.


Diary, Franklin L. Crane

Diary, Franklin L. Crane
Creator: Crane, Franklin L.
Date: February 23, 1855 - September 29, 1856
The entries pertaining to Kansas Territory began on page 18, with Franklin Crane leaving his home in Easton, Pennsylvania with his son, Franklin Jr. He described their journey to Kansas and their initial impressions and travels while in the territory. In June 1855, he returned to Easton to sell his property so he could then return to Kansas. The later entries began in September of 1856 and described tensions in Topeka with efforts to build a fort and rumors of armed Missourians in the area.


Dunn to Thomas W. Higginson

Dunn to Thomas W. Higginson
Date: October 23, 1856
In this letter to Reverend Thomas W. Higginson, who was an agent of the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee, Mr. Dunn writes from Oskaloosa, Iowa, about his attempts to gather together a company of men as a response to Gov. Gary's [sic] election and the U. S. Army's efforts to arrest many prominent free state men. According to the author, "the U. S. troops by the order of Gary [sic] are taking every free State man they can get hold of." He is eager to hear advice from Higginson about the best way to proceed, and he lays out his plan to amass about 60 men to fight against the border ruffians who have invaded the territory. He hopes that Higginson would support him in this matter by obtaining provisions. Dunn maintains that this plan comes from his sense of duty; it does not arise from a warlike spirit.


G. S. Lewis to Samuel L. Adair

G. S. Lewis to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Lewis, G. S.
Date: December 12, 1856
G. S. Lewis,a friend of Samuel Adair, writes from Albany in Athens County, Ohio. Lewis was concerned about the safety of the Adair family, and commented on the trials they must be suffering. He comments on the bravery of Charley, the Adair's son who helped warn Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, of the coming of proslavery forces prior to the Battle of Osawatomie. Lewis also comments on John Brown, Gov. Geary, John Freemont, and the political situation in Kansas Territory and nationally. He shares rumors of slave insurrections in Kentucky and Tennessee.


George W. Hunt and C. Stearns to Blood, Hutchinson, et. al.

George W. Hunt and C. Stearns to Blood, Hutchinson, et. al.
Creator: Hunt, George W.
Date: September 29, 1856
On behalf of a committee of Lawrence citizens, Hunt and Stearns write the State Central Committee of Kansas "to urge upon your attention several important points in reference to the present condition of Kansas." They were convinced that a "storm" from Missouri was about "to burst upon the devoted heads of the freemen of Kansas" and "perhaps to deluge Kansas with rivers of blood." The committee urges the state and national organizations to help them prepare for the storm, while things were relatively calm, with an adequate supply of arms and ammunition and men. They call only for "moral heroes" who would not follow the "principles of Border Ruffianism."


Governor Geary's residence, Lecompton, Territorial Kansas

Governor Geary's residence, Lecompton, Territorial Kansas
Creator: Harpers Weekly
Date: June 06, 1857
An illustration from Harper's Weekly titled "The Governor's Mansion, Lecompton, Kansas Territory." The mansion was a six-room log cabin that was built for Governor John W. Geary.


Hiram Hill to H.M. Simpson

Hiram Hill to H.M. Simpson
Creator: Hill, Hiram, 1804-
Date: January 31, 1857
Hiram Hill drafted a letter from Williamsburgh, Massachusetts, to H. M. Simpson, brother of Samuel N. Simpson, in Kansas Territory. Hill responded to H. M.'s favorable impressions of property investments in K.T., and hoped that his anticipations would come to pass. Hill planned to travel to the Territory as soon as his affairs were in order, and inquired about further investment prospects and the going wage for construction tradesmen. He spoke favorably of Governor Gerry (sic, Geary), but feared that the "bogus legislature" would impede his ability to govern.


