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Admit Me Free flag

Admit Me Free flag
Date: 1856
In 1856 this cotton and wool flag was used by Walter Whitehead in a rally at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, for Republican presidential nominee John C. Fremont. The oversized 33rd star and the words, "Admit Me Free" in the canton of the flag are in support of Kansas admittance as a free state. It was also used in the 1860 presidential campaign for Abraham Lincoln and other political campaigns.


A local history of Jerome Township, Gove County, Kansas

A local history of Jerome Township, Gove County, Kansas
Creator: Baker, Fred
Date: 1918
This is a local history of Jerome Township, Gove County, Kansas, as recollected by Fred Baker, Gove City, Kansas. Baker wrote this sketch and submitted it in March 1918 to the Golden Belt Educational Association at Hays, Kansas, and was awarded a prize. Also included is a letter from Judge J.C. Ruppenthal, Russell, Kansas, to William Connelly, Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas, who received the sketch from Baker and wished for it to be donated into the Society's holdings.


Annals of Kansas, April, 1856

Annals of Kansas, April, 1856
Creator: Wilder, Daniel Webster, 1832-1911
Date: April, 1856


Charles Robinson to J. C. Fremont

Charles Robinson to J. C. Fremont
Creator: Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894
Date: July 28, 1856
While a prisoner at Camp Sackett near Lecompton, Kansas Territory, Charles Robinson informs Fremont that James Emery was traveling east and should be used in Fremont's presidential campaign as a stump speaker as he "can do good service to the cause." Robinson also indicates that he did not know if the Pierce administration had decided whether or not to hang Robinson and his fellow prisoners.


Cyrus K. Holliday to Mary Holliday

Cyrus K. Holliday to Mary Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: October 19, 1856
Cyrus K. Holliday writes from Monongahela House in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. John C. Fremont had lost the state election, and Cyrus hopes to bolster support by speaking in the counties along the way to Philadelphia. Cyrus has met Judge Church, D. A. Finney, and J. W. Farrelly from northwestern Pennsylvania. Cyrus decides that Mary and their daughter proabably would not go to Kansas Territory that fall.


Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900
Date: October 17, 1856
Three days after the Pennsylvania state election, Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Monongahela House, a hotel in Pittsburgh, PA to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville. The election results were unofficial, and Cyrus hoped that John C. Fremont, republican presidential candidate, had won at least by a slim majority, if not by the expected large margin. Concerned about the November 4th national election, Cyrus anticipated fraud in Kansas Territory and prayed that the people would "do right." He mentioned the counties in which he had spoken; his next stop, Philadelphia; and his planned return to counties near Meadville.


Fremont Club banner

Fremont Club banner
Date: 1856
Banner was used in the Presidential campaign of 1856 by the Fremont Club of Lancaster, New Hampshire to show support for Kansas.


General Order No. 9

General Order No. 9
Creator: Kansas. Militia
Date: August 23, 1861
General Order No. 9, issued by commander of the Western Department, United States Army, Major General John C. Fremont, authorizes Governor Robinson to raise three regiments of volunteers during the Civil War. On the three regiments, one will serve as the Home Guard while the other two will serve in New Mexico.


Henry Woods to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Henry Woods to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday
Creator: Woods, Henry
Date: October 2, 1856
Henry Woods, member of the Township Meetings and Speakers committee of the Fremont Club, asked Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, give an address that evening in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Holliday had returned to his home state to speak on behalf of Republican presidential nominee John Charles Fremont, who supported the free state cause. Woods' brief letter was written on the back of a printed list of subcommittees of the Fremont County Executive Committee. Evidentially, Woods had enclosed with the letter a note from G. E. Appleton of Birmingham, which requested that Holliday speak there the following day.


Hiram Hill to Charles A. Wright

Hiram Hill to Charles A. Wright
Creator: Hill, Hiram, 1804-
Date: June 18, 1856
Hiram Hill wrote from Williamsburg, Massachusetts, to Charles Wright in Kansas Territory. Hill expressed disbelief at the reports of violence and destruction that crossed his ears, but accepted them to be true based on his experiences in Missouri the previous winter. To Hill, it appeared that they would have to "take the field to Regain our Liberties that have been struck down". He also referred to actions of the National Republican Convention in Philadelphia (which named John Fremont as their presidential candidate) and dubbed the nomination "their only hope -- short of a Bloody Revolution".


