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Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company dwelling, Williams, Arizona Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company dwelling, Williams, Arizona

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1880 census of Farmer Township, Wabaunsee County, Kansas

1880 census of Farmer Township, Wabaunsee County, Kansas
Creator: United States. Census Office. 10th census, 1880
Date: June 1, 1880 through June 2, 1880
This excerpt of a census schedule provides details--including the name, age, race, and occupation--of settlers in Farmer Township in Wabaunsee County, Kansas. The county included a black population (B=Black) who had settled there in 1879 with the help of the Freedmen's Relief Association.


1880 census of Nicodemus Township, Graham County, Kansas

1880 census of Nicodemus Township, Graham County, Kansas
Creator: United States. Census Office. 10th census, 1880
Date: June 8, 1880 through June 23, 1880
This census schedule provides details--including the name, age, race, and occupation--of both white and black settlers in Nicodemus Township in Graham County, Kansas. This township had been settled by African Americans in 1877 along the south fork of the Solomon River.


1880 census of Rock Creek Township, Wabaunsee County, Kansas

1880 census of Rock Creek Township, Wabaunsee County, Kansas
Creator: United States. Census Office. 10th census, 1880
Date: June 11, 1880
This excerpt of a census schedule provides details--including the name, age, race, and occupation--of settlers in Rock Creek Township in Wabaunsee County, Kansas. The county included a black population (B=Black) who had settled there in 1879 with the help of the Freedmen's Relief Association.


About Nicodemus, The Daily Journal

About Nicodemus, The Daily Journal
Creator: Lawrence Daily Journal
Date: April 30, 1879
This article from the Lawrence Daily Journal discusses a newspaper article from the Chicago Tribune written during the Exoduster Movement in 1879 providing a brief history of the black community of freed people at Nicodemus, Kansas settled in 1877. Nicodemus is now a historic site administered by the National Parks Service.


All colored people that want to go to Kansas

All colored people that want to go to Kansas
Creator: Nicodemus Town Company
Date: 1877
This broadside advertises the availability of land in Nicodemus, Graham County, Kansas encouraging African-American immigration to Kansas. As noted on the poster, some African-American residents of Lexington, Kentucky, were moving to Nicodemus and consolidating themselves with the Nicodemus Town Company. Nicodemus was settled in 1877, and is the only surviving all-black settlement west of the Mississippi that was settled by former slaves during the post-Civil War Reconstruction period. It is now a historic site administered by the National Parks Service.


Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's famous passengers

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's famous passengers
Date: 1938
These two black and white photographs show the thoroughbred racehorse Stagehand with trainer Earl Sande. The first photograph shows Stagehand being loaded into a special Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company railcar bound for Louisville, Kentucky. The second image shows Stagehand and Sande at the Santa Anita track.


Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's famous passengers

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's famous passengers
Creator: Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company
Date: 1938
These two black and white photographs show thoroughbred and racehorse Stagehand with trainer Earl Sande aboard an Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company special railcar. The two were departing from southern California to Louisville, Kentucky, the home of the Kentucky Derby.


Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's famous passengers

Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company's famous passengers
Creator: Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company
Date: 1938
These two black and white photographs show thoroughbred racehorse Stagehand and trainer Earl Sand at the Santa Anita track in California. The two later departed in a special Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway Company railcar bound for Louisville, Kentucky.


Buffalo Bill bottle

Buffalo Bill bottle
Creator: Regal China Company
Date: 1971
Regal China produced this "Trophy Bottle" in 1971 for the James B. Beam Distilling Company. Designed for the 125th anniversary of William Frederick "Buffalo Bill" Cody's birth, it was filled with a fifth of 100-month old Beam bourbon whiskey. Some commemorative bottles were personalized and given to Cody descendents present at the August 11-14, 1971 celebration at Cody's boyhood in Leavenworth, Kansas.


Charles M. F. Striger to Governor John P. St. John

Charles M. F. Striger to Governor John P. St. John
Creator: Striger, Charles M. F.
Date: May 18, 1879
In this letter Charles Striger, a radical Republican from Kentucky, expresses his concern for free blacks in the South. With rather forceful language he berates Southern Democrats for their harassment of blacks. He also asks Gov. St. John to convince the North that it is their duty to aid any refugees seeking solace from Southern white oppression.


D.D. Fishbank to Mrs. Francis Simmerwell

D.D. Fishbank to Mrs. Francis Simmerwell
Creator: Fishback, D. D.
Date: May 23, 1827
This letter, from D.D. Fishback to Mrs. Francis Simmerwell, addresses some of the problems faced by the missionaries at the Carney Mission, and indicates that the Baptist Female Charitable Society had raised $20 to help the missionaries "to Christianize, and civilize, the Heathen around you." The Carey Mission, which was located in present-day Michigan, was established along the St. Joseph river by Baptist missionary Isaac Mccoy and named for English Baptist missionary William Carey. The mission's primary task was educating the local Native Americans but it also served as a stopping point for American settlers as they headed west.


