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Showing 1 - 13 of 13 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Augustus Wattles

Augustus Wattles
Augustus Wattles was an abolitionist who came to Kansas Territory from Ohio in 1855. For a time, he helped George Washington Brown publish the "Herald of Freedom" in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. In 1857, he was one of the founders of Moneka in Linn County, Kansas Territory. He was a supporter of abolitionist John Brown, and Brown stayed at his home several times after the Marais des Cygnes massacre. Wattles served in the Kansas Territory legislature in 1855.


Augustus Wattles to William Hutchinson

Augustus Wattles to William Hutchinson
Creator: Wattles, Augustus, 1807-1876
Date: April 28, 1858
Wattles, writing from Fort Scott, Kansas Territory, describes the violence in the southern portion of Kansas Territory shortly before the Marais des Cygnes massacre.


Henry A. Strong correspondence

Henry A. Strong correspondence
Creator: Strong, Henry A.
Date: December 24, 1860-August 10, 1865
Henry Strong wrote these letters to Otis B. Strong of Huntsburg, Ohio. Strong was in Company K, 12th Regiment, Kansas Volunteers from Paola, Kansas, during the Civil War. The letters were written from various places: Moneka, Kansas; Little Rock, Arkansas; Camp Blunt, Paola, Kansas; Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, Kansas City, Missouri; Osawatomie, Kansas; Fort Smith, Arkansas; Chattanooga, Tennessee; Mansfield, Kansas; Fort Gibson, Cherokee Nation. The letters address Strong's activities as a Kansas volunteer during the Civil War.


J. H. Kagi to his sister and father

J. H. Kagi to his sister and father
Creator: Kagi, John Henry
Date: September 23, 1858
From Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Kagi write that he had spent several weeks at Osawatomie caring for "Old B." [John Brown], who had "now quite recovered." Things were hard right then, but Kagi is confident that "better times [were] dawning" and that his reward would certainly come "in the end," since "the success of [their] great cause" was "drawing very near." "Few of my age have toiled harder or suffered more in this cause than I, and yet I regret nothing that I have done; nor am I in any discouraged at the future."


John Brown "Parallels" desk

John Brown "Parallels" desk
Date: 1859
This secretary was used in the home of Augustus Wattles at Moneka, Linn County, Kansas Territory. Family tradition holds that abolitionist John Brown wrote his "Parallels" defense at this secretary while visiting Wattles in January, 1859. The tradition further relates that the Wattles children watched Brown as he wrote, peering through cracks in the floor above. To hide his own location and to protect Wattles from retaliation, Brown indicated the "Parallels" were written at Trading Post instead of at Moneka. In this document Brown compares the authorities' hunt for him (for liberating Missouri slaves) to the lack of a search for the perpetrators of the Marais des Cygnes Massacre.


John Brown to William Hutchinson

John Brown to William Hutchinson
Creator: Brown, John, 1800-1859
Date: August 3, 1858
From Moneka, Kansas, John wrote to William Hutchinson regarding his (Brown's) "Revolvers," which had been distributed on loan to others in Kansas. Brown had been spending some weeks near the Kansas-Missouri border, "on the claim upon which the whole sale murders [Marias des Cygnes Massacre, May 19, 1858] were committed," as a show of force to more would-be invaders.


John Otis Wattles

John Otis Wattles
John Otis Wattles was one of the founders of Moneka in Linn County, Kansas Territory, in 1857. He was a promoter of the town and was a member of the Moneka Woman's Rights Association. Wattles was also an abolitionist. He was involved in promoting a railroad that would run from Jefferson City, Missouri, to Emporia, Kansas Territory.


Kagi to his sister, father and others

Kagi to his sister, father and others
Creator: Kagi, John Henry, 1835-1859
Date: August 13, 1858
By June 28, 1858, J. H. Kagi was back in Kansas Territory at Lawrence, and on August 13 he was writing the family from Moneka, Linn County, where he had "been very busily engaged in fortifying along the State line to prevent further inroads from Missouri." [See J.B. letter of August 3 to Wm. Hutchinson in which he speaks of building the fort on the site of the Marie des Cygnes Massacre.] In an unusually open and frank few lines, Kagi wrote: "C. W. Moffet and two of the other boys (whom you have not seen) are in Ashtabula Co., Ohio. Some have gone to Harpers Ferry. We are all ready and in good spirits. Things are working rightly, here, and brightening elsewhere for our final work. Those who once thought us the most foolish, now think most cheerfully of the whole plan." He closed by asking that they write him at the "Whitney House" in Lawrence.


Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: March 8, 1862
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Fort Scott, Bourbon County, Kansas, to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber describes the march from Kansas City, Missouri, to Fort Scott, Kansas, describing landmarks along the way and discussing the soldiers' state of exhaustion. He continues a discussion from a previous letter regarding his father's death. Webber also describes camp life and future plans to march on to Fort Smith.