Hiram Hill to O.G. Hill

Hiram Hill to O.G. Hill
Creator: Hill, Hiram, 1804-
Date: March 18, 1857
Hiram Hill, en route to Kansas Territory, wrote from Jefferson City, Missouri, to his brother back east. Hill reported that the journey so far had been pleasant, though they had been delayed by a train wreck and were currently waiting for a boat to take them up the River. He mentioned his experiences with border ruffians, finding that they were "civil" unless they "get too much whiskey down". Hill lamented the resignation of Kansas Territory's Governor Geary, but related that he saw the new marshal, who was on his way to K.T., in St. Louis.


J. Henry Muzzy to Eli Thayer

J. Henry Muzzy to Eli Thayer
Creator: Muzzy, J. Henry
Date: March 3, 1857
J. Henry Muzzy wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Eli Thayer in Worcester, Massachusetts. Muzzy informed Thayer that free state supporters in Kansas were not, as Thayer had predicted, discouraged by James Buchanan's election as president in November 1856. He observed that the territory had been quiet during the winter of 1856-1857, but warned that the "ruffians" likely would engage in efforts during the spring of 1857 to discourage eastern emigration to Kansas. Muzzy also commented on the dilemma that free staters faced in deciding whether to pay the taxes levied by the proslavery "bogus legislature." He and his fellow free state supporters were not inclined to pay taxes imposed by a "foreign power," but they also realized that if Governor Geary called in U.S. troops to enforce the law they would have no choice but to pay. Muzzy concluded by stating that he was thankful for the end of the "reign of Frank Pierce," contending that "any change at Washington can hardly be for the worse."


James H. Greene to  John Brown

James H. Greene to John Brown
Creator: Greene, James H.
Date: March 24, 1857
James Greene, who had spent two years in Kansas himself, wrote from his Jefferson (hometown of Senator Benjamin F. Wade), Ashtabula Co., Ohio, newspaper office (Ashtabula Sentinel) to inform his friend that he would be publishing Brown's circular "soliciting aid for Kansas" and to ask what Brown's future plans were. The news from the territory was not good, according to Greene, and he wondered if there would be war or peace. Greene was still hopeful that the "free state men will eventually triumph," but most of his neighbors believed Kansas "will be a Slave State."


James M. Winchell to Thaddeus Hyatt

James M. Winchell to Thaddeus Hyatt
Creator: Winchell, James M
Date: September 20, 1856
James M. Winchell wrote from Burlington to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, regarding an emigrant train of 500 settlers heading south from Iowa City. The author intended to travel to speak with Governor Geary before he met up with the emigrants. Winchell also included in this letter a private insert pertaining to the unscrupulous dealings of a Kansas politician named Dr. Root.


Jefferson Davis, Secretary of War; report

Jefferson Davis, Secretary of War; report
Date: May 23, 1856 - November 12, 1856
Jefferson Davis, Secretary of War, submitted a number of documents in his report to the President that was submitted to the "Two Houses of Congress" on December 2, 1856. There were three sections of documents. Part 1 consisted of letters from the Secretary of War (Davis) and the Adjutant General ( S. Cooper) (pp. 27--35) to Colonel E.V. Sumner, General P. F. Smith, the governors of Kentucky and Illinois, and Major Emery, in relation to a militia force to be employed to aid the legitimate Territorial Government in Kansas Territory. Part 2 (pp.35--61) contained various reports from Colonel E. V. Sumner, commaning officer of the 1st Cavalry at Fort Leavenworth about events in Kansas. The reports include correspondence from Wilson Shannon, territorial governor, and various officers of the 1st Cavalry from Lecompton, Tecumseh, and other locations in the territory. Part 3 (pp. 62-146) was headed "Reports for the Department of the West" and included correspondence from various military officers about the activities of United States troops at various locations in Kansas Territory. This section contained several letters from Daniel Woodson and John Geary, territorial officials. A few non-Kansas items relating to dealings with Native Americans were interspersed among the Kansas Territory correspondence. From the Senate Executive Documents, 34th Congress, 3rd session, Report of the Secretary of War


John Brown, Jr., to John Brown

John Brown, Jr., to John Brown
Creator: Brown, Jr., John
Date: September 8, 1856
Still in the custody of territorial officials, John Brown, Jr., wrote to express his remorse upon learning of the death of his brother Frederick--at least he was relieved to learn that his father and Jason were safe, as early reports had them dead or missing. "Poor Frederick has perished in a good cause!" wrote John, Jr., "the success of which cause I trust will yet bring joy to millions." He then wrote of his forthcoming trial and possible plan to "escape in case it should appear best."


