Kansas MemoryKansas Memory

Kansas Historical SocietyKansas Historical Society

-

Log In

Username:

Password:

After login, go to:

Register
Forgot Username?
Forgot Password?

Browse Users
Contact us

-

Martha Farnsworth

-

Podcast Archive

Governor Mike Hayden Interview
Details
Listen Now
Subscribe - iTunesSubscribe - RSS

More podcasts

-

Popular Item

Winter 1977, Volume 43, Number 4

-

Random Item

Playing table tennis Playing table tennis

-

Site Statistics

Total images: 735,961
Bookbag items: 41,554
Registered users: 12,530

-

About

Kansas Memory has been created by the Kansas State Historical Society to share its historical collections via the Internet. Read more.

-

Syndication

Matching items: 26

Category Filters

Objects and Artifacts - Archeological Artifacts - Material/Stone Type - Obsidian

Search within these results


       

Search Tips

Start Over | RSS Feed RSS Feed

View: Image Only | Title Only | Detailed
Sort by: TitleSort by Title, Ascending | Date | Creator | Newest

Showing 1 - 25 of 26 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)
Next Page >


Arrow Points from 14PT420

Arrow Points from 14PT420
Date: 1300-1500 CE
Shown are two arrow points recovered y Kansas Historical Society archeologists at a Middle Ceramic period Pratt complex village in Pratt County. The complete side-notched arrow point is made of an unknown chert. The corner-notched obsidian fragment was sent for X-ray-florescence (XRF) testing, a chemical analysis that indicates the original source of the obsidian. The flake was found to be from a lava flow in the Jemez Mountains near Taos, New Mexico. This type of analysis helps archeologists learn about ancient trade patterns, suggesting either trade with people further southwest or travel by Pratt complex people to the Jemez Mountains.


Modified Obisidian Flake from the Woods Site, 14CY30

Modified Obisidian Flake from the Woods Site, 14CY30
Date: 1000-1500 CE
This modified flake of obsidian was recovered from a Clay County Middle Ceramic period village with at least two house. There is no natural source of obsidian in Clay County, so it was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. Archeologists are interested in what the artifacts, even the smallest of artifacts, can tell about how people used resources, moved across their landscapes and interacted with other groups.


Obsidian Arrow Point from the Larcom-Haggard Site, 14CO1

Obsidian Arrow Point from the Larcom-Haggard Site, 14CO1
Date: 1400-1725 CE
This obsidian arrow point was recovered at the Larcom-Haggard site, a Lower Walnut focus Great Bend aspect site in Cowley County. There is no natural source of obsidian in Kansas, so it was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. The village was rediscovered next to an old river meander with a modern gravel quarry greatly impacting the site. The people that lived in the village are ancestral to the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes. Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew excavated there in 1996.


Obsidian Arrow Points from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1

Obsidian Arrow Points from El Cuartelejo, 14SC1
Date: 1650-1750 CE
Shown are two obsidian arrow points that were recovered from the El Cuartelejo site in Scott County. These arrow points were recovered during the 1976 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. There is no natural source of obsidian in Scott County, so it was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. El Cuartelejo, also called the Scott County Pueblo, has been excavated and studied by many archeologists since 1898. The site, unique in Kansas, is the location of a seven room pueblo occupied by refugees from the Taos and Picuris pueblos in New Mexico in addition to Dismal River aspect groups (Apache).


Obsidian Arrow Points from Morris County

Obsidian Arrow Points from Morris County
Date: 1-1000 CE
These two obsidian arrow points were found along the Santa Fe trail near Wilsey, in Morris County. Both arrow points are corner notched. The source for obsidian is not found locally in Morris County, but most likely was traded in from a mountainous area that had seen volcanic activity long ago (obsidian is volcanic glass). Archeologists are interested in what the artifacts, even the smallest of artifacts, can tell about how people used resources, moved across their landscapes and interacted with other groups.


Obsidian Flake from the Bozone Blowout #1 Site, 14SV403

Obsidian Flake from the Bozone Blowout #1 Site, 14SV403
Date: 1000-1800 CE
Sometimes the smallest artifact recovered from a site can have a good potential for helping Archeologists understand the activities at the site. Take, for example, this small obsidian fragment, broken off of either a biface or an arrow point. There is no natural source of obsidian in Stevens County, so it was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. Archeologists are interested in what the artifacts, even the smallest of artifacts, can tell about how people used resources, moved across their landscapes and interacted with other groups.


