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People - Notable Kansans - Adams, F. G. (Franklin George), 1824-1899

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Address to the Voters of Kansas

Address to the Voters of Kansas
Creator: Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891
Date: September 25, 1867
The numerous authors of this pamphlet (Republicans) support the constitutional amendments to approve voting rights for blacks, for women, and to restrict voting rights to "loyal persons." They offer arguments for their position as well as criticizing the Democratic Party in Kansas for their opposition to these amendments. Forty five men signed the document, which was the result of a meeting in Lawrence. The following signed the document S. C. Pomeroy, Atchison; E. G. Ross, Lawrence; S. J. Crawford, Topeka; N. Green, Manhattan; Chas. Robinson, Lawrence; Geo T. Anthony, Leavenworth; Lewis Bodwell, Topeka; R. B. Taylor, editor Wyandotte Gazette; J. P. Root, Whandotte; James Rogers, Burlingame; S. Weaver, Editor Lecompton New Era; L. R. Elliott, Editor Atchison Daily Free Press; W. A. Starrett, Lawrence; Wm. Larimer, Jr., Leavenworth; John Ritchie, Topeka; John Ekin, Topeka; Sol. Miller, Editor White Cloud Chief; A. H. Foote, Lawrence; C. B. Lines, Wabaunsee; R. G. Elliott, Jefferson county; G. A. Crawford, Bourbon county; John Speer, Kansas Tribune; A. Low, Doniphan; R. W. Jenkins, Pottawatomie county; Ed. Russell, Leavenworth; J. H. Pillsbury, Editor Manhattan Independent; S. D. Houston, Manhattan; W. K. Marshall, Atchison; F. G. Adams, Kennekuk; P. L. Hubbard, Atchison; A. Hunting, Manhattan; J. B. Abbott, De Soto; Joseph Denison, Manhattan; T. H. Baker, Manhattan, H. W. Farnsworth, Topeka; I. H. Smith, Topeka; D. R. Anthony, Leavenworth; G. W. Higginbotham, Manhattan; John Pipher, Manhattan, R. L. Harford, Manhattan; Jas. Humphrey, Manhattan; Wm McKay, Manhattan; R. P. Duvall, Manhattan; Pardee Butler, Pardee; and L. F. Green, Baldwin City. Only the language restricting voting to "loyal" persons was passed in the election on November 5, 1867. Blacks and women were not given voting rights as a result of the 1867 election.


Albert R. Greene to Franklin G. Adams

Albert R. Greene to Franklin G. Adams
Creator: Greene, A.R.
Date: August 18, 1897
In this letter to Franklin G. Adams, Albert R. Greene explains that he recently met with Charles C. Haynes, with whom he discussed the waning days of the Overland Stage. Greene explains that Haynes was old but that his eye was as "keen as when he ran the gauntlet of hostile Indians and brought his coach into the home station bristling with arrows."


Albert Robinson Greene to Franklin G. Adams

Albert Robinson Greene to Franklin G. Adams
Creator: Greene, A.R.
Date: January 16, 1889
In this letter to Franklin G. Adams of the Kansas State Historical Society, Albert R. Greene briefly describes the major events of his life, including his early years, his service with the 9th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry during the Civil War, and his career after the war's end.


Children of Franklin G. and Harriet C. Adams

Children of Franklin G. and Harriet C. Adams
Date: Unknown
This is a family portrait of the children of Franklin G. and Harriet C. Adams. The girls, from left to right, are Margaret, Harriet E. and Zu (Abzuga). The boys are Paul, Samuel, and Henry. Franklin G. Adams was the first secretary (executive director) of the Kansas State Historical Society. Most of the children grew up in Topeka, Kansas.


