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Address to the Voters of Kansas

Address to the Voters of Kansas
Creator: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: September 25, 1867
The numerous authors of this pamphlet (Republicans) support the constitutional amendments to approve voting rights for blacks, for women, and to restrict voting rights to "loyal persons." They offer arguments for their position as well as criticizing the Democratic Party in Kansas for their opposition to these amendments. Forty five men signed the document, which was the result of a meeting in Lawrence. The following signed the document S. C. Pomeroy, Atchison; E. G. Ross, Lawrence; S. J. Crawford, Topeka; N. Green, Manhattan; Chas. Robinson, Lawrence; Geo T. Anthony, Leavenworth; Lewis Bodwell, Topeka; R. B. Taylor, editor Wyandotte Gazette; J. P. Root, Whandotte; James Rogers, Burlingame; S. Weaver, Editor Lecompton New Era; L. R. Elliott, Editor Atchison Daily Free Press; W. A. Starrett, Lawrence; Wm. Larimer, Jr., Leavenworth; John Ritchie, Topeka; John Ekin, Topeka; Sol. Miller, Editor White Cloud Chief; A. H. Foote, Lawrence; C. B. Lines, Wabaunsee; R. G. Elliott, Jefferson county; G. A. Crawford, Bourbon county; John Speer, Kansas Tribune; A. Low, Doniphan; R. W. Jenkins, Pottawatomie county; Ed. Russell, Leavenworth; J. H. Pillsbury, Editor Manhattan Independent; S. D. Houston, Manhattan; W. K. Marshall, Atchison; F. G. Adams, Kennekuk; P. L. Hubbard, Atchison; A. Hunting, Manhattan; J. B. Abbott, De Soto; Joseph Denison, Manhattan; T. H. Baker, Manhattan, H. W. Farnsworth, Topeka; I. H. Smith, Topeka; D. R. Anthony, Leavenworth; G. W. Higginbotham, Manhattan; John Pipher, Manhattan, R. L. Harford, Manhattan; Jas. Humphrey, Manhattan; Wm McKay, Manhattan; R. P. Duvall, Manhattan; Pardee Butler, Pardee; and L. F. Green, Baldwin City. Only the language restricting voting to "loyal" persons was passed in the election on November 5, 1867. Blacks and women were not given voting rights as a result of the 1867 election.


An appeal from Kansas!

An appeal from Kansas!
Creator: Parrott, Marcus J., 1828-1879
Date: December 14, 1860
This circular describes the beginnings of the Territorial Executive Committee, which was in charge of collecting relief to aid the struggling settlers of Kansas Territory during the 1860 drought. This committee met in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, on November 14, 1860, and passed several resolutions. From one hundred and one delegates were present from twenty-four Kansas counties. Out of this number, four men, including Samuel Pomeroy, were elected officers. The circular concludes with "Suggestions and Directions to those who purpose Aiding us in our Distress."


Anonymous to Samuel C. Pomeroy

Anonymous to Samuel C. Pomeroy
Date: May 14, 1855
The author of this lengthy letter chose not to sign his name but offers his observations about Kansas affairs "which may or may not be of service to you." In essence, the correspondent offers a free stater's perspective--not an abolitionist one--on the "modus operandi" of the pro-slave party for Kansas Territory. Slavery, or the slave system, means "despotism" to this individual, and he believes "pro slavery men will use every means" to control the territory, which would soon go to free state "if the contest were a fair and even one." The author declares it critical that Americans elect a president in 1856 who would "do right, a man who loves the Union the whole Union as it is . . . ."


Appeal for the Kansas sufferers!

Appeal for the Kansas sufferers!
Creator: Foster, Daniel, 1816-1864
Date: 1860
This pamphlet, written by Daniel Foster, general agent of the New England Kansas Relief Committee, attempts to dispel any doubts about the severity of the nine-month drought in Kansas Territory. Many settlers had left Kansas Territory, and those remaining needed relief. Foster calls on people to provide aid to those in Kansas by contributing money or goods. The pamphlet lists names of people serving on a Boston committee who had met to discuss relief efforts in Kansas, including such well-known individuals as John A. Andrew, George Luther Stearns, Samuel Gridley Howe, and Thomas H. Webb.


