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Edmund Burke Whitman? to Franklin B. Sanborn

Edmund Burke Whitman? to Franklin B. Sanborn
Creator: Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883
Date: May 10, 1857
E. B. Whitman (letter not signed, but author's identity is pretty clear), an agent in Lawrence for the National Kansas Committee, wrote Franklin Sanborn in Massachusetts regarding his disappointment with the lack of support being given by "our professed friends" in the East. To their discredit, according to Whitman, Massachusetts "supporters" had refused to provide assistance which was desperately needed for the Kansas settlers who had just endured a very "severe winter." He believed false information was being circulated for political purposes by individuals within the Free State movement: "Kansas, bleeding Kansas, is of value to them only so far as it subserves their selfish ends."


Francis Barrow to Robert Simerwell

Francis Barrow to Robert Simerwell
Creator: Barrow, Francis
Date: May 27, 1828
In this letter to Robert Simerwell, Francis Barrow writes about life in and around Castleton, Vermont. Barrow tells Simerwell that they like the "yankees" but that many of the people they visit "ask to many question." In concluding, Barrow asks Simerwell about the general situation at Carey, and requests that Simerwell "I want you should tell me about the Indian when you write to me."


Good Roads Days

Good Roads Days
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: 1915
This file includes general correspondence relating to Good Road Days. The correspondence is between Governor Capper's office and the Legislative Reference Bureau in Montpelier, Vermont, discussing if there was a legislation or proclamation from the governor's office to celebrate Good Roads. This is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.


Governor Edward W. Hoch to Governor Fletcher D. Procter

Governor Edward W. Hoch to Governor Fletcher D. Procter
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1905-1909: Hoch)
Date: October 31, 1906
Kansas Governor Edward W. Hoch of Topeka responds to a request by Vermont Governor Fletcher D. Procter of Montpelier for information on Kansas laws concerning capital punishment. Hoch states that Kansas laws allow for the death penalty but requires an order from the Governor. Hoch states his opposition to capital punishment and his belief that no Kansas Governor has ever issued an execution order [under this law], and that no Governor ever will. While executions by state authority were legal in Kansas from 1861-1907, the State Legislature imposed tighter regulations on death sentences with Senate Bill 18 (1872). The act provided the time of execution to be ordered by the Governor. Kansas Governors between 1872-1907 refused to issue execution orders, as required by law, effectively banning state authorized executions during that period. See Governor Procter to Governor Hoch, October 22, 1906.


Governor Fletcher D. Procter to Governor Edward W. Hoch

Governor Fletcher D. Procter to Governor Edward W. Hoch
Creator: Procter, Fletcher D.
Date: October 22, 1906
Vermont Governor Fletcher D. Procter of Montpelier writes Kansas Governor Edward W. Hoch of Topeka concerning capital punishment. Procter wants to know if Kansas laws have effectively abolished capital punishment, and if so, what effect this has had on crime in the state. While executions by state authority were legal in Kansas from 1861-1907, the Legislature imposed tighter regulations on death sentences with Senate Bill 18 (1872). The act provided the time of execution to be ordered by the governor. Kansas governors between 1872-1907 refused to issue execution orders, as required by law, effectively banning state authorized executions during that period. See Governor Hoch to Governor Procter, October 31, 1906.


Henry Blood

Henry Blood
Date: Between 1870 and 1880
Portrait of Henry Blood, the director and vice-president of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railway between 1870 and 1872.


Jacob Collamer to William Hutchinson

Jacob Collamer to William Hutchinson
Creator: Collamer, Jacob, 1791-1865
Date: December 17, 1857
Jacob Collamer, a U.S. senator from Vermont, cautions William Hutchinson against an attempt to establish a Kansas state government under the Topeka Constitution without the consent of Congress.


Jacob Collamer to William Hutchinson

Jacob Collamer to William Hutchinson
Creator: Collamer, Jacob, 1791-1865
Date: March 23, 1858
Jacob Collamer, a U. S. senator from Vermont, writes from Washington, D. C., in response to a request from William Hutchinson for assistance in Hutchinson's plan to speculate in land on the Delaware Indian reservation in Kansas Territory. Collamer informs Hutchinson that it does not appear that the anticipated treaty with the Delaware would be negotiated during the current session of Congress.


