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Objects and Artifacts - Archeological Artifacts - Artifact Type - Nutting Stone

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Mano and Nutting Stone from 14SA409

Mano and Nutting Stone from 14SA409
Date: 1 CE-1500 CE
This mano and nutting stone was recovered from the surface of a Saline County camp site and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2017. The site was occupied during the Upper Republican and Smoky Hill phases during the Early and Middle Ceramic periods. One side of this ground stone tool served as the topmost millstone for grinding foods by hand on a grinding stone. The other side of the tool served as a nutting stone, used for securing a nut while it was being cracked open. Groundstone tools like this one are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state.


Mano and Nutting Stone from the Curry Site, 14GR301

Mano and Nutting Stone from the Curry Site, 14GR301
Date: 1200-1400 CE
This combination mano and nutting stone, was recovered from the Curry site and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1984. One side of this ground stone tool served as the topmost millstone for grinding foods by hand on a grinding stone. The other side of the tool served as a nutting stone, used for securing a nut while it was being cracked open. Groundstone tools like this one are made by pecking a hard stone into a rough shape and then grinding and polishing it into its final state. The Curry site is a multicomponent (multiple occupations) village site in Greenwood County.


Nutting Stone from Doniphan County

Nutting Stone from Doniphan County
Date: Unknown
This nutting stone was recovered from Doniphan County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2008. Sometimes named anvil stones, cupstones, or pitted stones, artifacts such as this one are thought to hold a nut in place while the nutshell is cracked.


Nutting Stone from the Fanning Site, 14DP1

Nutting Stone from the Fanning Site, 14DP1
Date: 1500-1700
This nutting stone was recovered from the Fanning site in Doniphan County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1981. Sometimes named anvil stones, cupstones, or pitted stones, artifacts such as this one are thought to hold a nut in place while the nutshell is cracked. However, as the dark red stain on the stones surface shows, this nutting stone was also used to crush a pigment such as hematite, a relatively soft and fine-grained mineral form of iron oxide. The Fanning site was a Late Ceramic to early Contact Period Kansa village.


Nutting Stone from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301

Nutting Stone from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301
Date: 1-1800 CE
This fragment of sandstone has indentations on both ends that suggest it was used as a nutting stone. Sometimes named anvil stones, cupstones, or pitted stones, artifacts such as this one are thought to hold a nut in place while the nutshell is cracked. It was collected from the Wullschleger site in Marshall County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1961. The site was occupied periodically throughout the Early, Middle and Late Ceramic periods.


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