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Abraham Lincoln to Mark W. Delahay

Abraham Lincoln to Mark W. Delahay
Creator: Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865
Date: May 14, 1859
Lincoln regretfully declines an invitation to attend the Osawatomie convention on May 18, 1859, which was to formally organize the Republican Party in Kansas. Lincoln warns against "the temptation to lower the Republican Standard [in whatever platform the convention might adopt] in order to gather recruits. "In my judgment," Lincoln continues, "such a step would be a serious mistake" that "would surrender the object of the Republican organization-- preventing the Spread and Nationalization of Slavery." This two-page, handwritten copy of a letter sent by Abraham Lincoln to Mark Delahay was probably given to the Kansas Historical Society by Delahay's daughter, Mary E. Delahay, in the early 1900s.


Abstract of census returns

Abstract of census returns
Creator: Undersigned Citizens of Kansas Territory, John Stroup (first signature),
Date: 1859
This 1859 abstract of census returns shows information at the township level for most Kansas counties. Some counties are listed without data. The census lists the number of voters in three different ways--the number of votes cast June 7, 1859; number of voters on June 7, 1859 who were under 6 month provision; and number of voters under 3 month provision. It also lists the number of inhabitants. The election on June 7, 1859, was to elect delegates to the Wyandotte constitutional convention.


Amelia Josephine Labedia to James W. Denver

Amelia Josephine Labedia to James W. Denver
Creator: Labedia, Amelia Josephine
Date: March 8, 1857
Amelia Labedia, a Native American from one of the New York Indian tribes, wrote this letter of complaint to James W. Denver, Commissioner of Indian Affairs. She was angered by white squatters who mistreated these native tribes by burning down their houses, ransacking their fields, and driving them off their land. White settlers had no legal claim to these lands, but they settled on them nevertheless. The New York Indian tribes--which consisted of the Seneca, Onodaga, Cayuga, Tuscarora, Oneida, St. Regis, Stockbridge, Munsee, and Brothertown nations--had been given land in Kansas Territory according to the treaty of 1838.


Annual Report to the American Missionary Association

Annual Report to the American Missionary Association
Creator: Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898
Date: 1858
This draft report, written by Samuel L. Adair, covers the year 1857 and also describes the organization of the Congregational Church in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Samuel L. Adair was preaching at a number of rural churches in the area. It reports on membership, attendance, and other religious activities. He also mentions the activities of other denominations in the area.


Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair

Barstow Darrach to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Darrach, Barstow
Date: April 20, 1857
Barstow Darrach, a doctor at New York Hospital, wrote Adair that he was encouraged by the results of the recent Leavenworth election, and that he had authorized a Mr. Tator to settle his affairs in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Darrach also discussed the slave oligarchy and indications that St. Louis was opposed to slavery. He cited several events that he felt indicated the free state cause was progressing.


C. G. Allen's response to Redpath and Hinton's call for information about John Brown

C. G. Allen's response to Redpath and Hinton's call for information about John Brown
Creator: Allen, C. G.
Date: December, 1859
Allen, a "minister of the Gospel" at Cottonwood Falls, Kansas Territory, writes in response to James Redpath's and R. J. Hinton's call for "anecdotes & reminiscences" concerning "the brave & philanthropic [John] Brown," who the preacher first met in 1856 in Lawrence, Kansas. Allen left Lawrence when a call came for volunteers to aid in the defense of Osawatomie, Kansas, in August of that year. While there engaged, he saw his first "Border Ruffians," whom he described as "miserable specimens of humanity. They were ragged & dirty. Their cloths & faces were to a considerable extent covered with tobacco spit." Allen and the men with whom he traveled missed the Battle of Osawatomie by moving south before the attack in an effort to find the attackers before they reached the town.


Charles E. Griffith to James Montgomery

Charles E. Griffith to James Montgomery
Creator: Griffith, Charles E.
Date: November 15, 1859
Charles Griffith, an Osawatomie newspaper publisher writing from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, writes Captain James Montgomery that he believes voting fraud has occurred in the November 8, 1859, territorial legislature election. Griffith claims that, in the absence of the fraud, Montgomery would have won a seat in the territorial house of representatives.


