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Showing 1 - 23 of 23 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Annie (Le Porte) Diggs
Creator: Snyder
Date: Between 1890 and 1899
A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women's suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer's Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women's voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.


Ephraim Nute

Ephraim Nute
Date: 1860s
Portrait of Rev. Ephraim Nute. He was a Unitarian minister in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Nute served as chaplain for the Territorial Legislature at Lecompton and was a chaplain for the First Regiment of the Kansas Volunteers.


Ephraim Nute to Amos Adams Lawrence

Ephraim Nute to Amos Adams Lawrence
Creator: Nute, Ephraim
Date: January 5, 1857
Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts, regarding the subject of a college. A well-attended town meeting had been held in which the idea had been discussed, though all seemed only "a castle in the air" but for Lawrence's "liberal offer" (presumably of funding) which was the "first step toward the realization of his project." The general opinion of the people was that the college should be constructed outside the town limits "on the high prairie or table land." Nute also mentioned the steps being taken to establish free public schools in the city, of upper and lower grades.


Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale
Creator: Nute, Ephraim
Date: April 6, 1857
Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute included a list of books that he wished to add to his Unitarian church library. Nute commented on the difficulties experienced by those attempting to spread Christianity in Kansas. He also observed that immigration to Kansas was increasing.


Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale
Creator: Nute, Ephraim
Date: May 10, 1858
Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute inquired about the possibility of Hale arranging a loan of $2000 at reasonable interest for the completion of the Unitarian Church in Lawrence. He reported on the high rates of interest being charged for loans in Kansas Territory and on the general effects of the panic of 1857 on the territorial economy. Nute also expressed his dissatisfaction with the Buchanan administration's handling of the Lecompton Constitution and his hope that a change in presidential administration in 1860 would result in Kansas' admission as a free state.


Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale
Creator: Nute, Ephraim
Date: August 3, 1857
Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute described efforts to establish a high school in Lawrence as well as a university in Kansas Territory. He also advised Hale to pay close attention to the activities of Francis Serenbetz, a German Congregational minister who was the leader of a group of German immigrants who settled in Humboldt, Kansas Territory. In Nute's opinion, Serenbetz was an "unmitigated humbug and nuisance" who came to Kansas for self-interested reasons. Nute urged Hale to stop sending settlers to Kansas who lacked financial resources or a willingness to work to support themselves.


Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale
Creator: Nute, Ephraim
Date: April 28, 1857
Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute observed that Francis Serenbetz, a German Congregational minister, and his party of thirty German immigrants were in Lawrence and getting ready to head south to establish a colony on the Neosho River that they planned to name Humboldt. Nute was not optimistic that the Serenbetz party would succeed due to their lack of financial resources. Nute commented that immigration into Kansas continued to increase and estimated that nearly 1,000 people per day entered the territory. He stated that most of the new immigrants were from Western states and "of the right kind to stay." Nute also commented on the lack of saw and grist mills in the territory and blamed the New England Emigrant Aid Company for the deficiency.


Ephriam Nute, Jr. to Reverend Edward Everett Hale

Ephriam Nute, Jr. to Reverend Edward Everett Hale
Creator: Nute, Ephraim
Date: October 3, 1855
Ephraim Nute, a Unitarian minister writing from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Edward Everett Hale, described the natural environment, economic developments, politics, religious affairs, and daily life in the territory. Nute commented on the need for more saw mills, efforts to construct a church, prospects for "free-thinking Christianity," and the possibility of armed conflict in the territory.


J. Heath to John Stillman Brown

J. Heath to John Stillman Brown
Creator: Heath, J.
Date: September 30, 1862
A letter written by J. Heath from Paola, Kansas, addressed to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Brown had apparently asked Heath for assistance in helping him become an Army chaplain, but Heath's letter informed him that the request was made too late. Heath also discusses camp life in Paola.


James H. Buxton to D.L. Chandler

James H. Buxton to D.L. Chandler
Creator: Buxton, James H.
Date: April 27, 1862
A letter written by James H. Buxton from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to Daniel L. Chandler, an army hospital steward who had cared for Buxton. James describes life in Lawrence with members of the John Stillman Brown family. He also mentions the removal of troops from Lawrence to Fort Riley and expresses his wish to live with Chandler after the end of the war.


John S. Brown to Edward Everett Hale

John S. Brown to Edward Everett Hale
Creator: Brown, John S.
Date: May 2, 1858
John S. Brown wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Brown informed Hale that he had substituted for Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, for the previous six months while Nute lectured in the East. Brown stated that he wanted to serve in Kansas as a missionary but lacked financial resources. He asked Hale for funds to support his missionary efforts.


John S. Brown to William Brown

John S. Brown to William Brown
Creator: Brown, John S.
Date: June 13, 1858
This letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by John Stillman Brown, was addressed to his son, William Brown, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. The letter included information about their local church meetings and the talk surrounding the murder of Gaius Jenkins by James Henry Lane over a land dispute. Brown also mentioned a sermon he'd preached, which outlined the beliefs of the Unitarians. He admonished his son to immerse himself in the Scriptures, and to stop drinking tea and other stimulants. The letter concluded with a discussion of politics, particularly the Lecompton and Leavenworth Constitutions.