Obsidian Flakes from 14PT420

Obsidian Flakes from 14PT420
Date: 1300-1500 CE
Shown are two obsidian (volcanic glass) flakes excavated by Kansas Historical Society archeologists at a Middle Ceramic period Pratt complex village in Pratt County. The flakes were analyzed using X-ray florescence, a chemical analysis that indicates the original source of the obsidian. The flakes were found to be from two different lava flows on the same mountain peak in the Jemez Mountains near Taos, New Mexico. This type of analysis helps archeologists learn about ancient trade patterns, suggesting either trade with people further south or travel by Pratt complex people to the Texas panhandle.


Obsidian Flakes from the Grassroots Site, 14SN307

Obsidian Flakes from the Grassroots Site, 14SN307
Date: 1-1000 CE
These two obsidian flakes were recovered from the Grassroots site, an Early Ceramic period site in Sherman County. In 2005, they analyzed using x-ray florescence (XRF) testing, an elemental analysis that matches the composition of the artifact to the composition of known sources. One piece was determined to be Valles Rhyolite from the Cerro del Medio member and the other to be Cerro Toledo Rhyolite from the Obsidian Ridge member, both places found in the Jemez Mountains in New Mexico. Thus XRF studies help archeologists to learn about ancient trade patterns.


Obsidian Fresno Arrow Point from the Thompson Gardens Site, 14CO1509

Obsidian Fresno Arrow Point from the Thompson Gardens Site, 14CO1509
Date: 1400-1725 CE
This obsidian Fresno arrow point was recovered from the Thompson Gardens site in Cowley County. Archeologists identify Fresno arrow points as being triangular and unnotched. Though small and thin, it would have been extremely effective on the hunt. There is no natural source of obsidian in Cowley County, so it was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. Archeologists are interested in what the artifacts, even the smallest of artifacts, can tell about how people used resources, moved across their landscapes and interacted with other groups. The site was a large Great Bend aspect village. The people that inhabited Great Bend aspect sites are ancestral to the Wichita and affiliated tribes. Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew excavated at the site in 1995.


Obsidian from the Ade Site, 14MP311

Obsidian from the Ade Site, 14MP311
Date: 1000-1800 CE
These three pieces of obsidian were recovered from the Ade site in McPherson County and, in 2004, were donated to the Kansas Historical Society. The Ade site was a multicomponent site with occupations in the Middle and Late Ceramic periods. There is no natural source of obsidian in McPherson County, so it was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. These small pieces of obsidian have not yet been sent for xray-florescence (XRF) testing, a chemical and elemental analysis that determines where material came from originally. Archeologists are interested in what the artifacts, even the smallest of artifacts, can tell about how people used resources, moved across their landscapes and interacted with other groups.


Obsidian from the Country Club Site, 14CO3

Obsidian from the Country Club Site, 14CO3
Date: 1400-1725 CE
These two fragments of obsidian were excavated from a Great Bend aspect village site in Cowley County during Phase IV archeological investigations in 1995. In 2005, they, along with other obsidian from the site, were analyzed using x-ray florescence (XRF) testing, an elemental analysis that matches the composition of the artifact to the composition of known sources. It was determined the obsidian from the site was Valles Rhyolite from the Cerro del Medio member and Cerro Toledo Rhyolite from the Obsidian Ridge member, both places found in the Jemez Mountains in New Mexico. Thus XRF studies help archeologists to learn about ancient trade patterns. The Country Club site had been much impacted by a water line, golf greens, roads, and highways. Excavations had been occurring at the site since 1916.


Obsidian from the Havelock Site, 14CO332

Obsidian from the Havelock Site, 14CO332
Date: 1400-1700 CE
These obsidian flakes were recovered during excavations at the Havelock archeological site in Cowley County by Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew in 1995. There is no natural source of obsidian in Cowley County, so the material was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. The flake on the left was tested and it was determined to be Valle Grande obsidian from New Mexico. Archeologists are interested in what the artifacts, even the smallest of artifacts, can tell about how people used resources, moved across their landscapes and interacted with other groups. The site, with the remains of grass thatched houses and a variety of distinctive stone, ceramic, and bone tools, are part of a set of characteristics that archeologists call the Great Bend aspect. The people that used these characteristics lived between 1400-1700 CE in central and south-central Kansas and are ancestral to the Wichita Indians.