Katherine Amelia Whitney Whiting

Katherine Amelia Whitney Whiting
Creator: Leonard, J. H.
Date: Between 1890 and 1900
This cabinet card shows Katherine Amelia Whitney Whiting (1838-1907). Whiting a native of Waterbury, Vermont received her formal education at the Fairfax and Barrer Academies. She taught school in the Vermont area before marring Albe Burge Whiting on November 15, 1858. Within a year of their marriage the couple were moving to the Kansas territory. In August of 1859, the Whiting's settled near Fort Riley, and founded the town of Milford. For nearly twenty years the couple operated a number of business in the Milford area before moving, in 1877, to Topeka, Kansas. In the capitol city, Mr. Whiting engaged in a number of business ventures which gave him and his wife the means to give back to the community. As philanthropists the Whitings purchased in 1907 160 acres of land that established the Mt. Hope Cemetery in Topeka, as 1,000 year endowments for Washburn College, the Topeka Y.W.C.A. and the Topeka Y.M.C.A. Katherine Whitney Whiting died August 11, 1908 at her Topeka home at the age of 69. Burial was at Mt. Hope Cemetery.


Leigh R. Webber to Charles Brown

Leigh R. Webber to Charles Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: March 23, 1862
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Fort Scott, Kansas, addressed to Charles Brown. Webber expresses frustration at his bad health, the poor weather, and fort life. He wished for the troops to move to territory where they could engage in battle and gain "military glory." Webber describes the unruly behavior of the troops, including violence and drunkenness.


Leigh R. Webber to John Stillman Brown

Leigh R. Webber to John Stillman Brown
Creator: Webber, L. R.
Date: December 23, 1864
A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Troy, Vermont, addressed to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber discusses Kansas politics, particularly the debate between supporters and critics of Senator James H. Lane. He also remarks on the "late successes of the Union armies," and worries that political tensions with Great Britain may escalate into another war.


John N. Gardner to Thaddeus Hyatt

John N. Gardner to Thaddeus Hyatt
Creator: Gardner, John N.
Date: January 9, 1860
This letter, written from Buffalo by John N. Gardner, is addressed to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. Mr. Gardner relates the tale of Mrs. H.G. Hyzen of Waitsfield, Vermont, an ardent supporter of John Brown who claimed to have a clairvoyant vision of him in his prison cell. The entire letter is a passionate piece of correspondence, speaking frequently of liberty and the "Total Annihilation of that Scourge of Humanity, Human Slavery." The letter also mentions other abolitionists--Henry C. Wright and Mrs. Child--who wrote letters to John Brown. Though dated 1859, the letter must have been written in January 1860 after Brown's execution on December 2, 1859.


O. E. Learnard to friends

O. E. Learnard to friends
Creator: Learnard, Oscar E.
Date: June 6, 1856
From an embattled Lawrence, Learnard again wrote of near daily "occurrences of exciting interest," including skirmishes between the two "antagonistic parties" and actions of federal troops to "quell disturbances." The problem was with Missourians who had crossed over the border, not "actual settlers." Learnard claimed to be ready to do battle with them over the issue of "slavery or liberty in this country," and predicted that if things continued in this same direction, the entire country would soon be "embroiled in civil war."


Oscar E. Learnard

Oscar E. Learnard
Creator: Mettner Studios of Lawrence
Oscar E. Learnard came to Kansas from Vermont in the fall of 1855. He first settled in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, but later was one of the founders of Burlington in Coffey County, Kansas Territory in the spring of 1857. He served on the Territorial Council. He was president of the May 18, 1859, convention at Osawatimie where the Republican Party was organized. This photograph was taken later in his life by Mettner's Studio, Lawrence, Kansas.


Oscar E. Learnard to friends

Oscar E. Learnard to friends
Creator: Learnard, Oscar E.
Date: September 9, 1856
From Lawrence, Kansas Territory, Oscar Learnard wrote briefly to some Vermont friends of his recent "military" experience as "Lieutenant Colonel of the 4th regiment (cavalry) of Kansas Volunteers." At the time, Learnard said "the whole Territory presents a scene of wide spread desolation," but he also claimed Kansas was a beautiful place full of opportunity for agriculturalists and real estate investors. At present, however, one should only come if well armed and via "the new road" [Lane Trail].


Oscar E. Learnard to his parents and sister

Oscar E. Learnard to his parents and sister
Creator: Learnard, Oscar E.
Date: April 6, 1856
In this, his first extant letter from Kansas Territory, Oscar Learnard wrote his parents and sister in Vermont that Lawrence was now his "distant and strangely romantic retreat." This letter recorded Learnard's early impressions of "unfortunate abused Kansas." The situation was bad, but the reality of "Kansas affairs" was being distorted in the Eastern press. Learnard made reference to the bogus laws, the Free State movement, and the anticipated congressional investigation.


