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Showing 1 - 17 of 17 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Annals of Kansas, January - February, 1855

Annals of Kansas, January - February, 1855
Creator: Wilder, Daniel Webster, 1832-1911
Date: January, 1855 through February, 1855
D. W. Wilder's "Annals of Kansas," published in 1886, provides a day-by-day chronicle of significant events in Kansas. These are digital images of Annals of Kansas entries for the territorial period of 1854-1861.


Battle of Wounded Knee and Pine Ridge, South Dakota

Battle of Wounded Knee and Pine Ridge, South Dakota
Creator: Northwestern Photographic Company
Date: 1890 and 1891
Twelve photographs showing scenes of the Sioux Indians at Pine Ridge Indian Agency and the Battle of Wounded Knee, South Dakota. During this time, the U. S. Army sought to curb the Sioux Ghost Dance. They killed Sitting Bull and pursued Big Foot. He led his people south to seek protection at the Pine Ridge Reservation. The army intercepted the band on December 28 and brought them to the edge of Wounded Knee Creek to camp. On December 29, 1890, the U.S. Army attacked Big Foot's camp killing him and approximately 300 Sioux. The Battle of Wounded Knee is considered the last major conflict between U.S. troops and Native Americans. A number of Chiefs in the photographs are identified on the specific image. The backs of several of the photographs have advertisements for the photographic company which was located in Chadron, Nebraska; for the Minne Pazuta Springs credited with curing epilepsy; and for E. F. King, the Black Hills Jeweler located in Deadwood, South Dakota.


Carte du chemin de fer Athison, Topeka et Santa Fe, aves ses ramifications

Carte du chemin de fer Athison, Topeka et Santa Fe, aves ses ramifications
Creator: Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company
Date: Between 1884 and 1894
This advertising circular and map published by the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad is written in French. It promotes immigration and land development in the Arkansas River Valley in the State of Kansas. One side of the brochure describes the territory and the advantages of further development of three million acres of land. The reverse side has a map of the central portion of the United States, from New York City on the East coast to Colorado and New Mexico. An itinerary describes how to travel, by railroad, to the Arkansas River Valley, from twenty-seven cities in the East and Midwest. Etchings of the Cow Creek valley in Rice County, Kansas, and the Arkansas River valley at Great Bend, Kansas, accompany the map.


Esther Means to Governor Fred Hall

Esther Means to Governor Fred Hall
Creator: Means, Esther
Date: February 15, 1956
Esther Means of Charleston, South Carolina, writes to Kansas Governor Fred Hall of Topeka arguing that the U. S. African American population should be distributed equally across all of the United States at the rate of ten whites to one black. She claims that according to the 1950 census Kansas's black population was below this standard. Means encouraged Governor Hall to accept any black person wanting to migrate to Kansas. The mid to late 1950s was a time a social unrest in the South. Events such as Brown vs. Board of Education, the murder of Emmett Till, and the Montgomery bus boycott challenged southern customs concerning black equality and helped propel the nation into the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.


Friendship quilt

Friendship quilt
Date: between 1845 and 1865
Chintz friendship quilt in Broderie Perse style. Blocks are appliquéd with chintz cut-outs of floral sprays, wreaths, garlands, and a few animals. Hand-stitched, appliqued, and quilted. Each block is inked with a signature; most of these people were listed as residents of James Island, South Carolina, in the 1860 census. Reverend George T. Holyoke found this quilt in a Union army camp during the Civil War when he was a private in the 45th Illinois Infantry. This may have occurred in South Carolina where the 45th closed out the war on Sherman's March. After the war, Holyoke became a Congregational minister and moved to Kansas with his wife.


Harold R. Fatzer to J. Lindsay Almond Jr.