Obsidian from the Kermit Hayes Site, 14RC306

Obsidian from the Kermit Hayes Site, 14RC306
Date: 1450-1700
These obsidian flakes were recovered from an archeological site in Rice County during the 1981 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. In 2005, they were analyzed using X-ray florescence (XRF), an elemental analysis that matches the composition of the artifact to the composition of known sources. Two pieces were determined to be Valles Rhyolite from the Cerro del Medio member and the other to be Cerro Toledo Rhyolite from the Obsidian Ridge member, both places found in the Jemez Mountains in New Mexico. Thus XRF studies help archeologists to learn about ancient trade patterns. The site was a small Great Bend aspect, Little River focus grass-covered pit house that included an entryway, storage pits, post molds and a hearth. The people that inhabited Great Bend aspect sites are ancestral to the Wichita and Affiliated Tribes.


Obsidian from the Killdeer Site, 14CO501

Obsidian from the Killdeer Site, 14CO501
Date: 1500-1725 CE
These obsidian flakes were recovered from the Killdeer site in Cowley County. Some of the obsidian at the Killdeer site was analyzed using x-ray florescence (XRF), an elemental analysis that matches the composition of the artifact to the composition of known sources. Those flakes were determined to be Valle Grande and Cerro Toledo obsidian from New Mexico. The site is a Lower Walnut focus Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) site in Cowley County with numerous pits, basins and post molds. The Killdeer site was excavated during the Kansas Archeology Training Program field school in 1994 and later with Kansas Historical Society archeologists and crew members.


Obsidian from the Lewis Site, 14PA307

Obsidian from the Lewis Site, 14PA307
Date: 1000-1700 CE
These seven obsidian flakes were excavated in 1966 at the Lewis site in Pawnee County by Kansas Historical Society archeologists. In 2005, they were analyzed using x-ray florescence (XRF) testing, an elemental analysis that matches the composition of the artifact to the composition of known sources. The obsidian at the Lewis site was determined to be from Valles Rhyolite from the Cerro del Medio member and the Cerro Toledo Rhyolite from the Obsidian Ridge member, both places found in the Jemez Mountains in New Mexico. Thus XRF studies help archeologists to learn about ancient trade patterns. The Lewis site has Pratt Complex (Middle Ceramic period), Smoky Hill aspect (Middle Ceramic period), and Great Bend aspect (Late Ceramic period) occupations.


Obsidian from the Majors Site, 14RC2

Obsidian from the Majors Site, 14RC2
Date: 1500-1700 CE
These three obsidian artifacts, one modified flake and two flakes, were recovered from the Majors site in Rice County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1982. There is no natural source of obsidian in Rice County, so it was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. The Majors site was a Great Bend aspect, Little River focus (ancestral Wichita) site that was occupied during the late 17th century based on southwestern pottery styles. Archeologists are interested in what the artifacts, even the smallest of artifacts, can tell about how people used resources, moved across their landscapes and interacted with other groups.


Obsidian from the Paint Creek Site, 14MP1

Obsidian from the Paint Creek Site, 14MP1
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These two pieces of obsidian, along with five others from the Paint Creek site in McPherson County, were analyzed using x-ray florescence (XRF) testing, an elemental analysis that matches the composition of the artifact to the composition of known sources. The pieces were found to be from the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico, Sierra de Pachuca, Mexico, and an unidentified source. Thus XRF studies help archeologists to learn about ancient trade patterns. The Paint Creek site is what archeologists call part of the Little River Focus of the Great Bend Aspect, whose people practiced fishing, hunting, gathering, and agriculture.


Obsidian from the Rolland Boone Site, 14GO402

Obsidian from the Rolland Boone Site, 14GO402
Date: 3000 BCE-1500 CE
These obsidian flakes were recovered from an archeological site in Gove County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1980 and 1986. There is no natural source of obsidian in Gove County, so they were likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. Archeologists are interested in what even the smallest of artifacts can tell us about how people used resources, moved across their landscapes and interacted with other groups. The site, situated on the bank of a creek, was occupied periodically for over 4,000 years.