Samuel Ayers to Lyman Langdon

Samuel Ayers to Lyman Langdon
Date: January 7, 1859-July 6, 1864
Samuel Ayers was born in Massachusetts and lived in Defiance, Ohio, before coming to Kansas Territory, probably in 1859. These letters are written to Lyman Langdon, a friend from Defiance. Unless the letters were written while Ayers was with Civil War troops, the location in the letter heading is either Centreville or Moneka, Linn County. Ayers served as a chaplain for the Seventh Kansas Cavalry, which was led by Colonel Charles R. Jennison and later D. R. Anthony. He was mustered in October 14, 1861. The letters are very descriptive of both events and the areas through which Ayers traveled. A letter written January 7, 1859 contains a copy of a item published in the Lawrence Republican that is titled "Who is Responsible?" concerning hostile events in Linn and Bourbon counties. Mr. Ayers indicates to Langdon that he agrees with most of the content. The letter for April 8, 1861, expresses gratitude for the relief assistance the settlers have received from Ohio and that it had been critical to their survival. Ayers, writing Nov. 15, 1861, describes some troop movements and indicates that he is convinced that the "secessionists" must be treated harshly if they are to be defeated. The letter dated December 29, 1861, describes the capture and killing of a Confederate officer home on leave; the destruction caused by the 7th Kansas Cavalry near West Point, MO; various other activities; and his thoughts about the war. A letter written from Lawrence on April 5, 1862, tells of the various units stationed in the area. His letter for May 6, 1862 was written from Fort Riley, where the unit was ordered to provide escort along the route to New Mexico. However, the order was countermanded and the unit was sent east, eventually spending time in Corinth, Tennessee. Ayers provides descriptions of all of the communities from Lawrence to Fort Riley. Three letters written during June, 1862, provide details about the fortifications around Corinth, an important railroad junction and about how the secessionist supporters interacted with the Union troops and the activities of units in that region. Ayers' letter dated January 1, 1863, references the Emancipation Proclamation. Other letters from 1863 describe activities of bushwhackers and Quantrill's raid on Lawrence in the August 24, 1863 epistle. The last letter is dated July 6, 1864, from "camp near Lawrence." Samuel Ayers wrote that he was serving under a contract as a surgeon. Mr. Ayers had two sons, Samuel N. and John, who served in Company H of the Seventh Kansas Cavalry.


Samuel Ayres [Ayers?] to Lyman Langdon

Samuel Ayres [Ayers?] to Lyman Langdon
Creator: Ayres, Samuel
Date: January 7, 1859-July 6, 1864
Samuel Ayres [Ayers?] served as a chaplain for the Seventh Kansas Cavalry, which was led by Colonel Charles R. Jennison. He was mustered in October 14, 1861. Several of the Civil War letters in this collection have been digitized. They are written to Lyman Langdon of Defiance, Ohio, where Ayres lived before settling in Moneka, Linn County, Kansas. The letter dated December 29, 1861, describes the capture and killing of a Confederate officer home on leave; the destruction caused by the 7th Kansas Cavalry near West Point, MO; various other activities; and his thoughts about the war. A letter written from Lawrence on April 5, 1962, tells of the various units stationed in the area. The regiment eventually spent some time in Tennessee and, in a letter "in camp near Union City, Ten" dated June 12, 1862, Ayres describes how the secessionist supporters interacted with the Union troops and the activities of units in that region. Writing from his home in Moneka on June 1, 1863, he describes visits by bushwhackers and guerrillas. He also shares news about various areas of Union activity, including Vicksburg, MS.


Secretary's book for Moneka Woman's Rights Association

Secretary's book for Moneka Woman's Rights Association
Creator: Moneka Woman's Rights Association
Date: Between 1858 and 1860
This volume contains the minutes of meetings for the Moneka Woman's Rights Association. It also includes the organization's preamble, constitution, and list of members. Members were both male and female. Officers were elected quarterly. Most meetings consisted of an address and discussion of a particular question related to women's rights issues. They addressed letters to territorial constitutional conventions and to the Kansas Legislature and supported the work of Clarina (Mrs. C. I. H.) Nichols.


William Hutchinson to Helen Hutchinson

William Hutchinson to Helen Hutchinson
Creator: Hutchinson, William , 1823-1904
Date: January 3, 1859
A resident of Lawrence, Kansas Territory, and correspondent from the New York Tribune, William Hutchinson writes his wife Helen from Mapleton, northern Bourbon County, right after the first of the year, 1859, to tell her about "the wars" in the southern part of the territory and about the activities of "Old" John Brown and his followers. Hutchinson met with the "war council," as well as with James Montgomery, advised against "rash measures," and, with Montgomery, participated in a large meeting of the citizens "to devise a plan for peace." (A note on the back of page 4, by R.J. Hinton, reads, "Copied by my wife from original. Interesting." A good number of the documents in this folder are copies--mostly handwritten.)


Showing 1 - 13

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