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Absalom White territorial loss claim

Absalom White territorial loss claim
Creator: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
Report of H.L. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas, contained in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set of congressional and executive documents. Absalom White filed claim #246 for the loss of an arm as a result of being struck by a bullet at a battle with southerners near the H. T. Titus [probably Henry C.] home in Douglas County. The arm was subsequently amputated. The claim was not allowed on the grounds that White was "engaged in rebellion and making unwarranted attack on the person and property of a private citizen." Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.


Abstract of journals from the 1845 Kearny Expedition

Abstract of journals from the 1845 Kearny Expedition
Date: 1846
This excerpt from the congressional report of the Secretary of War includes the abstracts of two journals, one by Lieutenant William B. Franklin, a topographical engineer, and another by Lieutenant H.S. Turner of the 1st dragoons stationed at Fort Leavenworth. Under the command of Stephen Kearny, the 1st dragoons and their accompanying engineers left Fort Leavenworth on a military march, heading northwest on what would become the Oregon Trail, down along the Rocky Mountains to Mexican territory, and back up via the Santa Fe Trail. This march was intended as a display of the United States' military power to both native tribes and the British government (which at this time was exerting its authority over Oregon Territory). For the most part this abstract details their route, but it does include a transcription of a conversation between Kearny and a Sioux chief named Bull Tail.


Affidavit of John Smith

Affidavit of John Smith
Creator: United States. Congress. Senate
Date: January 15, 1865
This affidavit given by John Smith, an interpreter for the United States military, was presented to the military commission investigating the massacre of Cheyenne Indians at Sand Creek, Colorado, in 1864. Smith's account focuses primary on the events prior to the massacre, including the attitudes of the Cheyenne leaders One Eye and Black Kettle. The affidavit is part of a larger report containing evidence obtained at this hearing, titled Report of the Secretary of War, Communicating, In compliance with a resolution of the Senate of February 4, 1867, a copy of the evidence taken at Denver and Fort Lyon, Colorado Territory, by a military commission, ordered to inquire into the Sand Creek massacre, November, 1864.


Affidavits of colored men, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

Affidavits of colored men, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts
Creator: United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus
Date: 1880
The Senate select committee charged with investigating the causes of the Exodus included this list of sworn affidavits in their report. The affidavits are given by ten black men and one black woman who outlined their treatment while living in Louisiana. Each affidavit includes their full name and parish (county) of residence. Although this source does not directly refer to Kansas, many Exodusters who came to Kansas during the post-Civil War period came from Louisiana.


An Act to provide for the election of Delegates to a Convention to frame a State Constitution

An Act to provide for the election of Delegates to a Convention to frame a State Constitution
Creator: Deitzler, George Washington, 1826-1884
Date: 1858
This act pertains to the election of delegates to the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention in the Kansas Territory.


An act defining and providing for the punishment of certain crimes therein named

An act defining and providing for the punishment of certain crimes therein named
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: 1861
Chapter 27, Section 1 of the General Laws of the State of Kansas (1861) provides for punishment by death for any person convicted of treason against the state. The legislature enacted the law at its first session ending March 26, 1861. The following year, the Legislature enacted a death penalty for persons convicted of first degree murder. These laws demonstrate the state's initial stance on capital punishment.


An act regulating crimes and punishment of crimes against the persons of individuals

An act regulating crimes and punishment of crimes against the persons of individuals
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: 1862
Chapter 33, Section 3 of the General Laws of the State of Kansas (1862) provides for punishment by death for persons convicted of murder in the first degree. The legislature passed the law at its second annual session ending March 6, 1862. The previous year, the legislature passed a death penalty law for persons convicted of treason against the state. These laws demonstrates the state's initial stance on capital punishment.


An act regulating the diversion, appropriation, storage and distribution of water for industrial purposes

An act regulating the diversion, appropriation, storage and distribution of water for industrial purposes
Creator: Kansas. Legislature
Date: 1891
In this bill (H.B. 602), the House Committee on Irrigation drafted legislation to control and regulate the rights of water in Kansas. Articles within the bill include, Diversion and Appropriation of water for industrial purposes, rights of use of water, right of way, disposal of seepage water, creation of irrigation ditches, construction and maintenance and operation of works, regulation of rates and compensation, and unlawful interference. The bill passed both the house and senate and was signed into law March 10, 1891.


An act to incorporate the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company

An act to incorporate the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company
Creator: Massachusetts. Legislature. House of Representatives
Date: April 13, 1854
This law was passed by the Massachusetts House of Representatives, declaring that the Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company was an official company in the state of Massachusetts. It describes the purpose of the company and lists the men involved in its operation. The Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Company was the predecessor to the New England Emigrant Aid Company, which was founded in March, 1855.


An act to regulate the infliction of the death penalty and to amend an act to establish a code of criminal procedure

An act to regulate the infliction of the death penalty and to amend an act to establish a code of criminal procedure
Creator: Kansas Legislature.
Date: 1872
Following the controversial, public execution of William Dickson in Leavenworth (1870), the state legislature passed Senate Bill 18 (1872) to regulate procedures for carrying out a death sentence. The act provides that the punishment of death must be by "hanging by the neck." The act also provides that the time of the execution must be ordered by the governor. In effect, this law imposed a ban on state executions since no governor ever ordered an execution between 1872-1907, the year the law was repealed. Dickson's execution would be the last conducted under state law for 73 years.


Ann Hopper territorial loss claim

Ann Hopper territorial loss claim
Creator: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
This claim appears in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set, 2nd Session, 35th Congress, Miscellaneous Documents, 1858-1859, and was reported by H.L. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas in 1857. Claim #240 was filed on behalf of Ann Hopper, who lived with her son John L. Hopper, near Lawrence. The items listed were destroyed or stolen in August and September, 1856, and included animals, crops and household items. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.


