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A. Venard to Thaddeus Hyatt

A. Venard to Thaddeus Hyatt
Creator: Venard, A.
Date: October 3, 1860
This letter is from A. Venard, a medical doctor from Pleasant Grove, Kansas Territory, who wrote to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The letter described the sickness and disease that plagued the settlers along the Verdigris River in southeast Kansas. Dr. Venard had worked diligently to aid the settlers, even using funds from his own pocket to purchase medicine, but he requested that the committee give him 100 dollars worth of drugs. Attached to this letter is an itemized list of the drugs he wished purchased with the requested funds.


Absalom White territorial loss claim

Absalom White territorial loss claim
Creator: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
Report of H.L. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas, contained in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set of congressional and executive documents. Absalom White filed claim #246 for the loss of an arm as a result of being struck by a bullet at a battle with southerners near the H. T. Titus [probably Henry C.] home in Douglas County. The arm was subsequently amputated. The claim was not allowed on the grounds that White was "engaged in rebellion and making unwarranted attack on the person and property of a private citizen." Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.


Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill

Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill
Creator: Morton, Albert C.
Date: September 21, 1857
Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, apologizing for his prolonged silence due to a lengthy illness. Morton referred to the upcoming October election, which would select the members of the Territorial Legislature. He also spoke of Governor Walker's attempts to regulate the election process by requiring that all voters be residents of the Territory for at least six months prior to casting a vote. Morton added that Samuel Simpson was in town again, but that nothing had been settled regarding his questionable business practices.


Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill

Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill
Creator: Guthrie, Abelard
Date: January 8, 1859
Albert Morton wrote from Leavenworth City, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Morton reported that there was "a good deal of excitement out for Pikes Peak" and many Leavenworth citizens spoke of traveling there to dig for gold the following spring. His investments were not earning him much money, and he expressed his desire to sell land in order to pay what he owed to Hill and Abelard Guthrie.


An appeal for help in behalf of the colored refugees in Kansas

An appeal for help in behalf of the colored refugees in Kansas
Creator: Rust, Horatio Nelson, 1828-1906
Date: January 22, 1881
This flyer, distributed by the Southern Refugee Relief Association of Chicago, Illinois, describes the dire situation of the African-American refugees relocated in Kansas. The secretary of this association, Horatio N. Rust, had taken this opportunity to pass along information relayed to him by Elizabeth Comstock, an aid worker in Topeka. Comstock was thankful for the donations of food and other goods, but asked for more assistance in feeding, clothing, and sheltering these refugees. The flyer also includes short excerpts of letters by agents of the refugee association who had direct knowledge of the emigrants' situation.


Arthur Capper delivering an address on tuberculosis

Arthur Capper delivering an address on tuberculosis
Creator: Underwood & Underwood
Date: June 24, 1930
View of Kansas Senator Arthur Capper at a WMAL Radio microphone delivering an opening address in the world-wide campaign to stamp out tuberculosis. Doris Mead Gasque is standing behind him dressed in a white robe with red cross. Capper, 1865-1951, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor, 1915-1919, and U. S. Senator, 1919-1949.


A study course on public health

A study course on public health
Creator: Crumbine, Samuel J. (Samuel Jay), 1862-1954
Date: Between 1916 and 1917
This nineteen lesson study course was written by Dr. S. J. Crumbine and others and published by the American Medical Association. It was prepared for the use of women's clubs.


A study made of 719 rural rehabilitation families relative to their standard of living

A study made of 719 rural rehabilitation families relative to their standard of living
Creator: Kansas Emergency Relief Committee
Date: 1935
This study was compiled by Conie Foote, supervisor of home economics, and her county home advisers. The report includes an introductory note from Foote, who states that the goal of this study is to provide the rural rehabilitation program with essential information about the needs of relief clients during the Dust Bowl years. The study addresses several questions, including: "What is the present standard of living of the families making application for rural rehabilitation loans? Is there a standard below which a family cannot live and maintain health and efficiency?" To answer these questions, the report includes statistics, such as charts documenting housing conditions, the number of applicants in each household, the items of household equipment required by relief families, and the number of persons needing medical care.