John Geary

John Geary
Date: Unknown
John Geary on horse (Civil War)


John W. Geary

John W. Geary
Creator: Draper & Husted, photographers
John White Geary (b. December 30, 1819, d. February 8, 1873) served as the third Governor of Kansas Territory from September 9, 1856 to March 12, 1857. Geary was a lawyer, politician (the final alcalde and first mayor of San Francisco, governor of the Kansas Territory, and governor of Pennsylvania), and a Union general in the American Civil War.


John W. Geary

John W. Geary
Date: Between 1861 and 1865
John W. Geary, third Kansas Territorial Governor and Major General of the US Volunteers. Photograph shows Geary in military uniform.


Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, proclamation

Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, proclamation
Creator: Murphey, William E.
Date: September 29, 1856
This proclamation, written by William E. Murphy, the mayor of Leavenworth, Kansas Territory, announces that he would use the forces of the law against any person who sent an anonymous communication requesting that a citizen of Leavenworth leave the territory. Murphy encourages the citizens of the city to "frown down any secret Conspiracy against law." It also mentions that such action is contrary to the interests of both the government and the Law and Order Party.


Names of prisoners in custody at Lecompton

Names of prisoners in custody at Lecompton
Creator: Hoogland, Edward
Date: November 12, 1856
A list of free state prisoners in custody at Lecompton, Kansas Territory. Most of the prisoners had been captured at the Battle of Hickory Point on September 13, 1856. The list records each prisoner's name, previous state of residence, and reason for imprisonment. The last page of the document lists prisoners who had been released. The list was prepared by Edward Hoogland by order of Governor John Geary.


Orville C. Brown to Samuel L. Adair

Orville C. Brown to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904
Date: January 21, 1857
Orville Chester Brown wrote from Utica, New York, to Samuel Adair in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Brown wrote about speaking engagements on behalf of Kansas, and mentioned Governor Geary and President Pierce.


Paul Shepherd to James Redpath

Paul Shepherd to James Redpath
Creator: Shepherd, Paul
Date: January 3, 1860
From Dover, Michigan, Paul Shepherd--formerly of Kansas Territory--writes James Redpath to pass along "some useful information, in repect to John H. Kagi." Of most interest, perhaps, is Shepherd's account of the "shoot out" at Tecumseh, Kansas Territory, between Kagi and Judge Rush Elmore, who Kagi had accused of "being a prime mover in the murderous attack upon him" at Lecompton, Kansas Territory, in mid-January, 1857.


R.  P.  Bourn to Franklin Crane

R. P. Bourn to Franklin Crane
Creator: Bourn, R. P.
Date: October 18, 1856
R. P. Bourn, writing from Nicholasville, Kentucky, addressed this letter to Franklin Crane of Topeka, Kansas Territory. Bourn stated his anti-slavery beliefs clearly, and discussed politics both in Kansas and at the national level, including the Presidential election of 1856.


R. S. Griffithe, N. W. Spicer, and J. A. Harvey testimonies

R. S. Griffithe, N. W. Spicer, and J. A. Harvey testimonies
Date: December 6, 1856
These testimonies, collected by the National Kansas Committee, record the experiences of three settlers during the turbulent times of Bleeding Kansas. The testimonies focus on each settler's involvement in free-state activities, and their interaction with Missouri border ruffians. Griffithe and Spicer both served in the free-state militia, and Harvey, who had commanded an emigrant train from Chicago, was the commander of a free-state company.


Showing 1 - 25
Next Page >

Copyright © 2007-2019 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.