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Winter 1977, Volume 43, Number 4

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Andrew H. Reeder to John A. Haldeman

Andrew H. Reeder to John A. Haldeman
Creator: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: August 11, 1856
In this letter to John A. Haldeman, Andrew H. Reeder discusses the "sacking of Lawrence," the loss of papers related to the sale on lands that once belonged to Indians, and the use of Haldeman as his agent for his lots in Leavenworth, Kansas. As Reeder's letter indicates, the transition of Indian lands into the hands of white settlers was often quite difficult and added to tension levels in Kansas in the wake of the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854.


Andrew H. Reeder to John A. Halderman

Andrew H. Reeder to John A. Halderman
Creator: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: August 11, 1856
The former governor writes this letter from Easton, Pennsylvania, to his former secretary and attorney, John A. Halderman, in order to secure Halderman's services to retrieve some personal papers and settle some matters of business pertaining to town lots and shares. According to Reeder, "the Sheriff posse at the sacking of Lawrence broke open my trunk and stole the contents. The clothing is probably by this time worn out," and he is not concerned about other contents, with the exception of "some private papers" that someone had informed him could be retrieved. He asks Halderman to get the papers, which included "certificates of stock in Leavenworth, Tecumseh, Lecompton, Lawrence, Easton, Pawnee" etc., and then take care of business matters that are reflected therein. Reeder also asks Halderman "to attend to my Leavenworth lots" and explains in considerable detail about these matters.


Annals of Kansas, January - February, 1855

Annals of Kansas, January - February, 1855
Creator: Wilder, Daniel Webster, 1832-1911
Date: January, 1855 through February, 1855
D. W. Wilder's "Annals of Kansas," published in 1886, provides a day-by-day chronicle of significant events in Kansas. These are digital images of Annals of Kansas entries for the territorial period of 1854-1861.


Arthur Capper, Ben Paulin, Charles Curtis, and Carl R. Gray at Pawnee Capitol, Pawnee, Kansas

Arthur Capper, Ben Paulin, Charles Curtis, and Carl R. Gray at Pawnee Capitol, Pawnee, Kansas
Date: August 1, 1928
This photograph shows Senator Arthur Capper, Kansas Governor Ben Paulin, Vice President Charles Curtis, and Carl R. Gray standing from left to right while visiting the Pawnee Capitol in Pawnee, Kansas on August 1, 1928. The men visited the Pawnee Capitol, commonly referred to as the First Territorial Capitol at Fort Riley, when Senator Capper was visiting Kansas. The First Territorial Capitol was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.


Benjamin S. Paulen and Charles Curtis, Pawnee, Kansas

Benjamin S. Paulen and Charles Curtis, Pawnee, Kansas
Creator: Holt, O.W.
Date: August 1, 1928
This sepia colored photograph shows Kansas Governor Benjamin S. Paulen shaking hands with members from the Osawatomie tribe at the dedication ceremony for the restoration of the state's first territorial capitol in Pawnee, Kansas. Standing in the middle watching the handshake is United States Senator from Kansas, Charles Curtis.


Building in which first Kansas legislature met

Building in which first Kansas legislature met
Date: October 12, 1907
This article from the Wichita Daily Beacon was calling for the restoration of the building where the first Territorial Kansas Legislature met. The First Territorial Capitol was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.


Dedication of reconstructed first capitol of Kansas

Dedication of reconstructed first capitol of Kansas
Date: August 1, 1928
This poster lists "Low Fares to Pawnee and Ft. Riley, Kas. For the Dedication of Reconstructed First Capitol of Kansas." The Union Pacific Railroad paid for the restoration of the building and sponsored special trains to the event. The First Territorial Capitol was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.


First Territorial Capitol, Pawnee, Kansas

First Territorial Capitol, Pawnee, Kansas
Date: Between 1925 and 1935
This is an exterior view of the First Territorial Capitol, Pawnee, Kansas. The photograph was taken after the restoration of the building by the Union Pacific Railroad. The First Territorial Capitol was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.


First Territorial Capitol in Pawnee, Kansas

First Territorial Capitol in Pawnee, Kansas
Date: Between 1930 and 1935
Here are two photographs showing exterior views of the First Territorial Capitol in Pawnee, Kansas. The photograph was taken after the restoration of the building by the Union Pacific Railroad.


First Territorial Capitol of Kansas restoration ceremony

First Territorial Capitol of Kansas restoration ceremony
Date: August 1, 1928
This is an invitation to the ceremonies following the completion of the restoration of the First Territorial Capitol at Fort Riley, Kansas. The Union Pacific Railroad paid for the restoration and sponsored special trains to the event. The First Territorial Capitol was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.


First capitol of Kansas

First capitol of Kansas
Date: November 27, 1900
This article, published in The Industrialist, describes the history of the first territorial legislature which met with 28 pro-slavery and 11 free-state men. It urges that the building be preserved. The First Territorial Capitol was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.


