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Objects and Artifacts - Archeological Artifacts - Artifact Type - Knife - Munkers Creek

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Munkers Creek Knife from the Foltz Site, 14WB386

Munkers Creek Knife from the Foltz Site, 14WB386
Date: 4250-2850 BCE
This Munkers Creek-like knife was collected from the Foltz site, an archeological site in Wabaunsee County with multiple occupations from the Archaic to the Middle Ceramic periods. The knife was donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2018. Munkers Creek knives are interesting in that many have a clearly visible gloss along one side. This gloss is silica from grass stems. People may have used these knives to cut grass to thatch houses or for other purposes.


Munkers Creek Knives from the Elliott Site, 14GE303

Munkers Creek Knives from the Elliott Site, 14GE303
Date: 4250-2850 BCE
These six Munkers Creek knives were collected from an archeological site in Geary County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1925. Munkers Creek knives are interesting in that many have a clearly visible gloss along one side from silica from grass stems. These knives may have used to cut grass to thatch houses or for other purposes. These are made of local Florence chert from the Flint Hills region. The Munkers Creek phase describes a stone tool technology restricted primarily to the Flint Hills. During this time most of North America was in a prolonged drought so severe that some archeologists thought people left the Plains. Munkers Creek artifacts show that people stayed, but they had to adapt by using many different types of animals and plants for food in a less productive environment.


Munkers Creek Knives from the William Young Site, 14MO304

Munkers Creek Knives from the William Young Site, 14MO304
Date: 4250-2850 BCE
The Munkers Creek phase describes a stone tool technology restricted primarily to the Flint Hills. During this time most of North America was in a prolonged drought so severe that Archeologists thought people left the Plains. Munkers Creek artifacts show that people stayed, but they may have chosen their habitats carefully. Munkers Creek knives, like these from the William Young site in Morris County, are interesting in that many have a clearly visible gloss along one side. This gloss is silica from grass stems. People may have used these knives to cut grass to thatch houses of for other purposes.


Munkers Creek Knives, Gouges and Bone Awl from the William Young Site, 14MO304

Munkers Creek Knives, Gouges and Bone Awl from the William Young Site, 14MO304
Date: 4250-2850 BCE
The Munkers Creek phase describes a stone tool technology restricted primarily to the Flint Hills. During this time most of North America was in a prolonged drought so severe that Archeologists thought people left the Plains. Munkers Creek artifacts show that people stayed, but they may have chosen their habitats carefully. Munkers Creek knives, like these from the William Young site (14MO304) in Morris County, are interesting in that many have a clearly visible gloss along one side that comes from grass stems. They may have been used to cut grass to thatch houses or for other purposes. Gouges were likely used to modify wood and bone. Bone awls were used to make holes in soft material or perhaps in basket manufacturing.


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