Bathing the baby

Bathing the baby
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Health
Date: Between 1900 and 1920
This poster, issued by the Kansas State Board of Health, illustrates how to bathe a baby.


Bedpan from Fool Chief's Village Cache, 14SH305

Bedpan from Fool Chief's Village Cache, 14SH305
Date: 1830-1844 CE
This nearly complete bedpan was recovered from a cache pit at the Fool's Chief village excavations. Fool's Chief village was a Kansa village in Shawnee County occupied from 1830 to 1844. The cache pit was located inside a bark house. The cache pit contained this ceramic bedpan, in addition to a covered dish, knives, hoes, an ax, barrel bands, vermillion, mussel shell and a chain and hook that had been carefully stored for future use.


Bottle from the Kaw Mission, 14MO368

Bottle from the Kaw Mission, 14MO368
Date: 1915-1930
This bottle was recovered during excavations at the 2018 Kansas Archeology Training Program Field School at the Kaw Mission in Council Grove. The two clear glass fragments were refit in the Archeology Lab at the Kansas Historical Society. The bottle has an English finish and on the bottom a "N" within a square. This is the bottle maker's mark for the O'bear-Nestor Glass Company of East St. Louis, Illinois. The bottle would have been closed with a cork. The Mission was built over the winter of 1850 - 1851 by the Methodist Episcopal Church South as a school for boys in the Kaw (or Kansa) tribe. The site was acquired by the state of Kansas in 1951 and was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


Bottle from the Last Chance Store, 14MO367

Bottle from the Last Chance Store, 14MO367
Date: Unknown
This complete aqua bottle may have once held medicine, either prescribed or patented. It was recovered during the 2016 Kansas Archeology Training Program at the Last Chance Store in Council Grove. Time and oxidation have created an interesting white swirling pattern on the surface of the bottle. There was no bottle maker's mark on the bottom to aid in dating the bottle. The Last Chance Store was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


Bottles from the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission, 14DP384

Bottles from the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission, 14DP384
Date: 1845-1905
Shown are two small bottles that were recovered from the excavations at the Iowa and Sac and Fox Mission in Doniphan County by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and Kansas Anthropological Association volunteers. The Presbyterian Mission was built in 1845 and closed in 1863. After that part of the building was razed, the rest was used as a residence until 1905. The State of Kansas acquired to property in 1941. Both bottles likely once held medicine or pharmaceuticals.


C. E. Booz to Governor Ben Paulen

C. E. Booz to Governor Ben Paulen
Creator: Booz, C.E.
Date: January 22, 1927
In this letter, C. E. Booz, of the McPherson Hail Insurance Company, writes Kansas Governor Ben Paulen opposing legislation to repeal the Kansas Anti Cigarette law.


Chamberlain's Patent Medicine Bottles from Fort Hays, 14EL301

Chamberlain's Patent Medicine Bottles from Fort Hays, 14EL301
Date: 1892-1915
These two patent medicine bottles were recovered from excavations at historic Fort Hays by Kansas Historical Society archeologists. They date to later than the fort's occupation and may be the result of a dumping episode. Both bottles advertise that they are a "CHAMBERLAIN'S COLIC, CHOLERA AND DIARRHOEA REMEDY" made by the "CHAMBERLAIN MED CO" of "DES MOINES, IOWA." Fort Hays was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1971.


Charles A. Wright to Hiram Hill

Charles A. Wright to Hiram Hill
Creator: Wright, Charles A.
Date: February 1, 1857
Charles Wright wrote from Bald Mountain, New York, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, describing his travel route from Kansas Territory to the East. Wright reported that Samuel Simpson was still in Quindaro and was doing well, but mentioned that another new town in Wyandotte was being developed; Wright believed that this new one was in a better location. He also discussed buying, selling, and the prices of town lots in Lawrence and West Lawrence, and said that construction had begun on the Free State Hotel. Wright added that a "Miss Hall" in Lawrence had begun writing a history of Kansas.


