Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

Winter 1977, Volume 43, Number 4

-

Random Item

Corn field Corn field

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 733,784
Bookbag items: 38,935
Registered users: 11,905

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 16

Category Filters

People - Notable Kansans - Nichols, Clarina Irene Howard, 1810-1885

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 16 of 16 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


An appeal to the women of the State of New York

An appeal to the women of the State of New York
Creator: Nichols, Clarinda I. Howard
Date: Between 1855 and 1857
This circular is written by Clarina Nichols to the women of New York. In her eloquent letter, she attempts to persuade them to send support to the people of Kansas, appealing to their hearts and their experiences as mothers.


Clarina Irene Howard Nichols

Clarina Irene Howard Nichols
Date: Between 1845 and 1861
This photograph is a studio portrait of Clarina Irene Howard Nichols. In 1854 Nichols joined the New England Emigrant Aid Society and moved her family to a claim in southern Douglas County, near Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Her husband died the next year and in 1856 Nichols moved the family to Wyandotte County where she became associate editor of the Quindaro Chindowan, an abolitionist newspaper. Nichols attended the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention in 1859 where she secured liberal property rights for Kansas women, equal guardianship of their children, and the right to vote on all school questions. Susan B. Anthony paid tribute to Clarina Nichols in her book, "History of Woman Suffrage."


Clarina Irene Howard Nichols

Clarina Irene Howard Nichols
Date: between 1855 and 1861
Portrait of Clarina Irene Howard Nichols, 1810-1885. Nichols and her husband settled in Quindaro, Wyandotte County, Kansas Territory, where she was active in politics and women's rights. Nichols attended the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention in 1859, where she secured for Kansas women liberal property rights, equal guardianship of their children, and the right to vote on all school questions. Susan B. Anthony paid tribute to Clarina Nichols in her book, "History of Woman Suffrage."


Clarina Irene Howard Nichols, receipt

Clarina Irene Howard Nichols, receipt
Creator: Nichols, Clarinda I. Howard
Date: December 6, 1856
This receipt, given to Clarina Nichols by her audience in Naples, New York, declares that the thirty-six dollars she received after her speaking engagement was for Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. Nichols had been giving lectures on the free state cause as an agent of this emigrant aid company.


Clarina Irene Howard Nichols to Thaddeus Hyatt

Clarina Irene Howard Nichols to Thaddeus Hyatt
Creator: Nichols, Clarinda I. Howard
Date: October 4, 1856
This letter, written from Elmira, New York, provides a neat outline of Clarina Nichols' goals and motivations. It deals with her speaking engagements on the situation in Kansas, her goals for the future, her family, and her belief that Susan B. Anthony would be a great help to the free state cause.


Clarina Irene Howard Nichols to Thaddeus Hyatt

Clarina Irene Howard Nichols to Thaddeus Hyatt
Creator: Nichols, Clarinda I. Howard
Date: October 15, 1856
This brief letter, written by Clarina Nichols from Elmira, New York, informed Thaddeus Hyatt of her successful speaking tour in Pennsylvania. She was also eager to hear more details about the National Kansas Committee's work in the territory.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: December 3, 1854
Cyrus K. Holliday, the founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He told her of his planned trip up the Kansas River, his pleasure in the people of Kansas Territory, and a Thanksgiving dinner he attended. Unwilling to return to Pennsylvania, Holliday expressed desire that Mary come to Kansas Territory and described the construction of a friend's sod-covered "mansion," one such as Clarina I. H. Nichols, a lecturer and writer, inhabited.


Harriet S. Crandall to Thaddeus Hyatt

Harriet S. Crandall to Thaddeus Hyatt
Creator: Crandall, Harriet S.
Date: December 17, 1856
This letter, written by Harriet S. Crandall from Alfred Centre, New York, gives an idea of Clarina Nichols' involvement in the free state cause, specifically her lectures to the public. After hearing one of these lectures, six ladies from this town were appointed to oversee the collection of relief funds for free state settlers in Kansas. They had already collected clothing, bedding, and money for the cause.


Legislative assembly petitions for women's suffrage, 1859

Legislative assembly petitions for women's suffrage, 1859
Date: 1859
Petitions from the 1859 Kansas Territory Legislative Assembly focusing on women's suffrage. Signers include Clarina Nichols, Charles and Sara Robinson, Mary E. Lane, and Augustus and Susan Wattles. After more than fifty years, women in Kansas won the right to vote in November 1912, with the approval of the Equal Suffrage Amendment to the state constitution. Funds for digitizing this item were provided by Marilyn S. Blackwell and Kristen T. Oertel, authors of Frontier Feminist: Clarina Howard Nichols and the Politics of Motherhood. The publication was the winner of the Coalition for Western Women's History Armitage Jameson prize. A searchable transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.