John Stillman Brown to John L. Rupur

John Stillman Brown to John L. Rupur
Creator: Brown, John Stillman, 1806-1902
Date: September 1, 1863
This letter was written by John Stillman Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to John L. Rupur. Brown gives a detailed and emotional account of William Quantrill's August 21, 1863, raid on Lawrence. Brown lists individual men and groups such as African Americans and Germans who were killed in the attack. He witnessed much of the violence from a hill above the city, and describes the destruction of life and property. Brown mentions that the town had no warning before the attack and that there was a second panic the following evening when townspeople feared another raid. He also describes how the community's churches came together for a memorial service. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


John Stillman Brown to William Brown

John Stillman Brown to William Brown
Creator: Brown, John Stillman, 1806-1902
Date: February 14, 1858
A letter written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by John Stillman Brown, addressed to his son, William Brown, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy. Brown admonished his son for not writing. He discusses the cold weather and the political conditions in territorial Kansas, including his opposition to the Lecompton Constitution. Brown predicted high immigration to Kansas in the coming spring, and also predicted that "Kansas is sure to be Free" and without any slaves within two years.


John Stillman Brown to William Brown

John Stillman Brown to William Brown
Creator: Brown, John S.
Date: June 21, 1857
This letter, written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, is a tender, heartfelt piece of correspondence, speaking of the joys and triumphs of living in a new land. Brown enjoyed his time in Kansas, preaching at a local church and working on his claim. He outlined for his son, who was away at boarding school in New Hampshire, his typical day-to-day activities, which included cooking, gardening, and housekeeping. He also wrote of the currently peaceful state of affairs in Kansas.


Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: November 27, 1862
This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from the "Camp of Grant's Army near Grand Junction Tenn.," was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber described camp life and mentioned the possibility that the troops would return to Kansas. He also discussed the contrast between "the pomp and circumstance of war" and the "blind bull-dog fight" he witnessed at the Battle of Wilson's Creek on August 10, 1861. The last portion of his letter deals with issues such as clothing, Thanksgiving, and other political issues.


Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: October 22, 1859
This letter, written by Leigh R. Webber from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Webber discussed personal issues such as the health of the Brown family, the weather and agricultural issues. He wrote about Kansas and national politics, including Charles Robinson's role as governor under the new Leavenworth Constitution and James H. Lane's political ambitions. The latter part of the letter focused on John Brown. Webber was conflicted about the morality of Brown's violent actions; while he deemed them "reckless and hopeless," he also believed they may have been provoked by Brown's own religious beliefs and the violence of "the slave power".


Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: March 8, 1862
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Fort Scott, Bourbon County, Kansas, to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber describes the march from Kansas City, Missouri, to Fort Scott, Kansas, describing landmarks along the way and discussing the soldiers' state of exhaustion. He continues a discussion from a previous letter regarding his father's death. Webber also describes camp life and future plans to march on to Fort Smith.


Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: August 30, 1862-August 31, 1862
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Gibson County, West Tennessee, addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber begins with the news that the troops may return to Kansas, though he and the other soldiers particularly wished to avoid Lawrence due to previous negative experience there. He describes camp news as well as local individuals and commerce. The second portion of Webber's letter relates news that the troops would be sent back to Missouri and expresses dread at the prospect of guerrilla warfare.


Charles H. Branscomb to Rev. Edward E. Hale

Charles H. Branscomb to Rev. Edward E. Hale
Creator: Branscomb, Charles H.
Date: April 25, 1857
Charles Branscomb wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Branscomb informed Hale that he had advanced money Francis Serenbetz and his party of thirty German emigrants to assist them in their effort to establish a colony on the Neosho River. Branscomb indicated that there had been considerable confusion about whether the New England Emigrant Aid Company had agreed to provide the Serenbetz party with funds, but he felt it best to provide the money.


M.R. Brown to William Brown

M.R. Brown to William Brown
Creator: Brown, Mary Ripley, d. 1878
Date: December 11, 1861
A letter written from Lawrence, Kansas, by M.R. Brown, addressed to her son, William Brown, who was in college in New York. Brown begins by discussing the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. She discusses the 300 African Americans who had fled slavery and were now living in Lawrence, and the efforts of an African-American minister in the community. Brown expresses fear that Lawrence would be attacked by Missourians. She also gives news of Leigh R. Webber, a Kansas soldier who often wrote to members of the Brown family.


Mary Brown  to William Brown

Mary Brown to William Brown
Creator: Brown, Mary Ann Day , 1816-1884
Date: January 30, 1859
This letter, written by Mary Brown from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to her brother, William, who was studying at Phillip Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. Mary and William were the children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. The main focus of the letter is the story of how Dr. John Doy was captured by Missourians while aiding twelve fugitive slaves. Mary was convinced that someone had told the Missourians about the plan of escape. She also mentioned her father's religious work, and "Old" John Brown's work to free Missouri slaves.


Sarah Brown to William Brown

Sarah Brown to William Brown
Creator: Brown, Sarah
Date: February 23, 1862
A letter written by Sarah Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to her brother, William Brown, who was in college in New York. The first part of her letter discusses the presence of the Kansas First in Lawrence. She describes the soldiers as "rough" and notes the proslavery attitude of the regiment, which leads them to abuse African Americans living in Lawrence. Sarah goes on to discuss her views on the need for immediate emancipation. She discusses family issues such as the death of her cousin and a scrapbook she was making with her sister, Mary. The last portion of the letter discusses Sarah's interest in botany and local plants. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


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