George W. Knapp to George W. Martin

George W. Knapp to George W. Martin
Date: Between 1896 and 1908
These two letters written by Geo. W. Knapp contain his observations on the construction of the First Territorial Capitol building in Ft. Riley, Kansas, which was originally a warehouse. Both letters were addressed to Geo. W. Martin, one dated 1896 and the other in 1908. Martin was head of the Kansas State Historical Society. The First Territorial Capitol was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.


John N. Dyer to Andrew H. Reeder

John N. Dyer to Andrew H. Reeder
Creator: Dyer, John N.
Date: November 7, 1854
John N. Dyer of Pawnee, Kansas Territory, writes Governor Reeder to say that the Pawnee Town Association, which had been formed in November, 1854, and of which Dyer was secretary, had voted to admit the governor "as a member with equal rights, and responsibilities, as the original members." The letter, written on the 7th, describes a meeting on the 6th of November; perhaps the association's first meeting, since they reportedly organized sometime in November.


Journal of the Council of the Territory of Kansas, 1855

Journal of the Council of the Territory of Kansas, 1855
Date: July 2 through August 30, 1855
This document identified the actions of the First Territorial Council (Senate), which first met at the town of Pawnee near Fort Riley on Monday July 2, 1855. On July 6, 1855, the House of Representatives approved a resolution sent to them by the Council that moved the meeting of the Legislature to the Shawnee Manual Labor School beginning July 16, 1855. This session of the Council concluded this first session on August 30, 1855. Included in the volume were various messages from the Governor and Acting Governor. The appendix contained reports of various committees--judiciary, special committee on exempting slaves from execution, bounds of counties and districts, elections, convention, public printing. The appendix also had the "opinion of the Supreme Court in regard to the legality of the present session" by Samuel Lecompte and Rush Elmore, a memorial from the legislature of Kansas to the President of the United States requesting the removal of Andrew Reeder, and the Rules and Orders under which the House of Representatives conducted business. The last fifty-two pages were an index to the volume. The members of the Council were: Thomas Johnson and Edward Chapman, 1st Council District; A. M. Coffey and David Lykins, 4th Council District; William Barbee, 5th Council District; John W. Forman, 7th district; William P. Richardson, 8th district; D. A. N. Grover, 9th district; L. J. Eastin and Richard R. Rees, 10th district. The elections in the 2nd, 3rd, and 6th Council Districts were disputed, but Andrew Macdonald, 2nd Council district, H. J. Strickler, 3rd district; and John Donaldson, 6th district, were sworn in as members of the Council. John A. Haldeman served as the Chief Clerk.


Journal of the House of Representatives of the Territory of Kansas

Journal of the House of Representatives of the Territory of Kansas
Creator: Kansas. Legislature
Date: July 2 through August 30, 1855
This printed document reported upon the actions of the First Territorial House of Representatives when it first met at the town of Pawnee near Fort Riley on Monday, July 2, 1855. On July 6, 1855, the House of Representatives approved a resolution sent to them by the Council (Senate) that moved the meeting of the Legislature to Shawnee Manual Labor School beginning July 16, 1855. This first session of the House of Representatives concluded on August 30, 1855. Included in the volume were various messages from the Governor and Acting Governor. The appendix contained reports of various committees--judiciary, a special committee on exempting slaves from execution, bounds of counties and districts, elections, convention, and public printing. The appendix also included the "opinion of the Supreme Court in regard to the legality of the present session" by Samuel Lecompte and Rush Elmore, a memorial from the legislature of Kansas to the President of the United States requesting the removal of Andrew Reeder, and the Rules and Orders under which the House of Representatives conducted business. The last 31 pages are an index to the volume.


Kansas Legislature meeting at First Territorial Capitol, Fort Riley, Kansas

Kansas Legislature meeting at First Territorial Capitol, Fort Riley, Kansas
Creator: Kansas. Centennial Commission
Date: February 22, 1961
Twelve photographs of the Kansas Legislature meeting at the First Territorial Capitol in Fort Riley, Kansas. The event was part of the Kansas Centennial celebration. The First Territorial Capitol was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.


Kansas centennial ceremony

Kansas centennial ceremony
Date: 1961
This silent film includes footage of Kansas centennial festivities from across the state. The footage includes Kansas Governor John Anderson, Jr. at a flag raising ceremony; a marching band in a football stadium; Dodge City and Santa Fe Trail reenactors; the first Territorial capitol at Pawnee; a parade; airplanes; and Fort Larned.