Disposition of baseball contract for Ed Wilson of Topeka

Disposition of baseball contract for Ed Wilson of Topeka
Date: August 01, 1951
This contract disposition form dated August 1, 1951, was used in a minor league baseball player transaction involving Topekan Ed Wilson. Under its terms, the contract rights to Wilson's services were assigned mid-season by the Paris (IL) Lakers of the Mississippi-Ohio Valley League to the Fulton (KY) Railroaders of the Kentucky-Illinois-Tennessee League. Wilson's minor league career spanned the period 1948-1953. Besides the Paris and Fulton clubs, he played for minor league teams in Miami (OK), Topeka, Iola, and Hannibal (MO). In the 150 minor league games for which his pitching statistics are available, he compiled a 56-32 record, with a 3.62 ERA. Digital reproduction of the form was accomplished through a joint project sponsored by the Kansas Historical Society and the Shawnee County Baseball Hall of Fame.


Ed Wilson of the Fulton, Kentucky, baseball team

Ed Wilson of the Fulton, Kentucky, baseball team
Date: 1952
This photograph from 1952 shows Topekan Ed Wilson when he was a pitcher for the Fulton Lookouts, a minor league team in Fulton, Kentucky, which competed in the Class D Kentucky-Illinois-Tennessee League. Wilson played in Fulton for parts of the 1951 and 1952 seasons. His minor league career spanned the period 1948-1953 and, besides the Lookouts, included teams in Miami (OK), Topeka, Paris (IL), Iola, and Hannibal (MO). In the 150 minor league games for which his pitching statistics are available, Wilson compiled a 56-32 record, with a 3.62 ERA. In 1954, Wilson joined the staff of the Kansas Department of Revenue in Topeka and remained with the department for a 33-year career. Ed Wilson died in 2002 at the age of 73. Digital reproduction of the photograph was accomplished through a joint project sponsored by the Kansas Historical Society and the Shawnee County Baseball Hall of Fame.


George W. Bain to Governor John St. John

George W. Bain to Governor John St. John
Creator: Bain, George W.
Date: August 09, 1880
In this letter, George Bain of Kentucky describes for Kansas Governor St. John the events of a recent temperance meeting in Clear Lake, Iowa. Bain mentions the the morning and afternoon sessions were free but the evening meeting cost 10 cents and "brought them out ahead financially."


Godman Field photograph

Godman Field photograph
Date: May 15, 1919
This panoramic photograph is showing equipment and personnel at Godman Field, Camp Knox, Kentucky. Merle Allen Benson, who was born in Greeley, Kansas, served in the 29th Aero Service Squardon and was discharged on June 3, 1919 at Godman Field, Camp Knox Kentucky. He enlisted at Greeley, Kansas on March 21, 1918.


James Butler (Wild Bill) Hickok family collection

James Butler (Wild Bill) Hickok family collection
Creator: Hickok family
Date: 1851-1904
A collection of fifty-six letters from the family of James Butler ("Wild Bill") Hickok. The letters describe the adventures of the Hickok children (including Wild Bill) in California, Kansas, Missouri and elsewhere, and their parents and family in Troy Grove, Illinois. After Wild Bill's death in Deadwood, Dakota Territory, in 1876, the letters mostly concern his burial, the maintenance of his grave, and his reputation. Correspondents also include Agnes Hickok (Wild Bill's wife), William "Buffalo Bill" Cody, and Charlie H. Utter ("Colorado Charlie"). Ethel Ann Hickok, the last surviving niece of Wild Bill, donated fifty-four letters to the Kansas Historical Society and two letters to historian Joseph G. Rosa in the 1980s. The two Rosa letters (June 6, 1861; March 23, 1880) are included here by permission. The William F. Cody letter to Horace Hickok dated March 23, 1880 originally owned by Joe Rosa was donated to the Kansas State Historical Society on January 9, 2017. Ethel Hickok passed away in 1985 eight months before her 100th birthday. Ethel's niece Edith Harmon and historian Joseph G. Rosa assisted with the donations.


James W. Baird  and Colonel Henry Inman correspondence

James W. Baird and Colonel Henry Inman correspondence
Creator: Baird, James W.
Date: January 10, 1898
In this letter to Colonel Henry Inman, James W. Baird writes in regard to Inman's recent book "The Old Santa Fe Trail: The Story of a Great Highway." Baird informs Inman that his grandfather, also named James Baird, organized the first trading expedition to Mexico using the Santa Fe Trail along the way. Included are dates and details of Baird's grandfather's travels. Also included is Inman's response to Baird in which Inman states that he will put Baird in touch with William E. Connelley, Secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society.