Christmas in the 1870s

Christmas in the 1870s
Creator: Adams, Harriet Elizabeth, 1867-1938
Date: June 20, 1928
Harriet E. Adams wrote this reminiscence in 1928 about her childhood memories of Christmas. The story describes the family's preparations for Christmas, the activities of her older sister Zu Adams in creating an atmosphere appealing to her younger siblings, and their typical Christmas morning. Though the family lived in Topeka, Kansas at the time this reminiscence was written, they were living near Marysville in Marshall County when Harriet was seven. The story was written as part of the efforts of Lilla Day Monroe to collect reminiscences concerning the women's perspective in settling Kansas. Zu Adams was a long time employee of the Kansas State Historical Society and her father Franklin Adams was the first secretary (executive director) of the Society.


Complimentary admission ticket

Complimentary admission ticket
Creator: Western National Fair Association
Date: 1884
This complimentary admission ticket to the Western National Fair was issued to F. G. Adams "and lady." The 1884 fair was held from September 1-6 at Bismarck Grove, Lawrence, Kansas.


Fannie E. Cole to Zu Adams

Fannie E. Cole to Zu Adams
Creator: Cole, Fannie E.
Date: October 20, 1895
Fannie Cole wrote about slaves in Kansas Territory that she remembered from her childhood. Her family came to the territory in the spring of 1855 and settled in Shawnee County. The families with slaves that she mentioned were George L. Young and his mother, John Young, Louis Harris, and Perry Fleshman. This item is from information collected by Miss Zu Adams in 1895. She was researching the topic of slaves in Kansas and contacted a number of early Kansas settlers requesting information about slaves brought to Kansas Territory. While all of the information she collected was based on reminiscences, it still provides useful information that is difficult, if not impossible, to find elsewhere. Miss Adams and her father F. G. Adams were employees of the Kansas State Historical Society and the information received was donated to that institution.


Franklin G. Adams

Franklin G. Adams
Date: 1890s
This is a portrait of Franklin G. Adams who was the Secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas. Adams was a member of the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention. He served as an election judge for the second vote on the Lecompton Constitution. Earlier he was a Clerk of the U. S. District Court of Kansas. In 1875, he became the first secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society.


Franklin G. Adams

Franklin G. Adams
Creator: Leonard & Martin
Date: Between 1876 and 1883
This is a portrait of Franklin G. Adams who was the Secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas. Adams was a member of the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention. He served as an election judge for the second vote on the Lecompton Constitution. Earlier he was a Clerk of the U. S. District Court of Kansas. In 1875, he became the first secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society.


Franklin G. Adams

Franklin G. Adams
This is a portrait of Franklin G. Adams who was the Secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, Kansas. Adams was a member of the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention. He served as an election judge for the second vote on the Lecompton Constitution. Earlier he was a Clerk of the U. S. District Court of Kansas. In 1875, he became the first secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society.


George Walker to Franklin G. Adams

George Walker to Franklin G. Adams
Creator: Walker, George
Date: February 15, 1886
In this letter to Franklin G. Adams, the first secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society, George Walker of Burlington, Kansas, relates the story of how he found a Native American pipe while working as a cowboy. According to Walker, he found the pipe after his horse's hoof struck something "that gave out a ringing sound."


Grant W. Harrington and William E. Connelley correspondence

Grant W. Harrington and William E. Connelley correspondence
Creator: Connelley, William Elsey, 1855-1930
Date: November 24, 1929-November 27, 1929
This correspondence between Grant W. Harrington and William E. Connelley addresses the efforts to locate the village where Shawnee Prophet Ten-squa-ta-wa lived at while in Kansas.


Isaac Maris to F. G. Adams

Isaac Maris to F. G. Adams
Creator: Maris, Isaac
Date: July 22, 1895
Isaac Maris was responding to a request for information about slaves in Kansas Territory. He provides the names of several families who had slaves and describes the escape of one female slave and her child with indirect references to the underground railroad. This item is from information collected by Miss Zu Adams in 1895. She was researching the topic of slaves in Kansas and contacted a number of early Kansas settlers requesting information about slaves brought to Kansas Territory. While all of the information she collected was based on reminiscences, it still provides useful information that is difficult, if not impossible, to find elsewhere. Miss Adams and her father F. G. Adams were employees of the Kansas State Historical Society and the information received was donated to that institution.


