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Arcadia mining camp, Crawford County, Kansas

Arcadia mining camp, Crawford County, Kansas
Date: 1914-1969
A photograph of the Arcadia mining camp. Arcadia was originally founded as Hathaway in 1857 a half mile north of the current town. The post office was later moved to the site of a railroad siding in approximately 1876. Arcadia is located on the Kansas and Missouri state line, in Crawford County, and is roughly twenty miles northeast of Pittsburg, Kansas. Photographs include images of a school, churches, street scenes, school basketball team, and mining operations.


Bible school in Houston, Texas

Bible school in Houston, Texas
Date: 1906
This is a photograph showing the house where Charles Fox Parham held his Bible school in Houston, Texas. Parham was the central figure in the development of the Pentecostal faith. He moved to Kansas with his family as a child. As an adult, his religious activities were headquartered in Topeka, Kansas. The photograph was copied from The Life of Charles F. Parham Founder of the Apostolic Faith Movement by Sarah E. Parham.


Stone's Folly, Topeka, Kansas

Stone's Folly, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1899 and 1901
This black and white photograph shows Stone's Folly at 17th and Stone Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Construction on the three-story eighteen room mansion began around 1887 when Erastus R. Stone purchased a thirty acre tract of land west of Washburn College. The castle like structure embodied Stone's vision of the finest mansion in Kansas. Unfortunately, an economic depression and a drought halted construction on the home. Without the financial means to finish the mansion, Stone's castle became know as Stone's Folly and was eventually sold to the American Bible Society of Philadelphia. The home, never occupied by Stone and his family, remained vacant for over a decade until 1900 when the Rev. Charles Fox Parham rented the residence for his Bethel Bible College. From October of 1900 to July of 1901, Parham and his wife Sarah used the home as a gathering place for the teachings of the Pentecostal faith. When their lease on Stone's Folly was not renewed the mansion was sold, on July 20, 1901, to bootlegger Harry Croft who converted the residence into a roadhouse. Tragically, a mysterious fire destroyed the gothic structure on December 6, 1901. Today, there are no remnants of the mansion but the site is the home of the Most Pure Heart of Mary Catholic Church.


Stone's Folly, Topeka, Kansas

Stone's Folly, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1889 and 1901
An east view of Stone's Folly located at 17th and Stone Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Construction on the three-story eighteen room mansion began around 1887 when Erastus R. Stone purchased a thirty acre tract of land west of Washburn College. The castle-like structure with its ornate appearance was Stone's vision of the finest mansion in the state of Kansas. Unfortunately, an economic depression and a drought halted construction on the home. Without the financial means to finish the mansion, Stone's castle became know as Stone's Folly and was eventually sold to the American Bible Society of Philadelphia. The home, never occupied by Stone and his family, remained vacant for over a decade until 1900 when the Rev. Charles Fox Parham rented the residence for his Bethel Bible College. From October of 1900 to July of 1901, Parham and his wife Sarah used the home as a gathering place for the teachings of the Pentecostal faith. When their lease on Stone's Folly was not renewed the mansion was sold, on July 20, 1901, to Harry Croft, a bootlegger who converted the residence into a roadhouse. Tragically, a mysterious fire destroyed the Gothic structure on December 6, 1901. Today, there are no reminders of the mansion but the site is the home of the Most Pure Heart of Mary Catholic Church.


Stone's Folly, Topeka, Kansas

Stone's Folly, Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1889 and 1901
This sepia colored photograph shows the Stone's Folly at 17th and Stone Streets in Topeka, Kansas. Construction on the three-story eighteen room mansion began around 1887 when Erastus R. Stone purchased a thirty acre tract of land west of Washburn College. The castle like structure embodied Stone's vision of the finest mansion in Kansas. Unfortunately, an economic depression and a drought halted construction on the home. Without the financial means to finish the mansion, Stone's castle became known as Stone's Folly and was eventually sold to the American Bible Society of Philadelphia. The home, never occupied by Stone and his family, remained vacant for over a decade until 1900 when the Rev. Charles Fox Parham rented the residence for his Bethel Bible College. From October of 1900 to July of 1901, Parham and his wife Sarah used the home as a gathering place for the teachings of the Pentecostal faith. When their lease on Stone's Folly was not renewed the mansion was sold, on July 20, 1901, to bootlegger Harry Croft who converted the residence into a roadhouse. Tragically, a mysterious fire destroyed the gothic structure on December 6, 1901. Today there are no remnants of the mansion but the site is the home of the Most Pure Heart of Mary Catholic Church.


Topeka Provident Association building Topeka, Kansas

Topeka Provident Association building Topeka, Kansas
Date: Between 1898 and 1920
This sepia colored photograph shows the Bethel Healing Home that later housed the Topeka Provident Association. Located at the corner of Fourth and Jackson streets in Topeka, Kansas, the building was used from 1898 to 1900 by faith healers Charles and Sarah Parham as a Christian center. The ground floor of the Bethel Healing Home furnished a large chapel, public reading room, and printing office where the "Apostolic Faith" paper was published. After the Parhams left Topeka to conduct Pentacostal revivals, the building housed the Topeka Provident Association to assist victims recovering from the 1903 flood. Available services included cooking and sewing classes for girls, a boy's club, a library, and a day care center.


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