Charles Stores Adair

Charles Stores Adair
Creator: J. P. Marshall & Co.
Date: 1862
Charles Stores Adair was the son of Samuel Lyle and Florella Brown Adair. They lived near Osawatomie in Lykins County, Kansas Territory.


Cotillon Party

Cotillon Party
This invitation was for a party to be held at William Chestnut's house in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory on December 30, 1858


Ephraim Huested, petition for payment of claim

Ephraim Huested, petition for payment of claim
Creator: Huested, Ephraim
Date: July 21, 1859
This petition by Ephraim Huested was addressed to "the honorable Board of Commissioners appointed to audit claims." During the warfare of 1856, Mr. Huested had a horse stolen by a group of Georgians who were camped near Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Mr. Huested had never received any sort of compensation, so he now requested 150 dollars for his loss. The document also contained a footnote by Nelson J. Roscoe, justice of the peace, who verified the legitimacy of the petition.


First Annual Fair of the Lykins County Agricultural Society

First Annual Fair of the Lykins County Agricultural Society
Creator: Lykins County Agricultural Society
Date: September 26, 1860-September 27, 1860
This poster provides the information about First Annual Fair of the Lykins County Agricultural Society, which was held at Paola on September 26th and 27th, 1860. It lists the fair officers, the rules under which the competition will occur, and the various classes in which items may be entered.


Florella Brown Adair

Florella Brown Adair
Creator: Snyder & Steinhoff
Date: 1862
Florella Brown Adair was the wife of Samuel Lyle Adair and the half-sister of abolitionist, John Brown. She settled near Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, with her husband, who was a Congregational minister. She and her husband were free state supporters. The identification on the photograph indicates it is an enlargement of a small photograph taken in 1862.


Florella Brown Adair

Florella Brown Adair
Florella Brown Adair was the wife of Reverend Samuel Lyle Adair and the half sister of abolitionist John Brown. She settled near Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, with her husband, who was a Congregational minister. She and her husband were active free state supporters.


Gamaliel Garrison to Samuel L. Adair

Gamaliel Garrison to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Garrison, Gamaliel
Date: Probably December 15, 1856
Gamaliel Garrison is writing to his nephew, Samuel L. Adair, from Yellow Springs, Ohio, after returning from Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. He writes of the death of his son, David Garrison, and of Frederick Brown, both killed during the Battle of Osawatomie. Garrison indicates that he had expected all his sons to settle in Kansas and that David's wife, Rachel, still speaks well of the country. He hopes that it would be possible to hold on to David's claim for his heirs. The sheet of paper also contains a letter from James Garrison. (See item #90509.)


Grand New Year's Ball

Grand New Year's Ball
Date: December 30, 1859
This invitation was to a ball to be held at the Osage Valley House in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Tickets were $2.50 and a supper was to be served at ten o'clock. The proprietors of the Osage Valley House were Fisher and Crouch. The invitation was issues by several men from Osawatomie and surrounding communities.


H. J. Williams to Florella Brown Adair

H. J. Williams to Florella Brown Adair
Creator: Williams, H. J. (Mrs. John)
Date: January 27, 1857
H. J. (Mrs. John) Williams writes to express her sympathy for the conditions Mrs. Adair has to endure in Kansas Territory and eloquently describes what suffering she felt Mrs. Adair has experienced. Mrs. Williams indicates that boxes of materials have been sent to Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, and expresseds her fears they have not arrived. The letter provides news of the Williams family and others in Lafayette, Ohio.


H. J. Williams to Florella Brown Adair

H. J. Williams to Florella Brown Adair
Creator: Williams, H. J. (Mrs. John)
Date: October 29, 1856
Mrs. Williams had been a member of one of Rev. Samuel L. Adair's churches in Lafayette, Ohio. She writes Mrs. Adair about her concern for the Adair family during all of the troubles in Kansas Territory. She and her husband also sent some cheese and cloth to the Adairs. The letter has references to various family members and demonstrates the support women settlers in Kansas Territory received from friends in the East.