A proposed temperance law

A proposed temperance law
Creator: Buchan, William Johnston
Date: 1883
A proposed temperance law suggested by W. J. Buchan; which would later on in 1883 become Senate Bill number 74. This proposal would prohibit the manufacture and sale of intoxicating liquors except for medical, scientific, and mechanical purposes, and to punish those were caught being intoxicated.


A study made of 719 rural rehabilitation families relative to their standard of living

A study made of 719 rural rehabilitation families relative to their standard of living
Creator: Kansas Emergency Relief Committee
Date: 1935
The Kansas Emergency Relief Committee was created in July 1932 to obtain and administer federal emergency loans made available to states through Herbert Hoover's Emergency Relief and Construction Act of 1932. President Franklin Roosevelt expanded on this act with the Federal Emergency Relief Administration (FERA) in 1933, leading the Kansas committee to change its name to the Kansas Emergency Relief Committee (KERC). Under the direction of Kansas's new governor, Alf Landon, the KERC managed direct and work relief programs in Kansas including emergency education, transient relief, rural rehabilitation, drought relief, and a slew of public works projects including the construction of farm ponds and lakes, and the renovation and construction of public buildings, roads, and quarries. This is a brief report on the "standard of living of 719 rural rehabilitation families in Kansas."


A study made of 719 rural rehabilitation families relative to their standard of living

A study made of 719 rural rehabilitation families relative to their standard of living
Creator: Kansas Emergency Relief Committee
Date: 1935
This study was compiled by Conie Foote, supervisor of home economics, and her county home advisers. The report includes an introductory note from Foote, who states that the goal of this study is to provide the rural rehabilitation program with essential information about the needs of relief clients during the Dust Bowl years. The study addresses several questions, including: "What is the present standard of living of the families making application for rural rehabilitation loans? Is there a standard below which a family cannot live and maintain health and efficiency?" To answer these questions, the report includes statistics, such as charts documenting housing conditions, the number of applicants in each household, the items of household equipment required by relief families, and the number of persons needing medical care.


Benjamin D. Castleman territorial loss claim

Benjamin D. Castleman territorial loss claim
Creator: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
Report of H.L. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas, contained in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set of congressional and executive documents. Benjamin D. Castleman, Tecumseh, Shawnee County, presented claim #216 for losses suffered in August and September, 1856. He operated as a merchant so his claim listed groceries, clothing, dry goods, medicines, guns, hardware, books and stationery, and tin and glassware. He stated that the damage was caused by about 50 well armed men under the command of James H. Lane and another group of 200 men under the command of "Captains A. Jameson, Cleveland, and Charles Moffet." Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.


Benjamin S. Hancock territorial loss claim

Benjamin S. Hancock territorial loss claim
Creator: Strickler, Hiram Jackson
Date: 1859
Report of H.L. Strickler, Commissioner to Audit Claims of Citizens of the Territory of Kansas, contained in the U.S. Congressional Serial Set of congressional and executive documents. Benjamin S. Hancock submitted claim # 163 for agricultural equipment, livestock, and crops that were destroyed at various times in 1855 and 1856. His list of livestock and other items claim is very detailed. He lived near Lecompton in Douglas County. His losses were caused by the territorial militia under the command of several including William Martin, John Randolph, Colonel Titus, General Richardson, and General Stringfellow. Each claimant had to submit an itemized list and have two witnesses attest to the losses claimed. Even though many of these claims were approved for payment, no funds were ever appropriated or distributed.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1902

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1902
Creator: Kansas. State Charitable Institutions
Date: 1902
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item is the superintendent's report along with statistical tables on the school.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1904

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1904
Creator: Kansas. State Charitable Institutions
Date: 1904
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item is the superintendent's report, the chaplain's report, and statistical tables on the school.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1906

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1906
Creator: Kansas. Board of Control
Date: 1906
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Control of State Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from the superintendent, physician, chaplain, parole agent, and steward, as well as statistical tables on the school.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1908

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1908
Creator: Kansas. Board of Control
Date: 1908
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Control of State Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from the superintendent, chaplain, and parole agent, as well as statistical tables on the school.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1910

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1910
Creator: Kansas. Board of Control
Date: 1910
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Control of State Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from the superintendent, chaplain, and parole agent. General statistics on the school are also listed.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1912

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1912
Creator: Kansas. Board of Control
Date: 1912
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Control of State Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item are reports from the superintendent and parole agent. General statistics on the school are also listed.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1914

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1914
Creator: Kansas. Board of Corrections
Date: 1914
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. This item includes reports from the superintendent and parole agent. General statistics on the school are also listed.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1916

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1916
Creator: Kansas. Board of Corrections
Date: 1916
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item is the superintendent's report as well as general statistics on the school.


Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1918

Biennial report of the Boys Industrial School, 1918
Creator: Kansas. State Board of Administration
Date: 1918
The Kansas State Reform School, also known as the Industrial School for Boys, was established in 1879 by a legislative act that appropriated $35,000 for the erection of buildings, etc., in Topeka, Kansas. Control and supervision of the school was placed in the hands of the Board of Trustees of Charitable Institutions. The school was located 3 miles north of the capitol building on an original tract of 170 acres that was given by the city of Topeka. The west wing of the main building was opened on June 1, 1881. The school taught boys the rudiments of useful employment as a means of supporting themselves after being discharged from the facility. The boys learned, among other things, tailoring, shoe and harness making, woodworking of various kinds, baking, and printing. Information included in this item is the superintendent's report as well as general statistics on the school.


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