Oscar E. Learnard to S.T. Learnard

Oscar E. Learnard to S.T. Learnard
Creator: Learnard, Oscar E.
Date: July 23, 1856
Oscar Learnard wrote his father, S.T. Learnard, that he was disappointed in the attitude of people in Vermont and throughout the North who continued to support the Pierce administration. If they did so because they were Democrats, they should learn from Andrew H. Reeder, J. H. Lane, William Y. Roberts, and others who had seen the light. Learnard admitted "a few cases" of free state retaliation "upon their oppressors," and then gave some "facts" about the "Patawotamie" incident, while not mentioning John Brown by name. Learnard believed that the reports about mangled bodies were untrue.


Receipt, B. B. Newton to Thomas W. Higginson

Receipt, B. B. Newton to Thomas W. Higginson
Creator: Newton, B.B
Date: August 26, 1856
B. B. Newton, an agent with the Vermont State Kansas Committee, acknowledges receipt of twenty rifles from Reverend Thomas W. Higginson. Newont plans to transport these twenty rifles to the Vermont Colony in Kansas Territory. Higginson was an agent for the Massachusetts Kansas Aid Committee.


Samuel Whitcomb to G. Smith

Samuel Whitcomb to G. Smith
Creator: Whitcomb, Samuel
Date: August 30, 1856
This letter, written in Springfield by Samuel Whitcomb, is addressed to the Honorable G. Smith of Peterborg, New York. It is a passionate piece of correspondence that discusses slavery and liberty, demonstrating the conviction of this free-soil advocate. Whitcomb also expressed his frustration that the federal government was not more supportive of the free state cause in Kansas Territory, as well as his fear that the war was destined to spread out from Kansas.


State Flags

State Flags
Creator: Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)
Date: February 1915
This file includes correspondence and postcards; correspondence from Secretary of States describe the colors, fabric, dimensions, and symbolism of their state flag. The postcard, if provided, shows the graphical design of each state flag. Correspondence is arranged alphabetically by state. This file is part of a bigger collection of Governor Arthur Capper correspondence.


S. T. Learnard to Oscar E. Learnard, his son

S. T. Learnard to Oscar E. Learnard, his son
Creator: Learnard, S. T.
Date: January 14, 1858
Writing from Bakersfield, Vermont, to his son Oscar Learnard, S. T. Learnard claimed he was still planning to travel to Kansas Territory, and he asked about his son's affairs in Burlington. Learnard also focused on political attitudes in the East and mentioned Stephen Douglas' "speech on Kansas affairs" (Lecompton Constitution), which had caused "our Bogus democrats" to draw in "their horns." Many Democrats, he insisted, were still "ready to do any dirty work the slave power wish them to do."


S.T. Learnard to Oscar Learnard

S.T. Learnard to Oscar Learnard
Creator: Learnard, S. T.
Date: November 6, 1860
S.T. Learnard, a farmer and occasional state legislator from Bakersfield, Vermont, wrote his "Kansas" son frequently and complained that replies from Kansas were far too scarce. In this letter, S.T. Learnard commented on suffering in the territory, presumably from drought, and his hope that the national election would eliminate "her troubles from one source." He complimented the "brave men and women" of Kansas for their "suffering and endurance in the Cause of Liberty," and expressed confidence that Abraham Lincoln, who did well in Bakersfield, would win New York.


Thomas Webb to J. S. Emery

Thomas Webb to J. S. Emery
Creator: Webb, Thomas H. (Thomas Hopkins), 1801-1866
Date: April 4, 1856
Thomas Webb of Boston, Massachusetts, writes J. S. Emery in Brandon, Vermont, to tell him of various places in Maine and New Hampshire that would like someone from Kansas to speak to them. Webb informs Emery that the group in New Hampshire is interested in securing recruits to go to Kansas, but that Emery's principal purpose is to raise money for the Relief Fund. He writes Emery that the sponsoring group should cover his expenses, that they should take contributions at any public meeting and that they should establish a committee for soliciting funds locally. Webb also describes an incident where Missourians seized a box they thought contained weapons, but it housed a rosewood piano. Webb also mentions that Charles Robinson was in Washington, D. C.


T. W. Higginson to William Hutchinson

T. W. Higginson to William Hutchinson
Creator: Higginson, Thomas Wentworth
Date: October 27, 1856
This letter and accompanying list of forthcoming relief supplies (shirts, dresses, over coats, etc.) is directed to William Hutchinson, "Treasurer Kanzas Committee," by Thomas Wentworth Higginson of Brattleboro, Vermont. Three boxes of clothing had been sent, and Higginson reminds Hutchinson that it was "very important that in this case & in all cases, prompt acknowledgement should be made of the receipt of everything contributed to Kanzas." People need to know that their contributions were getting through and that they were appreciated.


Vermont Colony in Kansas report

Vermont Colony in Kansas report
Creator: Newton, B.B
Date: September 24, 1856
This report, written by B. B. Newton to the Vermont State Kansas Committee, described the efforts made by the Pioneer Party to settle in Kansas Territory.


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