Hiram Jackson Strickler to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Hiram Jackson Strickler to Thomas Nesbit Stinson
Creator: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: September 2, 1856
Hiram Jackson Strickler, adjutant general of Kansas Territory, writing from Lecompton, Kansas Territory, briefly described for Thomas N. Stinson the Battle of Osawatomie that took place on August 30, 1856. In the battle, pro-slavery forces led by John W. Reed defeated free state forces led by John Brown. Brown's son Frederick was killed in the engagement. Strickler's comments indicated that he held a pro-slavery perspective.


Independence Grand Pic Nic Party

Independence Grand Pic Nic Party
Date: July 5, 1858
This invitation is for a party to be held at McAllister's Hall in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory, on July 5, 1858. Music will be provided by Smith's Band. Supper is provided and tickets cost $2.50. The back of the invitation lists 27 dances that will be performed. This party is sponsored by several individuals from Osawatomie, Indianapolis, Paola, Stanton, Lane City, Lawrence, and several other communities.


Jason Brown

Jason Brown
Creator: Leonard & Martin
Jason Brown was one of abolitionist John Brown's sons. He came to Kansas Territory in February, 1855, along with his brothers John Jr, Owen, Salmon, and Frederick and settled near Osawatomie. He was involved in numerous free state activities. This image is from some time later in his life.


Jason Brown to Samuel L. Adair

Jason Brown to Samuel L. Adair
Creator: Brown, Jason
Date: April 4, 1859
Jason Brown writes to Samuel L. Adair from Akron, Ohio, in response, evidently, to an earlier letter Adair had written him concerning placing a claim for property lost while in Kansas Territory. Brown writes that he didn't think any radical anti-slavery supporters would receive any funds from Congress in the near future. He believes that if he had been on the pro-slavery side, his claim would have been paid. He asks Adair to check his young son's (A. Brown) grave in the Lawrence cemetery to ensure that T. L. Whitney had built a picket fence around it, as he'd requested, and to pay Whitney if it had been done (or that Adair would have it done and Brown would reimburse Adair).


Jeremiah R. Brown to Samuel and Florella Adair

Jeremiah R. Brown to Samuel and Florella Adair
Creator: Brown, Jeremiah Root
Date: November 1, 1856
Jeremiah R. Brown writes from Hudson, Ohio, to Samuel and Florella Adair in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. Brown reports he has raised funds to send to Kansas Territory and mentions other efforts to aid people there. He writes about helping various Brown family members and of his concerns about the "aggression of the slave power."


John Brown, Jr.

John Brown, Jr.
John Brown, Jr. was one of abolitionist John Brown's sons. He came to Kansas Territory in February, 1855, along with his brothers Jason, Owen, Salmon, and Frederick, and settled near Osawatomie. He was involved in numerous free state activities and, for a time, was one of the free state prisoners held near Lecompton, Kansas Territory. He also served as the commander of a free state militia company.


Kansas Territory, U.S. District Court versus General John W. Reid

Kansas Territory, U.S. District Court versus General John W. Reid
Date: 1856
Material relating to Kansas Territory, U.S. District Court, versus General John William Reid of Jackson County, Missouri, for the sacking of Osawatomie and kidnapping two boys. The statement was made by Rufus Gilpatrick to the Associate Justice Cato. Reid, along with around 300 Border Ruffians, looted and burned Osawatomie, Kansas on August 30, 1856.


Kansas Territory, U.S. District Court versus John Brown, Jr. for horse stealing

Kansas Territory, U.S. District Court versus John Brown, Jr. for horse stealing
Date: 1856-1857
Materials relating to the case of the Kansas Territory, U.S. District Court versus John Brown, Jr., on the charge of grand larceny for stealing a horse from George R. Hopper on May 23, 1856 in Lykins County, Kansas (now Miami County). Second District Judge Sterling G. Cato issued a subpeona for the testimony of Thomas Kelly, Charles A. Foster, Samuel M. Merrill, Joseph B. Higgins, William Collis, Harvey Jackson, and William Chestnut.


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