Atchison and St. Joseph Railroad Company stockholders' meeting

Atchison and St. Joseph Railroad Company stockholders' meeting
Creator: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: July 28, 1857
This advertisement, issued by company president S. C. Pomeroy, announces a meeting of the Atchison and St. Joseph Railroad Company's stockholders on August 8, 1857, in Atchison, Kansas Territory. The meeting is called to elect a new board of directors and officers.


Atchison land sale between Samuel Pomeroy and Theodore Hyatt

Atchison land sale between Samuel Pomeroy and Theodore Hyatt
Date: June 29, 1857
"This agreement made this 29th day of June 1857 Between Samuel C. Pomeroy of the City of Atchison Kansas Territory. . .and Theodore Hyatt of the City of New York" addresses the sale of certain portions of city lots in Atchison and other land to the latter, as well as "one half of said Pomeroy's interest in the Squatter Sovereign," etc. Pomeroy received several thousand dollars in this exchange.


Charles Robinson to Edward Everett Hale

Charles Robinson to Edward Everett Hale
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: April 7, 1857
Charles Robinson wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Robinson complained about the lack of respect he had received from New England Emigrant Aid Company leaders. He was particularly upset about criticisms of his financial ability. Robinson expressed anger at what he perceived as Eli Thayer's and the New England Emigrant Aid Company's opposition to the development of the town of Quindaro. Robinson included excerpts from a letter he received from James Redpath outlining Thayer's criticisms of Robinson's involvement with Quindaro.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: January 11, 1861
From Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Robinson writes his wife Sara, who was still in the East, concerning Jim Lane's efforts to destroy Robinson's influence. The governor is not too worried, however, and writes that he could "by paying a little attention to the matter make him smell worse than ever. He and his friends are already beginning to falter in their course for fear that I will turn the tables on them which I can do with ease."


Documents relating to the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad Company, volume 1

Documents relating to the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad Company, volume 1
Creator: Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railroad Company
Date: July 1, 1890
This volume contains land grants, statutory powers and judicial interpretations, issues of capital stock, leases, purchases, mortgages, indentures of trust securing the bonds of the company, and the act incorporating the ATSF Railroad Company. The latter, which appears on pages 3-8, was passed at the fifth session the Legislative Assembly of Kansas Territory in 1859. It was classified as part of the "private laws of the Territory of Kansas." The act was signed by Governor Samuel Medary. The law listed the following as incorporators: S. C. Pomeroy, C. K. Holliday, Luther C. Challis, Peter T. Abell, Milton C. Dickey, Asaph Allen, Samuel Dickson, Nelson L. Gordon, George S. Hillyer, Lorenso D. Bird, Jeremiah Murphy, George H. Fairchild, and R. L. Crane. Volume one, part of a three volume set, was compiled by Henry W. Swift for the A. T. & S. F. in 1890 at the request of John J. McCook, General Counsel, and George R. Peck, General Solicitor, for the railroad company.


Dunn to Thomas W. Higginson

Dunn to Thomas W. Higginson
Date: October 23, 1856
In this letter to Reverend Thomas W. Higginson, who was an agent of the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee, Mr. Dunn writes from Oskaloosa, Iowa, about his attempts to gather together a company of men as a response to Gov. Gary's [sic] election and the U. S. Army's efforts to arrest many prominent free state men. According to the author, "the U. S. troops by the order of Gary [sic] are taking every free State man they can get hold of." He is eager to hear advice from Higginson about the best way to proceed, and he lays out his plan to amass about 60 men to fight against the border ruffians who have invaded the territory. He hopes that Higginson would support him in this matter by obtaining provisions. Dunn maintains that this plan comes from his sense of duty; it does not arise from a warlike spirit.


Edmund G. Ross correspondence

Edmund G. Ross correspondence
Date: 1856-1865
Correspondence to and from Edmund G. Ross. A number of letters are from Ross to his wife Fannie Lathrop Ross. There is one letter from S. C. Pomeroy about Ross's request to raise a company of men. There are also a number of telegrams relating to military activities. During the Civil War Ross served in Company E of the 11th Kansas Cavalry. In 1866 he was appointed by the governor to fill the unexpired United States Senate term of James Lane, who had committed suicide. Ross served in the Senate until 1871. Transcriptions of some of the letters are included with the images of the originals.