Hiram Hill to Samuel Newell Simpson

Hiram Hill to Samuel Newell Simpson
Creator: Hill, Hiram, 1804-
Date: July 12, 1856
Hiram Hill wrote from Williamsburgh, Massachusetts, to Samuel Simpson in Kansas Territory, suggesting to him at length that he write more slowly and clearly as Hill was having trouble deciphering his news regarding West Lawrence. Hill told Simpson that the people of his area were aroused enough by the continuing accounts of border ruffian violence that they called a meeting and raised $300 for Kansas. He believed that the future of the situation rested with the upcoming presidential election, "free Kansas free speech & free press & Fremont", to keep Congress from passing a "Compromises" bill with slavery.


History of Gove County, Kansas

History of Gove County, Kansas
Creator: Harrington, Wynne Powers, 1870-1943
Date: December 11, 1917
This is an historical sketch of Gove County, Kansas, written by W.P. Harrington. The history covers early European exploration and continues until the end of the nineteenth century.


John C. Fremont

John C. Fremont
Creator: Brady's National Portrait Galleries
In 1856, John C. Fremont was the first presidential candidate for the newly formed Republican party, which endorsed an antislavery platform. Fremont served in the U.S. Topographical Corps and participated in a number of expeditions that explored the "West." He played a controversial role in the conquest of California, and he served as a Major General during the Civil War.


John C. Fremont

John C. Fremont
Creator: Putnam Brothers
Date: Between 1855 and 1860
This is an engraving of John C. Fremont.


John C. Fremont political ribbon

John C. Fremont political ribbon
Date: 1856
Kansas statehood was a major issue in the 1856 presidential election. John C. Fremont was the candidate of the newly formed Republican Party, which wanted Kansas admitted as a free state.


John C. Fremont to Charles Robinson

John C. Fremont to Charles Robinson
Creator: Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890
Date: March 17, 1856
Writing from New York, on March 17, 1856, three months before accepting the Republican Party nomination for president, John C. Fremont sent this letter of support and encouragement to Charles Robinson in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. The two men had participated together in the political affairs of California a few years earlier, and Fremont compares the current controversy over the "Kansas question" with their previous experiences. Fremont briefly addresses Robinson's questions about a possible presidential bid. Fremont addresses Robinson as governor but Robinson was governor of the "extra-legal" territorial government. He was not one of the territorial governors appointed by the President.


Jonathan Watson, J.H. Baker, Thomas S. Chase and E.H. Chase to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Jonathan Watson, J.H. Baker, Thomas S. Chase and E.H. Chase to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday
Creator: Watson, Jonathan
Date: July 29, 1856
This letter, sent by a Republican Party caucus committee in Titusville, Pennsylvania, requested that Cyrus K. Holliday speak at a convention in August. They described a local political shift, as Democrats agreed to support the Republican presidential nominee. Cyrus already had left Topeka on July 7th, intending to bring his wife, Mary, and daughter, Lillie, to Kansas Territory. Responding to invitations such as this, Cyrus spoke about 130 times on behalf of the Republican presidential candidate, John Charles Fremont, who supported admittance of Kansas as a free state. Though speaking mostly in Pennsylvania, Cyrus saw little of his family until after the November election, which Fremont lost.


Joseph S. Chick interview

Joseph S. Chick interview
Creator: Cone, W. W.
Date: October 19, 1908
This item contains fifteen pages of notes taken by Zu Adams during an interview with Kansas City businessman Joseph S. Chick that took place at Kansas City's Union Station in October 1908. The interview covers details of Chick's early years in Kansas, the settlers he lived near, a description of the style of Kaw houses, a brief description of Francis Chouteau, his work finding arrowheads, and other incidents from his past.