J.K. Barnd to Franklin G. Adams

J.K. Barnd to Franklin G. Adams
Creator: Barnd, J.K.
Date: December 9, 1895
In this letter to Franklin G. Adams, J.K. Barnd, editor of the Ness County News of Ness, Kansas, discusses his interest in the route that explorer Zebulon Pike took when visiting the Pawnees in 1806. Barnd explains that previous accounts of the path followed by Pike were inaccurate, and that the village was most likely "nine or ten miles further up the river and on its west bank."


John Brown supporters

John Brown supporters
Date: 1880-1889
This formal studio portrait of eight John Brown supporters was taken some years after Brown's execution for treason for his part in the raid on Harpers Ferry, Virginia. On October 24, 1882, the Topeka Capital Journal ran an article titled "John Brown, A Reunion of his Surviving Associates-Recollections of the Battle of Blackjack - Bloody Scenes of Early Days in Kansas - Last Visit - The Preliminaries to Harper's Ferry - Several Very Interesting Narratives." This photograph may have been taken at this gathering. The portrait includes the notations "The group shown below were long supporters of the famous old champion of the colored race." and "John Brown Group." The men are identified at the bottom of the photograph: standing, from the left: Jacob Willets, John Armstrong, Col. Dan H. Horne; seated, from the left: Aug. H. Barnard, Col. John Ritchie, Charles W. Moffet, Edwin Bodwell, and F. G. Adams.


John C. McCoy to Franklin G. Adams

John C. McCoy to Franklin G. Adams
Creator: McCoy, John Calvin, 1811-1889
Date: February 09, 1885
In this item, from John C. McCoy to Franklin G. Adams of the Kansas State Historical Society, McCoy discusses his early experiences in Kansas. McCoy, who came to Kansas City in 1830 to perform missionary work with his father Isaac McCoy and mother Christiana McCoy, was an active figure throughout Kansas from 1830 until his death in 1889. In this letter to Adams, McCoy relates the details of people he came into contact with, including a number of Native Americans.


Leavenworth Constitutional Convention journal

Leavenworth Constitutional Convention journal
Date: April 2, 1858
When the convention considered Article 7, Education, near the end of the afternoon session on Friday, April 2, James Davis of Leavenworth moved to insert "white" before "child," but Sam Wood's motion to table passed 44 to 36. The yeas and nays were recorded.


Leavenworth Constitutional Convention journal

Leavenworth Constitutional Convention journal
Date: April 2, 1858
At the beginning of the afternoon session, on Friday, April 2, 1858, suffrage was briefly discussed, with Samuel N. Wood moving to strike "male" wherever it occurred in the instrument and "to insert after the word 'he' the words 'or she." The motion failed, but 20 delegates supported what arguably amounted to an equal rights amendment for women. The yeas and nays were recorded.


Marcus Lindsay Freeman, reminiscence of a former slave

Marcus Lindsay Freeman, reminiscence of a former slave
Creator: Freeman, Marcus Lindsay
Date: 1895
Mr. Freeman came to Kansas Territory as the slave of Thomas Bayne. Mr. Freeman described his childhood memories with his owner, who was about three months older and to whom he had been "given" as a baby. He provided information about his life and that of other family members and slaves during the Territorial era. This account was prepared by either F. G. or Zu Adams after an interview with Mr. Freeman. The penciled corrections were apparently made by Thomas Bayne. They contacted a number of early Kansas settlers requesting information about slaves brought to Kansas Territory. While all of the information collected was based on reminiscences, it still provides useful information that is difficult, if not impossible, to find elsewhere. Miss Adams and her father F. G. Adams were employees of the Kansas State Historical Society.