G. Stockmyer, Starving Kansas

G. Stockmyer, Starving Kansas
Creator: Stockmyer, G
Date: December, 1860
This broadside was prepared by G. Stockmyer, agent for Kansas Relief. It included descriptions of the conditions in most parts of Kansas Territory from individuals such as Thaddeus Hyatt, Allen Hodgson, and W. F. M. Arny and excerpts from various newspapers. Relief efforts were being coordinated by Samuel C. Pomeroy from Atchison, Kansas Territory. Freight and railroad companies provided free shipping for relief goods sent to K. T.


Henry L. Denison to Joseph Denison

Henry L. Denison to Joseph Denison
Creator: Denison, Henry
Date: May 11, 1859
Henry Denison wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to his uncle, Joseph Denison, who was traveling away from home. Henry reported that the cornerstone of Bluemont College had been laid the day before, and described the festivities, including speeches and the planting of a kind of time capsule behind the cornerstone. He added that crops had sprouted and were growing beautifully; emigrants continued to pass through on their way to Pikes Peak.


Hiram Hill to Dear Brother

Hiram Hill to Dear Brother
Creator: Hill, Hiram, 1804-
Date: May 13, 1855
After arriving in Kansas City by steamboat, Hiram Hill wrote to his brother. En route, four men had died of cholera while others continued to drink and play cards nearby. Disease fatalities were common, Hill reported. He speculated that the river water, which passengers drank, was contaminated with disease from the rich prairie soil. Hill described life at the Winedot [sic] Indian Reservation (beginning at the bottom of page 2) where he met the "prinsable chiefe" and saw the governor's sister. Hill related news concerning Mr. Putnam, Mr. Tomas, Mr. Gague, Mr. Jay, Mr. Partridge, Mr. Whitman, Mr. Pomeroy, Mr. Fuller and others. He was skeptical that these men would permanently settle in Kansas Territory. Hill also described Kansas City, which he thought would improve under "yankee," rather than "slave holder," management. (Hill's final destination was Lawrence, where he acquired town lots through quit claims not included in this online project.)


Hiram Hill to Dear Brother

Hiram Hill to Dear Brother
Creator: Hill, Hiram, 1804-
Date: December 7, 1855
Hiram Hill, a resident of Williamsburgh, Massachusetts en route to Kansas City and ultimately to Lawrence, Kansas Territory, wrote from Richmond, Missouri to his brother. He relayed the murder of an unnamed free state man (likely Charles W. Dow), the gathering of 1,100 free state and 800 proslavery men at Lawrence, and other Wakarusa War events. Hill, a free state supporter, felt that the information he received from Missourians was inaccurate or exaggerated. He doubted reports that 60 proslavery men had been killed at Lawrence, or of abolitionists driving proslavery settlers from their homes. Hill reported the arrests of free state men including Judge Johnson and General Pomeroy, who he heard had escaped.


Hiram Hill to Dear Wife

Hiram Hill to Dear Wife
Creator: Hill, Hiram, 1804-
Date: November 26, 1855
Hiram Hill, a resident of Williamsburgh, Massachusetts wrote to his wife from St. Louis, Missouri, on his way to Lawrence, Kansas Territory, where he owned property. Hill had traveled by railroad and boat and was now a passenger on the steamboat Senora. Ticket prices were high due to the late season. Also on board were Erastus D. Ladd, who was elected to the Topeka free state legislature on March 30th, and Thaddeus L. Whitney, a friend and business associate. Hill also mentioned Mr. Pom[e]roy and Mr. Eldridge. Interestingly, a second letter dated December 20 and perhaps from Hill's wife to her sister-in-law (the wife of Hiram's brother Otis) was written on a blank page.


Hiram Hill to Dear Wife

Hiram Hill to Dear Wife
Creator: Hill, Hiram, 1804-
Date: December 8, 1855 - December 9, 1855
Hiram Hill wrote from Westport, Missouri to his wife as he received new information concerning the Wakarusa War at Lawrence. Hill was frustrated by these reports, which conflicted and were from the proslavery perspective, and which concerned the number of free state and proslavery soldiers, the status of the war, and government action taken to prevent conflict. Hill was also troubled by shameless "traveling and drinking and swearing" and gunshots on the Sabbath. The last page of the letter expresses his relief at news of peace in Lawrence, where he would learn "the other syde of the story" upon arrival. The murder of Thomas W. Barber, who rode outside Lawrence and was shot by a proslavery supporter on December 6th, was mentioned. Hill also described an eventful stagecoach journey.