Julia Ann Stinson correspondence

Julia Ann Stinson correspondence
Creator: Stinson, Julia Ann Beauchemin, 1834-1925
Date: 1895-1914
Statements and recollections of Julia Ann Stinson, wife of Thomas Nesbit Stinson. Julia was born in 1834 at the Shawnee Methodist Indian Mission where she was raised and educated. It was there that she met Thomas Stinson and married him in 1850. A photograph taken on her wedding day is believed to be the first photographic portrait taken west of the Missouri River. Her husband was adopted into the tribe and the couple received a land grant of about 800 acres from a treaty between the U.S. government and the Shawnee Indians. The Stinson's made their home on the land they acquired through the Shawnee settlement. Julia Stinson claimed a relationship to the Shawnee warrior Tecumseh. Shawnee Indians supposedly kidnapped her grandfather who married a cousin of Tecumseh. This is how the future town earned its name. The couple built a home there, established a profitable trading post and ran a post office. Included in these documents are reminiscences of encounters with Andrew Reeder, Chief Abram Burnett, and John C. Fremont.


Logan County history

Logan County history
Creator: Ruppenthal, J. C. (Jacob Christian), 1869-1964
Date: 1914
This is a listing and description of various locations and points of interest in Logan County. Castle Rock, the Butterfield/Wallace trail, Russell Springs, and a story on General George Custer are included.


Map of routes to the gold region of Western Kansas

Map of routes to the gold region of Western Kansas
Creator: Berthoud, Edward L.
Date: 1858
A map depicting the northern, central, and southern routes to the gold region of western Kansas compiled from the reports, surveys and exporations of Howard Stansbury, John C. Fremont, William H. Emory, and Edward L. Bryan.


Marian S. Hand to Samuel and Florella Adair

Marian S. Hand to Samuel and Florella Adair
Creator: Hand, Marian S.
Date: July 7, 1856
Marian S. (Brown) Hand, Rawsonville, Ohio, writes her sister, Florella Brown Adair, and brother-in-law, Samuel Adair, inquiring about events in Kansas Territory and about their brother, John Brown, and his sons. She says that Kansas Aid Societies and Ladies Aid Societies were forming to help families that suffered in Kansas Territory. Her husband, T. W. Hand, adds a note to the end of the letter discussing politics. He feels that Fremont would be elected President and that would insure freedom in Kansas and the North.


Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908
Date: August 29, 1856
Mary Holliday wrote from Meadville, Pennsylvania to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, who was presently touring Pennsylvania to speak in support of Republican presidential nominee John C. Fremont. Mary mentioned Mr. Howe, L. Lord, and Alfred Huidekoper, all friends of Cyrus. William D. Paul, who lived in Shawnee County, Kansas Territory had written. Quoting from his letter, Mary reported a skirmish between free state and proslavery men at Franklin, in Douglas County. Henry C. Titus, colonel of proslavery troops, and Israel B. Donalson, U. S. marshal, had been taken prisoner. Governor Wilson Shannon had negotiated a treaty. Mary also mentioned her ill health, and she hoped that Cyrus was well.


Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908
Date: August 31, 1856
Mary Holliday of Meadville, Pennsylvania reported the contents of a letter her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, had received from William D. Paul of Topeka, Kansas Territory. Cyrus was speaking in New Castle, PA on the behalf of Republican presidential candidate John C. Fremont. Paul wrote that Harry G. Young was living in Cyrus' Topeka house. Milton C. Dickey and Dr. George A. Cutler had returned to Topeka without weapons, to the disappointment of the "Topeka boys," who anticipated conflict with Missourians. Mary recommended reading the New York Times. She wrote of her dissatisfaction with their separation and readiness to emigrate to Kansas Territory.


Mary Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Mary Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday
Creator: Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908
Date: October 23, 1856
Mary Holliday of Meadville, Pennsylvania, wrote to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, likely at Philadelphia. She had returned from a trip to Wooster, Ohio. She reported improved Kansas Territory conditions from one of William D. Paul's letters. Mary was eager to leave for K. T., especially since many Meadville children, including Lillie, were ill, and requested that Cyrus buy household articles. Mary reported that McFarland of Democrat James Buchanan's campaign had bribed voters. Could women vote, John C. Fremont would be elected, she declared. She enclosed a letter to free state governor William Y. Roberts and instructed him to visit Charley Ottinger.


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