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History of Woodson County

History of Woodson County
Creator: Jones, Mrs. S.E. Chase
Date: 1877
A history of Woodson County, Kansas, written by Mrs. S.E. Chase Jones.


Jefferson Davis, Secretary of War; report

Jefferson Davis, Secretary of War; report
Date: May 23, 1856 - November 12, 1856
Jefferson Davis, Secretary of War, submitted a number of documents in his report to the President that was submitted to the "Two Houses of Congress" on December 2, 1856. There were three sections of documents. Part 1 consisted of letters from the Secretary of War (Davis) and the Adjutant General ( S. Cooper) (pp. 27--35) to Colonel E.V. Sumner, General P. F. Smith, the governors of Kentucky and Illinois, and Major Emery, in relation to a militia force to be employed to aid the legitimate Territorial Government in Kansas Territory. Part 2 (pp.35--61) contained various reports from Colonel E. V. Sumner, commaning officer of the 1st Cavalry at Fort Leavenworth about events in Kansas. The reports include correspondence from Wilson Shannon, territorial governor, and various officers of the 1st Cavalry from Lecompton, Tecumseh, and other locations in the territory. Part 3 (pp. 62-146) was headed "Reports for the Department of the West" and included correspondence from various military officers about the activities of United States troops at various locations in Kansas Territory. This section contained several letters from Daniel Woodson and John Geary, territorial officials. A few non-Kansas items relating to dealings with Native Americans were interspersed among the Kansas Territory correspondence. From the Senate Executive Documents, 34th Congress, 3rd session, Report of the Secretary of War


John H. Kagi to his father

John H. Kagi to his father
Creator: Kagi, John Henry
Date: September 4, 1856
From Topeka, Kansas Territory, Kagi writes his father about his (Kagi's) personal situation and more generally about the civil war in Kansas Territory. Several thousand "armed Missourians" had been committing outrages against free state citizens with the support of proslave leaders--Wilson Shannon, Samuel Lecompte, and Daniel Woodson. Freestaters, according to Kagi, are just then mounting an effective defense of both Lawrence and Topeka, both primary targets of the proslavery forces.


Journal of the Council of the Territory of Kansas, 1855

Journal of the Council of the Territory of Kansas, 1855
Date: July 2 through August 30, 1855
This document identified the actions of the First Territorial Council (Senate), which first met at the town of Pawnee near Fort Riley on Monday July 2, 1855. On July 6, 1855, the House of Representatives approved a resolution sent to them by the Council that moved the meeting of the Legislature to the Shawnee Manual Labor School beginning July 16, 1855. This session of the Council concluded this first session on August 30, 1855. Included in the volume were various messages from the Governor and Acting Governor. The appendix contained reports of various committees--judiciary, special committee on exempting slaves from execution, bounds of counties and districts, elections, convention, public printing. The appendix also had the "opinion of the Supreme Court in regard to the legality of the present session" by Samuel Lecompte and Rush Elmore, a memorial from the legislature of Kansas to the President of the United States requesting the removal of Andrew Reeder, and the Rules and Orders under which the House of Representatives conducted business. The last fifty-two pages were an index to the volume. The members of the Council were: Thomas Johnson and Edward Chapman, 1st Council District; A. M. Coffey and David Lykins, 4th Council District; William Barbee, 5th Council District; John W. Forman, 7th district; William P. Richardson, 8th district; D. A. N. Grover, 9th district; L. J. Eastin and Richard R. Rees, 10th district. The elections in the 2nd, 3rd, and 6th Council Districts were disputed, but Andrew Macdonald, 2nd Council district, H. J. Strickler, 3rd district; and John Donaldson, 6th district, were sworn in as members of the Council. John A. Haldeman served as the Chief Clerk.


Journal of the House of Representatives of the Territory of Kansas

Journal of the House of Representatives of the Territory of Kansas
Creator: Kansas. Legislature
Date: July 2 through August 30, 1855
This printed document reported upon the actions of the First Territorial House of Representatives when it first met at the town of Pawnee near Fort Riley on Monday, July 2, 1855. On July 6, 1855, the House of Representatives approved a resolution sent to them by the Council (Senate) that moved the meeting of the Legislature to Shawnee Manual Labor School beginning July 16, 1855. This first session of the House of Representatives concluded on August 30, 1855. Included in the volume were various messages from the Governor and Acting Governor. The appendix contained reports of various committees--judiciary, a special committee on exempting slaves from execution, bounds of counties and districts, elections, convention, and public printing. The appendix also included the "opinion of the Supreme Court in regard to the legality of the present session" by Samuel Lecompte and Rush Elmore, a memorial from the legislature of Kansas to the President of the United States requesting the removal of Andrew Reeder, and the Rules and Orders under which the House of Representatives conducted business. The last 31 pages are an index to the volume.


Land Office, Kickapoo, Kansas Territory, notice

Land Office, Kickapoo, Kansas Territory, notice
Creator: United States. General Land Office
Date: June 12, 1858
Issued by John W. Whitfield, land office register and former proslavery territorial delegate to Congress, on June 12, 1858, this one-page notice informed Sol Miller of a counter claim made against some preemption land in which Miller (referred to as "an adverse claimant") apparently held an interest. The notice was also signed by Daniel Woodson, receiver, who had served as the first secretary of the territory of Kansas and on several occasions in 1855 and 1856 as acting governor.


Owen Brown to Mary Brown

Owen Brown to Mary Brown
Creator: Brown, Owen
Date: August 27, [1856]
On August 27, 1856, from Tabor, Iowa, Owen Brown wrote to tell his mother that according to all accounts "Father is the most daring courageous man in Kansas" and to relate other happenings in K.T. involving Jim Lane and Governor Shannon. Another invasion from Missouri was rumored, but free state recruits were assembling and "the Missourians are trembling in their Boots."


Territorial troubles correspondence, 1855-1856

Territorial troubles correspondence, 1855-1856
Date: 1855-1856
Correspondence relating to Kansas territorial troubles. Topics include interference with law enforcement and the movement of prisoners, reports of raids, and letters from militia leaders. Many of the documents are petitions from communities, including Leavenworth, Sugar Mound (now Mound City), Fort Scott, Westport, Council Grove, Pottawattamie, and Lawrence, seeking relief from robberies and harassment, and the protection of militia escorts. Petitions came from pro-slavery individuals as well, as evidenced by the September 23, 1856 letter written on behalf of citizens of Anderson and Coffey Counties being driven out by abolitionists. The antagonists in these letters include Colonel Whipple (also known as Aaron Dwight Stevens), Captain Frederick Emory, and Sterling Price. A proclamation by Governor Woodson, dated July 4, 1856, forbids the assembly of the "bogus legislature" in Topeka. Another proclamation, dated August 24, 1856, declares the territory to be in a state of open insurrection and rebellion. Other important events, such as the Pottawatomie Massacre and the Battle of Hickory Point, are also mentioned.


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