Harold R. Fatzer to J. Lindsay Almond Jr.
Creator: Fatzer, Harold R
Date: July 13, 1951
In this letter, Attorney General of Kansas Harold Fatzer responds to a letter by J. Lindsay Almond, Attorney General of Virginia. Almond had inquired about a school segregation suit against the Topeka Board of Education. Fatzer mentions a similar case in South Carolina, Briggs v. Elliott, and states that the plaintiffs in the Topeka case were arguing that segregation violated their rights under the 14th Amendment. Virginia would later join Kansas as one of the five states represented in the case Brown v. Board of Education. This case reached the U. S. Supreme Court, and in 1954 segregated school facilities were declared unconstitutional. Attached to this letter is Almond's initial inquiry.


Henry Isely diary

Henry Isely diary
Date: 1863
This diary was written by Henry Isely, a member of Company C, Sixty-seventh Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He enlisted in 1862 as a private and served over three years. Isely tells about the capture of Morris Island, the charge on Fort Wagner, and the siege of Fort Sumter. After the attack at Fort Wagner, Isely developed typhoid fever and was in a field hospital on Morris Island for six weeks. He describes his physical problems resulting from typhoid. Isely recovered and rejoined his company. He participated in many battles and in the end, witnessed the surrender of General Lee at Appomattox Courthouse on April 9, 1865. Isely was mustered out at Richmond on October 16, 1865. In 1870, he moved to Brown County, Kansas, where he bought farm land. In addition to farming, he became involved in politics and, in 1872, he was elected Township Clerk of Walnut Township, Brown County, Kansas. In 1873, he was elected County Clerk of Brown County and reelected in 1875 and 1877. Isely ran for the Kansas House of Representatives in 1882 and was elected by a sixty vote majority. In 1883, he was elected to the Kansas Senate.


James Henry Hammond of South Carolina, speech

James Henry Hammond of South Carolina, speech
Creator: Hammond, James H.
Date: March 4, 1858
Senator James Hammond offered this speech as a rebuttal to those recently presented by Senators in oppositon to his perspective, questioning their argument that the Lecompton Constitutional Convention was a tool of the Territorial Government to maintain the dominance of proslavery policy. Hammond maintained instead that the Convention was "an assembly of the people in their highest sovereign capacity" and thus acted with the will of the majority of Kansas citizens. He also indicated that the South did not feel threated by the possibility of Kansas becoming a free state, as their exports and businesses were well off even without the increased foreign slave trade that Kansas potentially could bring.


Josiah Miller

Josiah Miller
Although born in South Carolina, Josiah Miller was a free state supporter. He attended college in Indiana and law school in New York. He came to Kansas in 1854 and on January 5, 1855, established the Kansas Free State newspaper in Lawrence. The newspaper office was destroyed by order of the territorial government on May 21, 1856 because is was deemed a nuisance. He was capturned by Buford's proslavery forces and was tried for treason against the state of South Carolina. He supported John C. Fremont. In 1857, he was elected probate judge of Douglas County, Kansas Territory.


Kenneth Gaines interview, Columbia, South Carolina

Kenneth Gaines interview, Columbia, South Carolina
Creator: Gaines, Kenneth
Date: September 03, 2011
This transcript of an interview with Kenneth Gaines is part of an oral history project entitled "Patterns of Change, Edwards County, Kansas 1950-1970" conducted by the Kinsley Public Library. The project was supported by a Kansas Humanities Council Heritage Grant. Gaines talks of his family, education, and his memories of the Edwards County community.


Lawson Wilson to Lewis Allen Alderson

Lawson Wilson to Lewis Allen Alderson
Date: December 1831-November 1832
These three letters are from Lawson Wilson in Lincoln County, North Carolina, to his friend, Lewis Allen Alderson, a student at the University of Ohio in Athens. In his letters, Wilson reminisces about time spent in Athens and seeks news about his old acquaintances. Wilson states that "Nullification has been making a great noise in the South," regarding the ability of individual states to abolish federal laws, particularly relating to tariffs and slave laws in South Carolina. He also mentions that the gold mines in the region are making "a great bustle" and congratulates Alderson on his recent marriage. Alderson moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.