Mrs. C. H. Nichols

Mrs. C. H. Nichols
Clarina Nichols; Wyandotte Co.; Women's Suffrage


Nichols Memorial

Nichols Memorial
Creator: St. John, Mrs. John P.
Date: May 10, 1881
This pamphlet is addressed "To the Women of Kansas" with the purpose of raising funds to include a "steel portrait" of Mrs. Clarina I. Howard Nichols in the soon to be published history of woman suffrage The pamphlet lists the rights for women that were included in the Kansas Constitution, as a result of the advocacy efforts of Mrs. Nichols. These included equal educational opportunities in state colleges, equal rights in forming and conducting "common schools," equal right for custody of children, and the right to hold and accumulate property. The authors emphasized that Mrs. Nichols was not an official member of the convention and could not vote on any of these issues. Rather, she had to persuade the male delegates to support them. The pamphlet was written by Mrs. John P. St. John, Mrs. J. K. Hudson, Mrs. John Francis, and Mrs. F. G. Adams. Evidently their fund raising efforts were successful. There is a portrait of Mrs. Nichols between pages 192 and 193 in Volume 1, Chapter VII "Reminisces by Clarina I. Howard Nichols" in History of Woman Suffrage: 1841-1861 edited by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan Brownell Anthony, Matilda Joslyn Gage, and Ida Husted Harper. Funds for digitizing this item were provided by Marilyn S. Blackwell and Kristen T. Oertel, authors of Frontier Feminist: Clarina Howard Nichols and the Politics of Motherhood. The publication was the winner of the Coalition for Western Women's History Armitage Jameson prize.


Reminiscences of Quindaro, Wyandotte County

Reminiscences of Quindaro, Wyandotte County
Creator: Nichols, Clarina I. Howard
Date: June 16, 1882-December 29, 1882
These items are contained in Volume 3 of the Wyandotte County newspaper clippings. Clarina Nichols wrote letters to the Wyandotte Gazette in which she reminiscensed about Quindaro, an early Wyandotte County town. There are three different publication dates. The first letter, published on June 16, 1882, is dated June 6, 1882, but the newspaper indicates this is the second letter. The other two selections are not dated though the newspaper publication date is. The letters are written in a highly literary style. The one published June 16 describes parts of the town of Quindaro. The next clipping describes some prohibition efforts. The last one identifies a cabin as part of the underground railroad and Nichols also describes her personal assistance to a fleeing slave named Caroline. Mrs. Nichols was living in Pomo, California in 1882. Funds for digitizing this item were provided by Marilyn S. Blackwell and Kristen T. Oertel, authors of Frontier Feminist: Clarina Howard Nichols and the Politics of Motherhood. The publication was the winner of the Coalition for Western Women's History Armitage Jameson prize.


Secretary's book for Moneka Woman's Rights Association

Secretary's book for Moneka Woman's Rights Association
Creator: Moneka Woman's Rights Association
Date: Between 1858 and 1860
This volume contains the minutes of meetings for the Moneka Woman's Rights Association. It also includes the organization's preamble, constitution, and list of members. Members were both male and female. Officers were elected quarterly. Most meetings consisted of an address and discussion of a particular question related to women's rights issues. They addressed letters to territorial constitutional conventions and to the Kansas Legislature and supported the work of Clarina (Mrs. C. I. H.) Nichols.


Statement related to the Quindaro Town Company

Statement related to the Quindaro Town Company
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: November 22, 1858
Charles Robinson gave his consent as an individual member of the Quindaro Town Company that the Board of Trade could use the town company's printing press and type free of charge if they agreed to publish the Quindaro Chindowan on a weekly basis for three months beginning in December, 1858. The document also included Robinson's consent to pay Mrs. Clarina Nichols the $125 due her.


Thaddeus Hyatt to Horace White

Thaddeus Hyatt to Horace White
Creator: Hyatt, Thaddeus
Date: Between August 19, 1856 and November 24, 1856
This copy of a letter, which is added onto the end of another copied letter, is addressed to Horace White from Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The letter begins with a description of Hyatt's sleeping arrangements the past two nights and then moves on to other personal matters. He concludes the letter with committee business, mentioning his fear that funds and provisions were not truly being handed out to the neediest settlers. He also details an encounter with Mr. Carpenter, whose mother was Clarina Nichols. At the end of the letter are copies of two telegraphic dispatches sent by Thaddeus Hyatt to William F. M. Arny, general agent for the committee, on November 22th and 24th, 1856. Both dispatches concern Dr. Root, who was involved in Kansas relief.


The Responsibilities of Woman

The Responsibilities of Woman
Creator: Nichols, C. I. H., Mrs
Date: October 15, 1851
Clarina Nichols gave this speech at the Woman's Rights Convention held in Worcester, Massachusetts, on October 15, 1851. Nichols states that the woman's sphere was all of humanity rather than the narrow interpretation of her time. She believed this because the necessities of living often forced women outside of the protection of the "woman's sphere." She believed that education was the most important thing parents could give their daughters; because if they were educated, they could deal with anything. Mrs. Nichols later came to Kansas Territory and was an advocate for women's rights at the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention.


Showing 1 - 16

Copyright © 2007-2021 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.