James W. Baird and Marjory Dawson correspondence

James W. Baird and Marjory Dawson correspondence
Creator: Baird, James W.
Date: February 1903-February 21, 1903
This correspondence between James W. Baird and Marjory Dawson of the Missouri Historical Society, concerns the activities of Baird's grandfather James Baird. The letter from J.W. Baird to Dawson, dated February 1903, provides details of his grandfather's life, including his birth in 1767, his early training, his friendship with explorer Zebulon Pike, and his travels along the Santa Fe Trail which included encounters with Indians.


Jayhawk bourbon decanter

Jayhawk bourbon decanter
Creator: Genuine Heritage China
Date: 1969
The Ezra Brooks Distilling Company of Frankfort, Kentucky created this University of Kansas Jayhawk decanter in 1969. It originally contained bourbon. Erza Brooks had a full line of University mascot decanters.


John A. Halderman

John A. Halderman
John Halderman grew up in Kentucky and was trained as a lawyer. He came to Kansas Territory in 1854 and served as the personal secretary to the first territorial governor Andrew Reeder. In 1855, he served as secretary to the first territorial council. He ultimately separated himself from the pro-slavery Lecompton movement. He was the first probate judge of Leavenworth County. He served as a major of the First Kansas volunteers during the Civil War and lived most of the rest of his life in Leavenworth.


John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls
Creator: Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900
Date: June 10, 1859
From Sumner on June 10, 1859, just days after the election for delegates to the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, Ingalls wrote his father about the "well fought" contest in a county (Atchison) that was "an old stronghold of pro-slavery democracy." Ingalls won, of course, even though he at first "regarded the contest as a hopeless one," but still feared that the Democrats could control the convention; if so, "Kansas may be a Slave State after all. . . . It is Estimated that there are five hundred slaves in the territory today by virtue of the Dred Scott decision. A family recently came to this place from Kentucky with five."


John Jordan Crittenden, speech on the Admission of the State of Kansas

John Jordan Crittenden, speech on the Admission of the State of Kansas
Creator: Crittenden, John J. (John Jordan), 1787-1863
Date: March 17, 1858
John J. Crittenden, a Senator of Kentucky, delivered this speech, which addressed the debate over Kansas Territory's admission to the Union under the Lecompton Constitution, on the floor of the Senate. Crittenden, himself a Southerner, contended that there was enough evidence to indicate that the Constitution that had been submitted was not well supported by the citizens of Kansas Territory, and proposed an idea which would become known as the "Crittenden Amendment" which called for the ratification of the whole Lecompton Constitution by a popular vote in the Territory before Kansas could be admitted as a state under it.


Leigh R. Webber to Charles Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Charles Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: March 23, 1862
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Fort Scott, Kansas, addressed to Charles Brown. Webber expresses frustration at his bad health, the poor weather, and fort life. He wished for the troops to move to territory where they could engage in battle and gain "military glory." Webber describes the unruly behavior of the troops, including violence and drunkenness.


Louisville Colonels baseball team, Louisville, Kentucky

Louisville Colonels baseball team, Louisville, Kentucky
Creator: Royal Photo Company
Date: 1915
This is a panoramic photograph showing members of the 1915 Louisville (KY) Colonels baseball team of the American Association. Among those pictured is Wiley Taylor (third from the right), a right-handed pitcher from Louisville, Kansas. Taylor compiled a 6-7 record in 28 games for the Colonels in 1915, and an ERA of 3.51. He started his professional baseball career in 1910 with the Ellsworth minor league team in the Central Kansas League. He pitched in 27 major league games between 1911 and 1914, including three games each with the Detroit Tigers and Chicago White Sox, and the remainder with the St. Louis Browns. His major league record was 2-10, with an ERA of 4.10. In the minor leagues, Wiley Taylor played not only for Louisville and Ellsworth, but also for teams in Austin, Lincoln (NE), Jersey City, Nashville, Salina, and Topeka. After his baseball career, Taylor remained in Pottawatomie County, where he farmed and served four terms as the county sheriff (1925-28 and 1945-48). Late in life, he also ran a service station and recreation parlor in Westmoreland. Wiley Taylor died at the age of 65 in 1954.


Map of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway showing land grants and connections

Map of the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway showing land grants and connections
Creator: Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company
Date: 1871
This map indicates land grant lands available from the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway, in an area from Junction City, Kansas, to Preston, Texas. It is also a map of all connecting railroads from the states of Nebraska, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Tennessee, Missouri, Kentucky, Illinois, Iowa and Indiana. Major rivers, cities, and military installations are shown.


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