Mitchell's Travellers Guide through the United States

Mitchell's Travellers Guide through the United States
Creator: Mitchell, Samuel Augustus
Date: 1834
Map of the United States showing roads, distances, steam boat and canal routes. The vicinities of major cities are inset, including Cincinnati, Albany, New Orleans, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Charleston, and Washington, D. C. Towns are indexed on the back of the map. This map is provided through a co-operative project between the Lecompton Historical Society and the Kansas Historical Society. Partial funding was provided by the Ross and Margaret Wulfkuhle Charitable Trust and the Freedom's Frontier National Heritage Area.


Mr. and Mrs. Dwight H. Woolf, the Walking Woolfs

Mr. and Mrs. Dwight H. Woolf, the Walking Woolfs
Date: 1909
Here are five postcards showing Mr. and Mrs. Dwight H. Woolf, also known as the Walking Woolfs. They wrote a book titled Tramping and Camping published by S. I. Meseraull & Son, Kansas City, Kansas. The book tells of Mr. Woolf's failing health in 1909, when he was a 107 pound music publisher. His doctor fold him he must get outside to revive his health. With his wife's encouragement, they started walking first to the Ozarks and back to Kansas City, Kansas, three hundred miles; then a thousand mile trip to New York, and finally an eight thousand mile walk through the South and East and back to Kansas City, Kansas. They were accompanied by their horse Dolly and dog Don. The book is available at the Kansas State Historical Society


Samuel Baker to John P. St. John

Samuel Baker to John P. St. John
Creator: Baker, Samuel
Date: March 7, 1882
Samuel Baker of Columbia, South Carolina, wrote this letter to Kansas governor St. John requesting information about housing for freed blacks. Apparently, there were around 10,000 blacks in South Carolina wanting to escape racial oppression in the South, and Baker desired more information and advice about relocating these people to Kansas. In addition to his service as governor, St. John also served on the Board of Directors of the Kansas Freedmen's Relief Association.


Southern Rights flag

Southern Rights flag
Date: 1856
Pro-slavery forces carried this cotton flag while attacking the anti-slavery stronghold of Lawrence in Douglas County, Kansas Territory. Douglas County Sheriff Samuel Jones led the group that sacked Lawrence on May 21, 1856. A group of South Carolinians led by Captain F.G. Palmer and known as the Palmetto Guards participated in the attack, and flew their "Southern Rights" flag over the Herald of Freedom newspaper offices and the Free State Hotel before setting fire to and destroying the buildings. On Sept. 11, 1856, Palmer's men--and their flag--were captured on Slough Creek, near Oskaloosa, Jefferson County, by Free-State men led by Col. James Harvey.


Thomas C. Wells to Sarah Elizabeth Clarke Wells

Thomas C. Wells to Sarah Elizabeth Clarke Wells
Creator: Wells, Thomas Clarke
Date: April 3, 1856
After spending part of much of the winter back East, Wells returned to Kansas Territory in April, 1856, beginning this letter home from aboard the steamer "James H. Lucas" and finishing it on April 13 at Juniata, near Fort Riley, Kansas Territory. He comments on the trip by rail and boat and on the fact that there are "Quite a number of people on board from South Carolina and Georgia going to Kansas." But they would not last long, he states, and "The free state people must eventually conquer--the South cannot compete with the North in sending emigrants." Wells' plans upon his return are to sell his Juniata property and take one closer to Manhattan, Kansas Territory, which he describes as having done in a subsequent letter.


Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Charley Ewing

Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Charley Ewing
Creator: Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896
Date: May 1, 1860
In a letter to Charley Ewing, his younger brother, Thomas Ewing made some interesting observations about national presidential politics and parties. He was hopeful that the Republican Party in convention at Chicago would nominate a good "National man," but if they didn't he would "hope for the election of [Stephen A.] Douglas."


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