Invitation to a Grand Celebration in Atchison City

Invitation to a Grand Celebration in Atchison City
Creator: Atchison Committee on Invitations
Date: June 13, 1860
An invitation extended by the citizens of Atchison, Kansas Territory, to attend a celebration of the "extension of the Hannibal and St. Joseph Railroad" to Atchison, and to witness the ground-breaking ceremony for the Atchison and Pike's Peak Railroad. The invitation entitled the bearer to a free pass on various railroads for travel to Atchison.


Isaac Tichenor Goodnow diary

Isaac Tichenor Goodnow diary
Creator: Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894
Date: July 1855 - January 1856
Isaac Goodnow, a free state supporter and founder of Bluemont College in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, recorded news of political events and military skirmishes from July, 1855, through January, 1856. Goodnow's diary makes mention of the details of his daily life, such as home maintenance, crop harvests, prairie fires, an extended illness, and encounters with Native Americans.


James Gillpatrick to Samuel C. Pomeroy

James Gillpatrick to Samuel C. Pomeroy
Creator: Gillpatrick, James
Date: October 24, 1856
From Brownville, Kansas Territory, Gillpatrick writes seeking compensation for his losses to the "border ruffins" or, specifically, at the hand of "a miserable horse thief from Missouri." Gillpatrick had been advised by a Chicago friend that all such aid was being distributed through the Lawrence-based committee, thus his letter to Pomeroy, who would "doubtless know who they are."


John A. Martin to J. M. Winchell

John A. Martin to J. M. Winchell
Date: September 7, 1859
In the weeks following the close of the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, John A. Martin, the convention's secretary, and James M. Winchell, president of the convention, were occupied with the campaign for its ratification. This letter from Martin, dated Atchison, September 7, 1859, addressed some of the steps that had been and should be taken in the document's behalf during the bitter, partisan campaign leading up to the October 4, 1859, referendum.


John Brown to Mary Brown and family

John Brown to Mary Brown and family
Creator: Brown, John, 1800-1859
Date: December 16, 1855
Soon after his return from Lawrence, where he and other volunteers had successfully defended that place, John Brown wrote from Osawatomie to give his family "a brief account of the invasion," the so-called Wakarusa War. As it turned out, Brown provided some interesting details about their preparations and arrival in the besieged city and the negotiations that were ongoing when the Browns came on the scene. The Free State leaders, according to Brown, skillfully accomplished and signed an agreement with Governor Shannon that was "much to their own liking."


John M. S. Williams to Theodore Hyatt

John M. S. Williams to Theodore Hyatt
Creator: Williams, J.M.S
Date: November 22, 1859
Williams, an official of the Emigrant Aid Company, writes to Theodore Hyatt of New York from the offices of Glidden & Williams (California Packet Office) in Boston, regarding the payment of "$2500 for some lots . . ." which was to cover a note Williams had accepted from S. C. Pomeroy. Williams also comments on Kansas Territory politics: "I have been trying to raise $1000, to help Mr. Pomeroy in the Election (December 6?), his chance for the U S Senate, being very good; but he needs a little pecuniary assistance . . ." Pomeroy's election is declared critical because "he will have great influence on the course of the future Rail Road in Kansas . . . ."


Joseph Denison to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Joseph Denison to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow
Creator: Denison, Joseph, 1815-1900
Date: May 6, 1857
Joseph Denison wrote from Parkville, Missouri, to Isaac Goodnow, who was traveling . Denison reported that his solicitations for support of a college in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, had recently been well received. Among the interested parties were C. Evans and P. Judson of Evanstan, Illinois, who had been successful in building up Northwestern University in that area. Samuel Pomeroy also conveyed his interest, having pledged an investment to the cause on behalf of the New England Emigrant Aid Company.


Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence

Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence
Creator: Kansas. Adjutant General's Office
Date: 1868
This correspondence received by the Adjutant General's Office, headed by Josiah B. McAfee, discusses a variety of topics including the burial places of deceased Kansas soldiers, requests for recruiting commissions to raise a company of militiamen, and "Price's Raid Claims." There is frequent correspondence with Philip M. Sheridan, in command of the Missouri Department in Fort Hays, and letters from concerned citizens of Sibley, Kansas, worried that Indian presence and shrinking provisions are forcing people to leave the area.


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