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Objects and Artifacts - Archeological Artifacts - Artifact Type - Rasp

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Showing 1 - 14 of 14 (results per page: 10 | 25 | 50)


Bison Bone Rasp from the Crandall Site, 14RC420

Bison Bone Rasp from the Crandall Site, 14RC420
Date: 1500-1800 CE
This rasp was excavated from the Crandall site in Rice County during the 1983 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. The rasp was made by cutting grooves into a bison rib. At some point, the rasp was broken into two pieces. Archeologists believe that artifacts like these could have been used as musical instruments by drawing a stick across the grooves. The Crandall site is a Little River focus Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) habitation site.


Bone Awl from the Saxman Site, 14RC301

Bone Awl from the Saxman Site, 14RC301
Date: 1500-1650 CE
This awl was found at the Saxman village in Rice County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2014. Awls such as this one are usually made from deer bone. They were used to make holes in soft material, like hides, and possibly in basket and pottery manufacturing.


Bone Awl from the Saxman Site, 14RC301

Bone Awl from the Saxman Site, 14RC301
Date: 1500-1650 CE
This awl was found at the Saxman village in Rice County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2014. Awls such as this one are usually made from deer bone. They were used to make holes in soft material, like hides, and possibly in basket and pottery manufacturing.


Bone Awl from the Saxman Site, 14RC301

Bone Awl from the Saxman Site, 14RC301
Date: 1500-1650 CE
This awl was found at the Saxman village in Rice County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2014. Awls such as this one are usually made from deer bone. They were used to make holes in soft material, like hides, and possibly in basket and pottery manufacturing.


Bone Awl from the Saxman Site, 14RC301

Bone Awl from the Saxman Site, 14RC301
Date: 1500-1650 CE
This awl was found at the Saxman village in Rice County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2014. Awls such as this one are usually made from deer bone. They were used to make holes in soft material, like hides, and possibly in basket and pottery manufacturing.


Bone Awl from the Saxman Site, 14RC301

Bone Awl from the Saxman Site, 14RC301
Date: 1500-1650 CE
This awl was found at the Saxman village in Rice County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2014. Awls such as this one are usually made from deer bone. They were used to make holes in soft material, like hides, and possibly in basket and pottery manufacturing.


Bone Rasp and Decorated Bone from the Paint Creek Site, 14MP408

Bone Rasp and Decorated Bone from the Paint Creek Site, 14MP408
Date: 1500-1800 CE
These two modified bone tools were recovered in 1968 by Kansas Historical Society archeologists at the Paint Creek village in McPherson County. These two tools were made on either bison or deer bones. The one on the left is a scored rib bone. Archeologists believe that artifacts like these could have been used as musical instruments by drawing a stick across the grooves. The artifact on the right may have also been a rasp or possibly a decorated bone. It was incised with a series of vertical and diagonal lines. The Paint Creek site is part of the Little River focus of the Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita), whose people practiced fishing, hunting, gathering, and agriculture.


Bone Rasp from the Crandall Site, 14RC420

Bone Rasp from the Crandall Site, 14RC420
Date: 1500-1800 CE
This rasp was excavated from the Crandall site in Rice County during the 1983 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school. The rasp was made by cutting grooves into a bison rib. At some point, the rasp was broken into two pieces. Archeologists believe that artifacts like these could have been used as musical instruments by drawing a stick across the grooves. The Crandall site is a Little River focus Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) habitation site.


Bone Rasp from the Saxman Site, 14RC301

Bone Rasp from the Saxman Site, 14RC301
Date: 1500-1650 CE
This rasp was found at the Saxman village in Rice County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2014. The rasp was made by cutting grooves into a deer rib. Archeologists believe that artifacts like these could have been used as musical instruments by drawing a stick across the grooves.


Bone Rasp from the Saxman Site, 14RC301

Bone Rasp from the Saxman Site, 14RC301
Date: 1500-1650 CE
This rasp was found at the Saxman village in Rice County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2014. The rasp was made by cutting grooves into a deer rib. Archeologists believe that artifacts like these could have been used as musical instruments by drawing a stick across the grooves.


Bone Rasps from the Saxman Site, 14RC301

Bone Rasps from the Saxman Site, 14RC301
Date: 1500-1650 CE
These four bone rasps were recovered from the Saxman village site in Rice County and donated in 2016 to the Kansas Historical Society. Archeologists believe that artifacts like these rasps could have been used as musical instruments by drawing a stick across the grooves. The Saxman site is a Late Great Bend aspect village site lived in by ancestral Wichita Indians.


Bone Rasps from the Tobias Site, 14RC8

Bone Rasps from the Tobias Site, 14RC8
Date: 1350-1650 CE
Shown here are two of the many bone rasps excavated at the Tobias site, a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) site in Rice County. The Tobias site was the location of the 1977 and 1978 Kansas Archeology Training Program field schools. The shorter bone rasp was recovered in 1977, while the longer one was recovered in 1978. The rasp was made by cutting grooves into a deer rib. Archeologists believe that artifacts like these could have been used as musical instruments by drawing a stick across the grooves. One rasp does not have as deeply cut grooves as the other, perhaps not being fully finished or perhaps having a different purpose.


Deer Bone Rasp from the Tobias Site, 14RC8

Deer Bone Rasp from the Tobias Site, 14RC8
Date: 1350-1650 CE
Shown is one of the many bone rasps excavated at the Tobias site, a Great Bend aspect (ancestral Wichita) village site in Rice County. This rasp, manufactured on a deer mandible, was made by cutting notches into the bone. Archeologists believe that artifacts like these could have been used as musical instruments by drawing a stick across the grooves. The rasp was recovered from the 1977 Kansas Archeology Training Program field school at the Tobias site.


Scrapers from the Saxman Site, 14RC301

Scrapers from the Saxman Site, 14RC301
Date: 1500-1650 CE
Shown are five of the numerous scrapers that were collected from the Saxman site in Rice County and donated to the Kansas Historical Society in 2017. The scrapers would have been hafted on a handle and used to scrape hides. They would have required periodic resharpening. The small brown scraper was made on Smoky Hill silicified chalk, which outcrops in western Kansas and Nebraska. The others were made on Permian chert, two of which were heat treated to improve their knapping qualities. The Saxman site, a large Great Bend aspect village, was occupied by the ancestral Wichita.


Showing 1 - 14

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