Charles A. Wright to Hiram Hill

Charles A. Wright to Hiram Hill
Creator: Wright, Charles A.
Date: January 4, 1857
Charles Wright wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill, having recently recovered from an extended illness. Wright told him that "peace and quietness seam [sic] to reign throughout the Territory" and anticipated that Kansas would become a free state without too much more trouble from the border ruffians. He added that two new hotels were being built in town, one by Thaddeus Whitney, in order to accommodate the spring emigration rush. Wright directed Hill to write him in New York, as he would be traveling East for the next two months.


Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson

Charles Robinson to Sara Robinson
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: December 15, 1858
In this mostly personal note to his wife, Sara, from Washington, D.C., Charles Robinson briefly mentions the business ("Lawrence case") he had before "the Land Commission," and then complains about the infrequency of his correspondence from home.


Chesebrough Manufacturing Company Vaseline Jar from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327

Chesebrough Manufacturing Company Vaseline Jar from the Adair Cabin Site, 14MM327
Date: 1918-1929
This complete glass jar was recovered during excavations in 2014 of the Adair cabin site, home of Reverend Samuel and Florella Brown Adair and their family, in Osawatomie, Kansas. Osawatomie and the Adairs were much involved with the abolitionist movement during the "Bleeding Kansas" years. While the jar has several cracks, the advertising is still readable: TRADE MARK VASELINE CHESEBROUGH NEW YORK. The machine made jar has a continuous thread closure with a sealing ring.


Chronology of the Iowa and Sac and Fox Indians in Doniphan County, Kansas

Chronology of the Iowa and Sac and Fox Indians in Doniphan County, Kansas
Date: 1882
This chronology details major events occurring between 1837-1855 among the Iowa and Sac and Fox Indians who had been relocated to Kansas after the Indian Removal Act of 1830. Topics mentioned within the chronology include warfare among relocated tribes, the arrival of white emigrants, disease, mission buildings, and treaties ceding land to the United States government.


Communicable disease classroom chart

Communicable disease classroom chart
Creator: Kansas. Board of Health
Date: Between 1960 and 1962
A classroom chart listing communicable diseases. The material was taken from the rules and regulations of the Kansas State Board of Health. Diseases listed include chickenpox, diphtheria, measles, mumps, scarlet fever, and whooping cough. Also listed are the symptoms, mode of spread, and basic control measures.


Cowboys bathing in a pond, Seward County, Kansas

Cowboys bathing in a pond, Seward County, Kansas
Creator: Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936
Date: Between 1891 and 1912
This is a view of cowboys bathing in a pond in Seward County, Kansas. Also visible are other cowboys, horses, and a chuckwagon.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: January 30, 1859
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, who, accompanied by Mrs. Edward C. K. Garvey, had returned to Meadville, Pennsylvania to give birth to her second child. Meanwhile, Cyrus Holliday (who was Vice President of the upper territorial legislative body, the Council) had passed four bills, including one establishing Topeka as the Shawnee county seat. He bought new clothes for the session, since Lawrence had become more refined, with a new hotel. Holliday mentioned emigration to Pikes Peak, the Topeka bridge, trouble in L[i]nn county, and meeting three women, Mrs. Smith, Mrs. [Robert] Morrow, and Mrs. O'Donell (possibly Mrs. William O'Donnall) in Lawrence. He proposed that Liz, Mary Holliday's younger sister, return with her.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: March 31, 1859
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, who had returned to Meadville, Pennsylvania to give birth to their second child, Charles. Cyrus had been joined in Kansas Territory by his mother and two brothers, James T. and George K. Holliday. Cyrus sadly told of his mother's death at George's home in Wakarusa, Kansas Territory. He suggested that Mary wait to return to Topeka until May 1st, when Alfred Huidekoper of Meadville would issue him a loan. Cyrus also mentioned his political aspirations and two upcoming elections, the first at the Osawatomie Republican Convention, the second for delegates to the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: August 12, 1855
Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania of his journey to Kansas City to obtain a land warrant for Topeka and to attend the Free State Convention. Two of his articles had been published in The Herald of Freedom, a Lawrence newspaper, and he sent copies. Mentioning political difficulties, Holliday suggested that his wife wait until fall to travel to Kansas. He rented out his cabin in Topeka for profit. A deadly cholera epidemic at Fort Riley had ended.


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