Obsidian from the Thompson Site, 14RC9

Obsidian from the Thompson Site, 14RC9
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These two obsidian artifacts were excavated at the Thompson site in Rice County during the 1986 Kansas Archeological Training Program field school. There is no natural source of obsidian in Rice County, so it was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. The small artifact may be an arrow point, while the other may be either a knife tip or a biface. The site, listed in the National Register of Historic Places, was a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village occupied during the Late Ceramic Period. Archeologists are interested in what the artifacts, even the smallest of artifacts, can tell about how people used resources, moved across their landscapes and interacted with other groups.


Obsidian from the Tobias Site, 14RC8

Obsidian from the Tobias Site, 14RC8
Date: 1400-1700 CE
These obsidian pieces were excavated during the 1977 and 1978 Kansas Archeology Training Program field schools at the Tobias site in Rice County. There is no natural source of obsidian in Rice County. One piece (top) was determined to be from the Malad, Idaho, region and the others to be from Obsidian Cliff in Wyoming. Archeologists are interested in what even the smallest of artifacts can tell about how people used resources, moved across their landscapes, and interacted with other groups. The Tobias site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita and Affiliated Tribes) village that had dense artifact deposits, house remains, and numerous deep trash-filled storage pits. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Obsidian from the Tobias Site, 14RC8

Obsidian from the Tobias Site, 14RC8
Date: 1400-1700 CE
These three obsidian artifacts were recovered from excavations during the 1977 and 1978 Kansas Archeology Training Program field schools at the Tobias site in Rice County. Shown are two bifaces and a triangular Fresno arrow point. Other obsidian recovered from the site was sourced to New Mexico by using xray-florescence (XRF) testing, a chemical and elemental analysis that determines where obsidian originates. The Tobias site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village that had dense artifact deposits, house remains, and numerous deep trash-filled storage pits. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Obsidian from the Tobias Site, 14RC8

Obsidian from the Tobias Site, 14RC8
Date: 1400-1700 CE
These obsidian pieces were excavated during the 2019 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at the Tobias site in Rice County. There is no natural source of obsidian in Rice County, so the obsidian was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. Archeologists are interested in what even the smallest of artifacts can tell about how people used resources, moved across their landscapes, and interacted with other groups. The Tobias site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village that had dense artifact deposits, house remains, and numerous deep trash-filled storage pits. It is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Obsidian from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301

Obsidian from the Wullschleger Site, 14MH301
Date: 1-1800 CE
This modified flake was collected from the Wullschleger site in Marshall County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 1961. The site was occupied periodically throughout the Early, Middle and Late Ceramic periods. There is no natural source of obsidian in Marshall County, so it was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. Archeologists are interested in what even the smallest of artifacts can tell about how people used resources, moved across their landscapes and interacted with other groups.


Obsidian Paleoindian Projectile Point from Morris County

Obsidian Paleoindian Projectile Point from Morris County
Date: 11000-7000 BCE
This nearly complete Paleoindian point was found on the east side of the former Kaw Reservation in Morris County. There is no natural source of obsidian in Morris County, so it was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. The point would have functioned as a spear tip. The tip and one ear are missing. The artifact is a good example of oblique parallel flaking. Paleoindian people traveled in small groups, hunting large game, including now extinct bison. Stone tools help reveal how these people lived and traveled, and how they differed from other groups.


Side-Notched Arrow Points from the Tobias Site, 14RC8

Side-Notched Arrow Points from the Tobias Site, 14RC8
Date: 1400-1700 CE
These four side-notched arrow points were recovered from excavations at the 1977 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at the Tobias site in Rice County. The notches on the arrow points aided in hafting the point to the arrow shaft. From left to right the points are made of obsidian, and unknown chert type, and two heat-treated Permian cherts. There is no natural source of obsidian in Rice County, so it was likely traded from a volcanic source such as the Yellowstone region of Wyoming or Taos, New Mexico. Heat-treating chert helps to improve the knapping qualities of that chert. The Tobias site is a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village that had dense artifact deposits, house remains, and numerous deep trash-filled storage pits. The site is listed in the National Register of Historic Places.


Showing 1 - 25
Next Page >

Copyright © 2007-2022 - Kansas Historical Society - Contact Us
This website was developed in part with funding provided by the Information Network of Kansas.