Memoranda of Stock in Towns

Memoranda of Stock in Towns
Creator: Reeder, Andrew H. (Andrew Horatio), 1807-1864
Date: [1855]
This document was an undated "Mem. Of Stock in Towns," which appeared to have been written in longhand by Reeder himself and included the number of shares he had purchased (and how they were acquired) in fifteen different towns: Leavenworth, Pawnee, Tecumseh, Marysville, Lecompton, Montgomery (Dickinson Co.), Reeder (Dickinson Co.), Richmond, Whitfield (Shawnee Co.), Topeka, Douglas, Omaha City, Chetolah (Davis/Geary Co.), Grasshopper Falls, and Easton. Interestingly, he held thirty-four shares in Pawnee, his most famous (or infamous) investment venture, but he had thirty-six shares in Montgomery, twenty in Douglas and there appears to be a good number in Omaha City.


Nebraska and Kanzas

Nebraska and Kanzas
Creator: J. H. Colton & Co.,
Date: 1855
The map, published in 1855, showed the eastern portions of both Kansas and Nebraska. The Nebraska portion depicts the counties that had been established at that time. The Kansas portion included cities, various Indian reservations, and rivers.


Old Pawnee Capitol

Old Pawnee Capitol
Date: 1928
"An account of the First Capitol Building of Kansas, the town of Pawnee, Initial sessions of the First Territorial Legislature, destruction of the town of Pawnee, ruins of the Capitol building, restoration of the Capitol building, dedication ceremonies August 1, 1928." The First Territorial Capitol was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1970.


Pawnee Association Town share certificate

Pawnee Association Town share certificate
Creator: Pawnee Town Association
Date: July 21, 1855
The Pawnee Association issued this certificate for "one share of the town property" to Thomas Sherwood, a business associate of Kansas Territory governor Andrew Reeder. Sherwood was involved in many of Reeder's land and town share transactions. This printed certificate is more elaborate than the ones issued earlier in the year.


Pawnee Association, town share certificate

Pawnee Association, town share certificate
Creator: Pawnee Town Association
Date: December 20, 1854
This printed certificate for "one share" in the Pawnee Association is made out to Thomas Sherwood and signed by W. R. Montgomery, president, and William A. Hammond, secretary. William R. Montgomery was a colonel in the U.S. Army in command at Fort Riley, Kansas Territory, at the time; Hammond was the post surgeon.


Pawnee, Kansas Territority

Pawnee, Kansas Territority
Date: March 12, 1855
This black and white photograph shows a broadside advertising the public sale of lots in the territory town of Pawnee, Kansas. Pawnee, adjacent to Fort Riley, Davis County (later Geary County), was a town organized during the territorial period. It served at the territorial capitol for only four days in 1855. During the summer of 1855, members of the Kansas territorial legislature journeyed to the town of Pawnee to attend the first session on July 2 called by Governor Andrew H. Reeder. When they arrived, however, they were dismayed to find that the stone structure that was to serve as the first territorial capitol was far from ready. On July 4 the legislature passed a bill providing for the temporary establishment of the capital at the Shawnee Methodist Mission. Two days later the governor vetoed it on the grounds that the legislature had overstepped the authority conferred upon it by Congress. Both houses, however, promptly passed the bill over his veto and then adjourned to meet at Shawnee Mission on July 16.


Samuel Tappan to Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow

Samuel Tappan to Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow
Creator: Tappan, S. F. (Samuel Forster), d. 1913
Date: June 29, 1855
Samuel Tappan wrote from Barker's Mission on the Shawnee Reserve in present-day Johnson County, Kansas Territory, to Ellen Goodnow, Isaac Goodnow's wife, near Manhattan. Tappan updated Ellen on the status of some misplaced luggage, providing a good description of local shipping and travel procedures. He praised the land of Kansas, " a glorious country to try 'men's soles' (sic)". Tappan also described the recent scuffle between Governor Reeder and Benjamin Stringfellow, an incident which embodied the tension between anti and proslavery supporters.


Star 34

Star 34
Creator: Kansas. Industrial Development Commission
Date: 1954
The Kansas Industrial Development Commission produced this film promoting the history and cultural of the state of Kansas. The film highlights the State capitol in Topeka; the John Steuart Curry murals; John Brown's cabin in Osawatomie; Boot Hill cemetery in Dodge City; rodeos; American Indians; sod houses; Council Oak and Post Office Oak in Council Grove; Spirit (Waconda) Springs in Cawker City; the "Home on the Range" (Brewster Higley) cabin in Athol, Smith County; Pony Express stations; the Beecher bible and rifle church near Wamego; the First Territorial Capitol in Pawnee; the wheat industry; the oil and gas industries; coal and salt mining; the aviation industry in Wichita; the Eisenhower Presidential Library in Abilene; Lost Canyon (including Cobra Rock, Sphinx Rock, Castle Rock, Towering Cliffs, and Monument Rock) near Quinter; lakes; the state fair; cattle and livestock; buffalo; the geographic center of the contiguous United States monument near Lebanon; and Coronado Heights near Lindsborg.


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