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People - Notable Kansans - Robinson, Sara T. L. (Tappan Lawrence), 1827-1911

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A history of Lawrence, Kansas: from the first settlement to the close of the rebellion

A history of Lawrence, Kansas: from the first settlement to the close of the rebellion
Creator: Cordley, Richard
Date: 1895
Sara Tappan Doolittle (Lawrence) Robinson, author of "Kansas: Its Interior and Exterior Life" and wife of Governor Charles Robinson, owned this copy of Richard Cordley's "A History of Lawrence Kansas." She heavily annotated the book in pencil, as did George Washington Brown (in ink). Brown was another prominent supporter of the Free State cause and an associate of the Robinsons. On page 269 Brown recommends that the author revise the earliest history, prior to Cordley's arrival in Lawrence, for accuracy. The book includes several maps and photographs, including a portrait of Sara Robinson between pages 168 and 169.


Amos A. Lawrence to Sara Robinson

Amos A. Lawrence to Sara Robinson
Creator: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: June 26, 1856
Amos A. Lawrence writes from New York to state that he believes "Gov. Robinson cannot be harmed by any action of law," but thinks it wise for Sara T. D. Robinson to write a letter to Lawrence's mother "to be kept in reserve." Lawrence included a draft version of that letter but it has not been digitized. Lawrence mentions visits with Congressmen William Howard and John Sherman (Howard Commission) and testimony before a congressional committee. He seems optimistic about the situation in Kansas. [Reprinted in Blackmar, "Life of Charles Robinson," 434.]


Biographical circulars

Biographical circulars
Date: 1890-1899
This collection consists of biographical forms sent by F. G. Adams, secretary of the Kansas Historical Society, to individuals whose names appeared in historically significant materials in the collections of the Kansas Historical Society. The responses are arranged alphabetically by last name. Biographical information may include full name, place and date of birth, place and date of settlement, present residence, place and date of death, official positions, and/or addresses of family members.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: May 15, 1860
A letter written by Charles Robinson, from Washington, D.C., to his wife, Sara Tappan Doolittle Robinson. He declares that Kansas will be admitted within a couple of weeks. Robinson mentions that Douglas made a powerful speech in the Senate annihilating Jefferson Davis. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 25, 1860
A letter written by Charles Robinson, from Boston, Massachusetts, to his wife, Sara Tappan Doolittle Robinson. He writes about attending Octoroon, a play about slavery, and his feelings for the "infernal institution of slavery." Robinson thinks the play conveys a true picture of conditions in the South. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 27, 1857
A letter written by Charles Robinson, from Rolmer depot near Boston, Massachusetts, to his wife, Sara Tappan Doolittle Robinson. A portion of the first page has been removed. The letter contains family and personal information. At one point in the letter, he asks for her forgiveness while he works to secure a free state for Kansas. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 22, 1861
A letter written by Charles Robinson, from St. Louis, Missouri, to his wife, Sara Tappan Doolittle Robinson. He writes about General Fremont taking to the field against Jackson, Price, and company. Because General Fremont is in the field, Robinson reports that he cannot leave and travel home. Also, he writes about looking for clothing for the Kansas regiments to protect them from the cold weather. A searchable, full-text version of this letter is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 20, 1860
Charles Robinson wrote several letters to his wife, Sara Robinson in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, as he traveled East in January, 1860. From the Astor House in New York, he writes on January 20th that Congress was not yet in session, and that everyone expects the Democrats to oppose Kansas admission. It is possible that Robinson could "be sent for as a witness in Harpers Ferry affair" (Congressional investigation/hearings).


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 11, 1861
From Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Robinson writes his wife Sara, who was still in the East, concerning Jim Lane's efforts to destroy Robinson's influence. The governor is not too worried, however, and writes that he could "by paying a little attention to the matter make him smell worse than ever. He and his friends are already beginning to falter in their course for fear that I will turn the tables on them which I can do with ease."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 13, 1857
This very personal letter from Charles Robinson in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Sara, who was visiting back East, touches on a number of things such as "keeping house on the hill," business and financial interests, and being "tired" of the turmoil in Kansas Territory. It also expresses a husband's longing for his wife to return.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 26, 1857
Charles Robinson wrote this letter to his wife, Sara, upon his return to Lawrence, Kansas Territory, from "a tour of ten days into the southern part of the Territory." This was a political trip, and he had been involved in another political meeting the previous night, but Robinson expressed his wish that he "was fairly clear of political affairs, but do not see how I can get out of them at present." He also mentioned the forthcoming legislative election (October, 1857) which he believed would be okay "unless there are great frauds."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: October 3, 1857
From Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Charles Robinson wrote to his wife, Sara, to finalize arrangements to meet her in St. Louis later in the month. He also mentioned a "Daniel Foster and Mr. Nute," and wrote that Foster was "mad with me & [Jim] Lane because he couldn't carry his policy in the Grasshopper Falls Convention."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: December 15, 1858
In this mostly personal note to his wife, Sara, from Washington, D.C., Charles Robinson briefly mentions the business ("Lawrence case") he had before "the Land Commission," and then complains about the infrequency of his correspondence from home.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 6, 1859
From Washington, D.C., Charles Robinson wrote his wife, Sara, back home in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, regarding land and railroad issues that he was working on behalf of in the capital. Robinson briefly addresses issues having to do with Indian land disputes, but focuses even more on the competition for railroads being fought out in Washington between Lawrence, Leavenworth, and Kansas City. ". . . Lawrence must fight its own battles . . . . I hope to be able to make Lawrence a point on both roads before we get through." [For more information on this battle over railroads, see I. E. Quastler, "Charting a Course: Lawrence, Kansas, and Its Railroad Strategy, 1854-1872," Kansas History 18 (Spring 1995): 18-33. For a time, civic and business leaders sought to make Lawrence the regional rail center with an aggressive promotion's plan, but they ultimately, and perhaps inevitably, lost the prize to Kansas City; this piece is largely drawn from the author's 1979 book-length study, "The Railroads of Lawrence."]