Minutes of the first, second, third and fourth annual meetings of the Kansas Equal Rights Suffrage Association

Minutes of the first, second, third and fourth annual meetings of the Kansas Equal Rights Suffrage Association
Creator: Kansas Equal Suffrage Association (1884-1913)
Date: January 6, 1887
This pamphlet contains the minutes of the first four annual meetings of the Kansas Equal Rights Suffrage Association. The meetings were held in 1884 in Topeka, in 1885 in Salina, in 1886 in Topeka, and in 1887 in Newton. The minutes for the 4th annual meeting contain a paper presented to the convention by F. G. Adams titled "The Women's Vote in Kansas." Adams, who was secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society at the time, compiled information about Kansas women voting the elections of April 1887. The minutes for each annual meeting include details of the meeting, the speakers, and who attended. The publication includes information on suffrage activities in all parts of the state and on women working suffrage. This was an important period for women's suffrage in Kansas because the voters in Kansas amended the constitution to permit women to vote in municipal elections in 1886.


Poll Book, Atchison, Lecompton Constitution

Poll Book, Atchison, Lecompton Constitution
Creator: Adams, F. G. (Franklin George), 1824-1899
Date: January 4, 1858
On January 4, 1858, by act of the free-state territorial legislature, the Kansas Territory voters were given a second chance to vote on the Lecompton Constitution. This poll book identifies the 319 individuals who voted against the Constitution as framed at Lecompton. The authenticity of the document was attested to by election judges, including F.G. Adams, and two clerks.


Reminiscence of John Sedgwick Freeland

Reminiscence of John Sedgwick Freeland
Creator: Freeland, John Sedgwick
Date: 1895
Mr. Freeland gave a detailed account of the slaves owned by Judge Rush Elmore and his wife. The reminiscence contained some stereotypical views and phrases concerning African Americans. This account was prepared by either F. G. or Zu Adams after an interview with Mr. Freeland. They contacted a number of early Kansas settlers requesting information about slaves brought to Kansas Territory. While all of the information collected was based on reminiscences, it still provides useful information that is difficult, if not impossible, to find elsewhere. Miss Adams and her father F. G. Adams were employees of the Kansas State Historical Society.


The women's vote in Kansas

The women's vote in Kansas
Creator: Adams, F. G. (Franklin George), 1824-1899
Date: 1887
Franklin Adams, secretary of the Kansas State Historical Society, wrote this pamphlet analyzing the votes cast during the April 1887 local election. This was the first election in which women in Kansas could vote in municipal elections, following the passage of a law by the Kansas Legislature in February 1887. These statistics were compiled from local newspaper reports of municipal elections and by members of the Women's Christian Temperance Union, who contacted local election officials. The pamphlet contains voting information from over 200 Kansas towns and provides useful statistics including the total population of each town, the total number of voters, and the number of male and female citizens who exercised their right to vote.


Thomas R. Bayne to Zu Adams

Thomas R. Bayne to Zu Adams
Creator: Bayne, Thomas R.
Date: September 11, 1895
Mr. Bayne wrote from Williamstown, Kansas, describing slaves that he had owned. He also listed a number of other families who owned slaves in Kansas during the territorial period in southern Jefferson and northern Douglas counties. He offered a southerners' perspective on owning slaves. This item is from information collected by F. G. Adams and Miss Zu (Zoe) Adams in 1895. They contacted a number of early Kansas settlers requesting information about slaves brought to Kansas Territory. While all of the information collected was based on reminiscences, it still provides useful information that is difficult, if not impossible, to find elsewhere. Miss Adams and her father F. G. Adams were employees of the Kansas State Historical Society.


William Leamer to F. G. Adams

William Leamer to F. G. Adams
Creator: Leamer, William
Date: July 13, 1895
Writing from Lecompton, William Leamer described several families who had slaves when he arrived in Kansas Territory in 1856. The information is very brief. This item is from information collected by Miss Zu Adams in 1895. She was researching the topic of slaves in Kansas and contacted a number of early Kansas settlers requesting information about slaves brought to Kansas Territory. While all of the information she collected was based on reminiscences, it still provides useful information that is difficult, if not impossible, to find elsewhere. Miss Adams and her father F. G. Adams were employees of the Kansas State Historical Society and the information received was donated to that institution.


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