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 20, 1859
Mostly personal, this brief letter from Washington, D. C. to his wife, Sara, in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, announces Charles Robinson's impending departure from Washington and his intention to provide his wife with adequate domestic service in the future. But Robinson also mentions "our railroad bill" and the long awaited "Indian Commissioners decision probably on the float this week."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 20, 1856
From Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Charles Robinson updates his wife on developments in and around Lawrence since her departure. Governor John W. Geary had arrived and promises to see that the Missouri militia who were then threatening Lawrence "were disbanded." Robinson goes on to describe a very tense few days in September, beginning on Friday the 12th, involving militia of both sides and the governor. After a brief skirmish on the prairie east of Lawrence, Geary and some U.S. troops arrived and "the Missourians agreed to go home. It was all a farce. . . ."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: December 7, 1860
From Washington, D.C., on December 7, 1860, Charles Robinson writes his wife regarding the likelihood of secession and the government's response should this happen. He expects Kansas Territory to be admitted to the Union, perhaps as soon as some of the Southern states withdrew their members from the Senate. He also believes the chances were good that Congress would authorize payment of Kansas' claims against the government for damages--such payments would provide some help for those presently in need of relief assistance.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: December 19, 1860
On December 19, 1860, Charles Robinson writes to his wife from Washington, D.C., where he is lobbying members of Congress and other officials on behalf of Kansas and himself. Numerous Kansans, including Robinson, who is conducting a vigorous campaign for appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs, are seeking positions in the new administration. "Unless men lie beyond all comprehension," writes Robinson, "I don't see how I can fail of the appointment." Robinson did not receive this appointment.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 19, 1861
Charles Robinson, writing to his wife, Sara Robinson, in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, on January 19, 1861, is confident that things still looked good from him in Washington, D.C. Robinson mentions numerous men of political influence who he believes will be supportive and thus insure his appointment as Commissioner of Indian Affairs.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 29, 1856
Writing from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Charles Robinson writes to his wife, Sara Robinson, who was traveling East via Chicago, Illinois. After kidding her about how well-known she was becoming, he comments unfavorably on Governor John W. Geary, who "thinks he is awful smart & is getting rediculous fast." Robinson also mentions the forthcoming legislative election (October 6, 1856)--"We shall not vote."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: October 1, 1857
This is another personal letter from a tired and somewhat discouraged Charles Robinson in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Sara, who is apparently about ready to rejoin her husband in Lawrence, as he discusses meeting her in St. Louis. Robinson made reference to business affairs, including those in Quindaro, and curiously suggests that he was "about ready to go with Mr. Grover to South America" because he was "getting sick of this turmoil & strife."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: July 4, 1859
From Quindaro, Kansas Territory, Charles Robinson wrote to inform his wife, Sara, about matters of business pertaining to this young city on the Kaw River. He believed "railroad matters look[ed] very well for Quindaro," for example. Robinson also takes this opportunity to scold his wife about her attitude toward the people of Lawrence, some of whom she apparently thought were 'aristocratic or exclusive but I know of no one more exclusive than yourself; I do not know whether from pride of Character or circumstance or something else."


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: September 7, 1857
Charles Robinson, in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, writes this very personal letter to his wife, Sara Robinson, who was visiting family and friends back East. It briefly mentions the Quindaro land company business that was occupying some of Robinson's time and the fact that "political matters are comparatively quiet." Mainly, the "governor" just misses his wife and urges her to write soon and often.


Charles and Sarah Robinson correspondence

Charles and Sarah Robinson correspondence
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: 1861-1862
Correspondence between Charles Robinson, the first Governor of Kansas, his wife Sara, and others, mostly involving activities in the fight for a non-slavery Kansas. Some of the people discussed are Abraham Lincoln, James H. Lane, and Charles Jennison.


Draft letter, written by Amos Lawrence, for Sara Robinson

Draft letter, written by Amos Lawrence, for Sara Robinson
Creator: Lawrence, Amos Adams
Date: 1856
According to Frank W. Blackmar, who reprinted this document in the appendix of his book, "The Life of Charles Robinson" (1901), this is "a draft of a letter sent by Amos A. Lawrence to be re-written and signed by Mrs. Sara Robinson and addressed to Mrs. Lawrence, a relative of President Pierce and the mother of Amos A. Lawrence. Blackmar indicates that the letter, which concerns Charles Robinson's imprisonment (from May 10 to September 10, 1856) in Kansas Territory, was subsequently sent by Mrs. Lawrence to Mrs. Pierce, wife of the President, who gave it to President Pierce to read.


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